How Do I Crumb Coat A Cake?

Decorating By sugarwishes Updated 16 Oct 2008 , 8:04pm by yvy_cano

sugarwishes Posted 13 Oct 2008 , 4:21pm
post #1 of 19

Every time I was crumb coating (or at least thought thats what I was doing) I was always using regular buttercream to do so. I'm now reading on other posts that it has to be a very thin layer. So heres my question:

How thin does the buttercream have to be? Am I supposed to add water and actually thin out my icing, or just use a small amount of buttercream?

I would appreciate someones help as I am VERY new at this.
Thank You icon_smile.gif

18 replies
cakecookingnut Posted 13 Oct 2008 , 4:37pm
post #2 of 19

I use water to thin out my buttercream to do my crumbcoat. After I coat the cake I usually sit the cake in the refrigerator or on the counter for about 15-30 minutes before I put the final coat of frosting on.

cherrycakes Posted 13 Oct 2008 , 4:39pm
post #3 of 19

I make sure my icing is a nice spreadable consistency. Then I use the advice of my instructor and spread the icing on like "buttering toast". Then put it in the fridge for a few minutes to set and then put the final coat on.

Rosie2 Posted 13 Oct 2008 , 4:43pm
post #4 of 19

Sorry to butt-in icon_redface.gif ....do you always have to crumb coat a cake or only when you cover it with fondant? I never crumb coat my cakes...is that why my frosting never looks smooth??

BDW, I don't sell cakes or anything, ok? my cakes are only for family or friends icon_smile.gif

MacsMom Posted 13 Oct 2008 , 4:45pm
post #5 of 19

I use regular BC. It's not really that it has to go on thin, but you will be applying a second coat of BC to get a smooth layer under fondant or for your BC decorations so you have to think about how much BC you want on the cake overall.

If it's going to be under fondant, it's better to keep it thin because if you add too much BC with both layers of BC it may be difficult to smooth away lumps around the top edge of the tiers: As you're smoothing you may end up pushing the BC around under the fondant).

I love that crumbcoat, though. It's hard trying to get a perfect BC coat on a fresh cake, so the crumbcoat allows you to forget about perfection... It's so much easier to get a smooth layer of BC on over a cold, firm crumbcoat.

cherrycakes Posted 13 Oct 2008 , 5:14pm
post #6 of 19
Quote:
Originally Posted by MacsMom



I love that crumbcoat, though. It's hard trying to get a perfect BC coat on a fresh cake, so the crumbcoat allows you to forget about perfection... It's so much easier to get a smooth layer of BC on over a cold, firm crumbcoat.




I totally agree with MacsMom. Since I started crumbcoating I have seen a huge improvement in my cakes overall and icing is so much easier too.

sugarwishes Posted 13 Oct 2008 , 5:46pm
post #7 of 19

Thank You all so much for your tips!!! It is all very helpful, can't wait to do my next cake so I can practice.

HerBoudoir Posted 13 Oct 2008 , 5:52pm
post #8 of 19

The crumb coat acts as sort of a "sealer" so that your cake crumbs don't get into your outer layer of buttercream that everyone sees icon_smile.gif

I use the same buttercream that's going on the outside, and then chill it really well to make sure the crumb coat is set.

If the outside buttercream is going to be chocolate and I'm using a chocolate ganache filling (something I do as sort of my all-purpose all-occasion donated cake) I'll spread extra ganache on as a crumb coat and it works just peachy icon_smile.gif.

MacsMom Posted 13 Oct 2008 , 6:44pm
post #9 of 19

OT - but Sue, I love your avatar and signature quote! icon_lol.gif

Rosie2 Posted 16 Oct 2008 , 4:16pm
post #10 of 19

Is there a good or perfect recepie for buttercream for crumb coat??
Thank you all!!

yvy_cano Posted 16 Oct 2008 , 4:40pm
post #11 of 19

Rosie2 I never crumbcoat, and my cakes come out pretty smooth, see my gallery... I tried to but never could get it thin enough icon_razz.gif so I gave up and decided to skip it cause it was taking up too much of my time trying to get a perfect crumbcoat lol. I hope to never come across a mess that could have been avoided by crumbcoating.

allycatt Posted 16 Oct 2008 , 4:57pm
post #12 of 19

my crumbcoat has been tearing apart my edges. I think I'll try to thin it out a bit, hopefully that will help.

hummingbird59 Posted 16 Oct 2008 , 5:08pm
post #13 of 19
Quote:
Originally Posted by xtrulyexotic

Every time I was crumb coating (or at least thought thats what I was doing) I was always using regular buttercream to do so. I'm now reading on other posts that it has to be a very thin layer. So heres my question:

How thin does the buttercream have to be? Am I supposed to add water and actually thin out my icing, or just use a small amount of buttercream?

I would appreciate someones help as I am VERY new at this.
Thank You icon_smile.gif




I use my BC but I thin it with a little white corn syrup. When I don't coat I wind up with crumbs in my icing. This really helps to seal in the cake moisture too.

Rosie2 Posted 16 Oct 2008 , 5:23pm
post #14 of 19
Quote:
Originally Posted by yvy_cano

Rosie2 I never crumbcoat, and my cakes come out pretty smooth, see my gallery... I tried to but never could get it thin enough icon_razz.gif so I gave up and decided to skip it cause it was taking up too much of my time trying to get a perfect crumbcoat lol. I hope to never come across a mess that could have been avoided by crumbcoating.




Yvy_cano thank you very much for your response...I am planning to do my first fondant cake and I was told to crumb coat...do you think I don't need to??

Rosie2 Posted 16 Oct 2008 , 5:26pm
post #15 of 19
Quote:
Originally Posted by yvy_cano

Rosie2 I never crumbcoat, and my cakes come out pretty smooth, see my gallery...




I saw your gallery WOW....your cakes are beautiful, but I'm in love with your zebra-purse-cake, it's awesome!!!!
Thank you for your help.

sugarwishes Posted 16 Oct 2008 , 5:29pm
post #16 of 19

I finally got the chance to crumbcoating last night. After all of the response and tips I got from everyone here, it came out great!! it was the first cake i did that came out really smooth. doing the crumb coating, the correct way, has made it SO much easier. Thank You All!!

sugarwishes Posted 16 Oct 2008 , 5:44pm
post #17 of 19
Quote:
Originally Posted by yvy_cano

Rosie2 I never crumbcoat, and my cakes come out pretty smooth, see my gallery... I tried to but never could get it thin enough icon_razz.gif so I gave up and decided to skip it cause it was taking up too much of my time trying to get a perfect crumbcoat lol. I hope to never come across a mess that could have been avoided by crumbcoating.




Your cakes do come out so smooth and no crumbs. Is there something different I should do, maybe as far as how long I let the cake cool or should I refridgerate? I am new at this, so I don't know which way to go now.

yvy_cano Posted 16 Oct 2008 , 6:00pm
post #18 of 19

Thank you! For fondant I apply a reg coat of buttercream cause most people peel the fondant off and i dont want them to eat an icing-less cake (thats the best part! lol). I would be careful with the pressure while smoothing out the fondant so it doesnt push the buttercream through the bottom. I know I may be asking for trouble that way but i like the look of fondant and like the taste of buttercream icon_razz.gif

yvy_cano Posted 16 Oct 2008 , 8:04pm
post #19 of 19
Quote:
Originally Posted by xtrulyexotic



Your cakes do come out so smooth and no crumbs. Is there something different I should do, maybe as far as how long I let the cake cool or should I refridgerate? I am new at this, so I don't know which way to go now.




I do freeze overnight then defrost throught out the day, then ice... I would highly recommend the sugarshack buttercream and fondant dvd. I always tell my friends "oh me and sharon (sugarshack) are going to ice a cake tonight cause as im icing I play her dvd to guide me through it. I never ice without her!!!!! It was the best investment for me.

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