Cake Didn't Come Out Of Pan

Decorating By bizatchgirl Updated 12 Oct 2008 , 4:27am by bizatchgirl

bizatchgirl Posted 11 Oct 2008 , 7:19am
post #1 of 12

In one piece anyway. Half came out and half didn't. I greased and floured like I always do without any issues. It's the first time in a while that I've baked a 'bigger' cake. The pan was 12x12 and I used 2 doctored cake mixes.

I'm figuring since I don't usually have this problem that either my cake didn't really cook all of the way or I didn't let it cool long enough.

What is the right temp for this? The cake seemed solid on the outside well before it was done in the middle. I did use another CCer trick of little foil thingies for better heat distribution.

How long would you cool a cake of this size?

What's the best way to flip the cake out of the pan if the cake didn't cook to the level of the pan? I cut a cake board to the size of the pan and put it over the cake and tried to hold it flush to the cake as I flipped it over. I didn't know what to do when I got it all flipped over so I set it on the counter. Maybe the cake just ripped when it went that extra inch or so to the counter with no support?? I just can't figure out another way to flip it. Would you put a book or something under the cake board to elevate it to the level of the cake in the pan??

11 replies
ceshell Posted 11 Oct 2008 , 7:39am
post #2 of 12

Uggh, been there, cried about that! When I get worried about cakes releasing, I use a parchment round in the bottom of the pan. I know lots of people here never need to bother, but it's a great insurance policy. What did you grease the pan with btw? That 33/33/33 cake release works amazing. But I still put parchment in 'em if they're 10".

Hopefully someone else will be able to answer your other questions! I've never done a 12" so that's out of my league.

sarahno Posted 11 Oct 2008 , 7:53am
post #3 of 12

well it has happened to me too but that was years back.
first grease the pan with butter and then sprinkle flour making sure it sticks allover the pan and cut baking paper for the bottom of the pan only. i bake big cakes 12, 14, 16, 15X9 etc so i know the way it is.
when the kake is cooked, check with a clean knive in the center, turn it out on a cake board upside down first for 3mins and let it cool.
i ice my cakes with the bottom because, that way you get a better smoother top, cut any uneven top when cake is cold and still in the pan.
Tips: let cake be cool in the pan for a more moist cake and cut to an even top before icing. good lick thumbs_up.gif

bizatchgirl Posted 11 Oct 2008 , 1:49pm
post #4 of 12

Thanks for your help. Maybe I will try another release. Maybe mine is just not strong enough for such a big cake. I just use the good old fashioned crisco and flour mix. Maybe next time I'll try the 33/33/33 and/or parchment. For today, I'm just going to go with 2 9x13's since I'm just cutting it into blocks. I'm not messing around with the 12x12 and wasting more time! I already have 2 cakes worth of wasted cake to make into cake balls now!

FlourPots Posted 11 Oct 2008 , 6:11pm
post #5 of 12

I use parchment paper also, and not just for cakes, for anything that needs to be baked. Absolutely nothing sticks to it.

My favorite is baking chicken wings on a cookie sheet w/ parchment, instead of in a rectangular pan with a little bit of water, which I did for years...they get deliciously crispy and in less time.

bizatchgirl Posted 11 Oct 2008 , 6:43pm
post #6 of 12

I made 2 more cakes in the 9x13 pan. The white cake came out perfectly. The strawberry (Cake Mix Dr) cake had difficulties coming out of the pan. So, the recipe is definitely part of the issue. Just a really soft cake and probably not going to hold up well when I try to make it into blocks icon_cry.gif

Cake_Princess Posted 11 Oct 2008 , 7:46pm
post #7 of 12
Quote:
Originally Posted by bizatchgirl

In one piece anyway. Half came out and half didn't. I greased and floured like I always do without any issues. It's the first time in a while that I've baked a 'bigger' cake. The pan was 12x12 and I used 2 doctored cake mixes.

I'm figuring since I don't usually have this problem that either my cake didn't really cook all of the way or I didn't let it cool long enough.

What is the right temp for this? The cake seemed solid on the outside well before it was done in the middle. I did use another CCer trick of little foil thingies for better heat distribution.

How long would you cool a cake of this size?




I let my cakes sit in the pan until I can pick them up without using any oven mitts but they are still quite warm. Usually about 15 minutes. To release them I gently run a spatula around the edge. To make sure that they have released on the bottom. Gently shake the pan in an upward motion. If the cake has released it will move. Do this all the way around and you will definitely be able to tell if the cake is stuck in any area before you flip. If it's stuck just tap on the bottom of the pan.

Quote:
Quote:

What's the best way to flip the cake out of the pan if the cake didn't cook to the level of the pan? I cut a cake board to the size of the pan and put it over the cake and tried to hold it flush to the cake as I flipped it over. I didn't know what to do when I got it all flipped over so I set it on the counter. Maybe the cake just ripped when it went that extra inch or so to the counter with no support?? I just can't figure out another way to flip it. Would you put a book or something under the cake board to elevate it to the level of the cake in the pan??




Stick a cooling rack on top and simply flip out. If it's domed a bit flip it over again so it's sitting domed side up.

Shelly4481 Posted 12 Oct 2008 , 2:29am
post #8 of 12

I may be the odd one out here but I flip my cakes onto the board it will be on. I coat my pans with good ole spray (with butter) I found the reg didn't work as well. I take it out of oven and let it set for about 5 minutes, while it is cooling I get the board ready, flip it out on it. Then I don't have to worry about cracking, then put saran wrap on good and stick in freezer. I have done this for 15 years. I also bake at 325 - 330 so that I dont get that dome in middle. Hardly ever have to trim a cake.

CakeDiva73 Posted 12 Oct 2008 , 3:21am
post #9 of 12

I use parchment paper on every single cake I make - no matter how small. I sat up one night cutting a bunch of different cake circles, labeled them and now I don't have to worry about the cake sticking. I spray Pam on the sides and that's that. I also use a rose nail on the smaller 6" cakes to ensure they don't dry out waiting for the inside to cook. Most would say it's overkill but for me, the little bit of extra work is worth knowing that (knock on wood) the cake won't fall apart or be raw.

FromScratch Posted 12 Oct 2008 , 3:34am
post #10 of 12

I use parchment on every single cake too. I spray the sides with Pam and put the parchment paper in the bottom and never ever have an issue with sticking. It's worth the extra few seconds it takes to cut the parchment.

You can buy pre-cut circles too. I plan on getting some soon to make it a little easier. Spoil myself a little.. icon_lol.gif

CakeDiva73 Posted 12 Oct 2008 , 3:44am
post #11 of 12

Well I got lucky at a thrift store and found a restaraunt package of sealed 10" scalloped round parchment circles for about $3.50 but even before I found that, I got a huge case of parchment paper at Smart & Final. It was a bit pricey, $36 for 1000 double sheets but I sort of icon_smile.gif sold off some of the excess on eBay to help offset the costs.

There are so many things I am thrifty (i.e. cheap icon_biggrin.gif) about but parchment just ain't one of 'em!

bizatchgirl Posted 12 Oct 2008 , 4:27am
post #12 of 12

Thank you. I think I will go with parchment in the future. I'm sure the words will be repeating themselves in my head as I'm making two cake mixes worth of cake 'garbage' into cake balls. Shoulda used parchment, shoulda used parchment icon_mad.gif

I think the lesson is learned! icon_biggrin.gif

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