Did I Just Get Lucky?

Decorating By absijails Updated 12 Oct 2008 , 6:07pm by absijails

absijails Posted 11 Oct 2008 , 2:20am
post #1 of 7

Can someone explain salmonella to me? I lived in Africa where eggs are not refrigerated, have no sell-by date and never once got sick. Generally I cooked them, but ate plenty of meringues and mousse.
Did I just get lucky or are eggs kind of like canned goods - in the absence of air the bacteria doesn't grow? Because our eggs came with feathers stuck to them, they all got washed really well once they got home. icon_biggrin.gif
Thanks!

6 replies
bobwonderbuns Posted 11 Oct 2008 , 2:29am
post #2 of 7

Hmmmm, I'm no expert on the subject but it seems to me that here in the States everything is pasteurized ad nauseum and when it isn't bacteria grows in plenty. I know that heat plays a big factor in the growth of bacteria. I'll be interested to hear what the others have to say.

megankennedy Posted 11 Oct 2008 , 2:38am
post #3 of 7

now don't quote me on this...but I recently read an article in cooks illustrated that addressed this topic. I wondered as well before, and they explained it like this: Eggs in America require refrigeration b/c of the process they go through (i think it's washing) when they are being packaged. The process removes an outer film on the egg that would otherwise protect it from bacteria? In other countries the film is not removed... I hope this is right - If I can find that article I will pm you...

HTH

sweetsbystacy Posted 11 Oct 2008 , 2:50am
post #4 of 7

Salmonella on eggs is found on the OUTSIDE of the shell. It's when the shell comes into contact with the inside of the egg that the salmonella can get in there. That's why it's good to use an egg separator when trying to get whites instead of the shell.

Just thought I would add that in there!

GI Posted 11 Oct 2008 , 3:01am
post #5 of 7

Egg shells act as a shield against bacteria. Old or sickly hens can lay weakend eggs. Weakened shells can allow bacteria to get into the egg. Farmers are really not supposed to "wash" the egg, but to wipe it off. Washing it can thereotically wash the fecal matter into the egg.

I grew up on a farm. HTH for all you city-slickers icon_biggrin.gif

indydebi Posted 11 Oct 2008 , 3:11am
post #6 of 7
Quote:
Originally Posted by megankennedy

now don't quote me on this...but I recently read an article in cooks illustrated that addressed this topic. I wondered as well before, and they explained it like this: Eggs in America require refrigeration b/c of the process they go through (i think it's washing) when they are being packaged. The process removes an outer film on the egg that would otherwise protect it from bacteria? In other countries the film is not removed... I hope this is right - If I can find that article I will pm you...

HTH




That makes sense .... I remember my gramma (who raised chickens) would have baskets of eggs sitting in her backporch for days.

absijails Posted 12 Oct 2008 , 6:07pm
post #7 of 7

That's really interesting about our washing process...

Thanks everyone for the information!

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