I Thought That Was A No No!!

Decorating By cakemommy Updated 26 Oct 2008 , 12:47am by SHogg

cakemommy Posted 9 Oct 2008 , 4:11am
post #1 of 48

Okay, so I have been watching Amazing Wedding Cakes on the "We" channel and the episode from Sunday night showed the decorators putting a cake covered in fondant in the "fridge"!

I thought that was a big NO NO with fondant. How were these decorators able to stick their cakes in the fridge and not have the fondant get spotty, tacky, and have the airbrush colors not run?!?!

I must have missed that class!


Amy

47 replies
auntginn Posted 9 Oct 2008 , 4:32am
post #2 of 48
Quote:
Originally Posted by cakemommy

Okay, so I have been watching Amazing Wedding Cakes on the "We" channel and the episode from Sunday night showed the decorators putting a cake covered in fondant in the "fridge"!

I thought that was a big NO NO with fondant. How were these decorators able to stick their cakes in the fridge and not have the fondant get spotty, tacky, and have the airbrush colors not run?!?!

I must have missed that class!


Amy


WOW!! You and me both. I know you can stick it in the fridge if it is properly packaged, so that air does not hit it. But straight!! Go Figure.

SMcDonald Posted 9 Oct 2008 , 4:33am
post #3 of 48

I was watching the same episode and thinking the very same thing. I am still pretty new at decorating and thought I had misunderstood something. I am glad that somebody else thought that that was strange.

chutzpah Posted 9 Oct 2008 , 4:33am
post #4 of 48

I don't know about them, but I have a 'dry refrigerator', especially for cakes. It has no humidity and all my fondant cakes go in there. Even if it's full in that fridge I have put cakes in the other one, but in a box with the lid on.

amberhoney Posted 9 Oct 2008 , 4:36am
post #5 of 48

Must have missed that class too...maybe because I never went to any classes icon_wink.gif I didn't know that was a no-no...almost all of my cakes are fondant and I almost always put them in the fridge. Never once had a problem with condensation. I think they are safer from ants/dust/kids in there so for me its more safe than sitting them out on the bench. Just goes to show, do what works for you and don't be afraid to break rules icon_lol.gif

panchanewjersey Posted 9 Oct 2008 , 4:37am
post #6 of 48

Heck last time I did it my fondant got soggy and gooey. No good, learned my lesson the hard way. That's what I get for listening to those of you who swear that fondant CAN go in frig.

PinkZiab Posted 9 Oct 2008 , 4:46am
post #7 of 48

I only work in fondant (satin ice) and refrigerate all of my cakes, without exception, straight up, no box or anything.

buttercream_dreams Posted 9 Oct 2008 , 4:49am
post #8 of 48
Quote:
Originally Posted by amberhoney

Must have missed that class too...maybe because I never went to any classes icon_wink.gif I didn't know that was a no-no...almost all of my cakes are fondant and I almost always put them in the fridge. Never once had a problem with condensation. I think they are safer from ants/dust/kids in there so for me its more safe than sitting them out on the bench. Just goes to show, do what works for you and don't be afraid to break rules icon_lol.gif



i'm tottally with you on this one- i always put my fondant in the fridge- although most times i can think of, i wasnt using mmf..which i know is what alot of people on CC use=reason1 is why it may work for some and not others. And 2=the obvious factors, like frig temp, humidity, room temp etc..
so for those of you who say you cant, there must be a way to, well...can. if you want anyway.
I agree that it makes me feel better knowing that the food is in the frig-cake included.

on another note- what network is that from do you know? is it just WE? cuz i have never heard of this or seen it on my tv channels..

cakequeen50 Posted 9 Oct 2008 , 4:55am
post #9 of 48

I always put my satin iced cakes in the fridge. If it does occasionally come out and starts to sweat, it will dry. As mentioned above, I think it really depends on your fridge, your region and the fondant of your choice.

auntginn Posted 9 Oct 2008 , 4:56am
post #10 of 48

The WE channel = Women's Entertainment and can be found on cable chanels.

hth

liapsim Posted 9 Oct 2008 , 5:01am
post #11 of 48

I always put my fondant covered cakes in the fridge and never have had a problem....I didn't know it was a No No....

tiersfromheaven Posted 9 Oct 2008 , 12:06pm
post #12 of 48

I guess it is the fridge. I have two and both so far have been really great to my fondant cakes. I've left one in up to three days and not sweat. I did have one fridge however that did cause the sweats no matter how much I adjusted settings. I need to know about this dry fridge. It is like the basic coolers for florists?

ShopGrl1128 Posted 9 Oct 2008 , 2:05pm
post #13 of 48

At the American Bakery Expo couple of weeks ago Ron Ben Israel said he put ALL his already decorated cakes in the fridge.
He says he puts his cakes on the fridge so the fondant stays soft when cutting it, I was shocked!
He mentioned he uses some kind of chemical or powder or something that he puts on the fridge that eliminates the humidity.
I canât recall what it wasâ¦I would love to know.

kakeladi Posted 10 Oct 2008 , 12:06am
post #14 of 48

As others have said, it depends on the frig temp, humidity, room temp etc.
On that program you can tell that is a special dedicated frig. probably low humidity or they use that special chemical BRI mentioned.
When I had my shops I had a special frig. there was no problem putting any icing in it.

bobwonderbuns Posted 10 Oct 2008 , 12:43am
post #15 of 48

I put fondant cakes in the frig all the time. I cover them in plastic wrap and bring them to room temp when I need to work on them. Just don't touch the cake when it's coming to room temp, the condensation sinks back into the fondant without spotting. I've never had a problem.

SugaredUp Posted 10 Oct 2008 , 1:05am
post #16 of 48

I'm very curious about this chemical and dry refrigerators!

banba Posted 10 Oct 2008 , 10:01am
post #17 of 48

Sachets of silicone are used to soak up damp so maybe it's that.

Save the ones you get in new handbags etc and keep them in the fridge but be careful of harm to children etc.

playingwithsugar Posted 10 Oct 2008 , 10:46am
post #18 of 48

They're called dessicants, and are toxic via contact or ingestion.

Theresa icon_smile.gif

cakemommy Posted 10 Oct 2008 , 2:33pm
post #19 of 48

Thank you for all of your responses everyone! thumbs_up.gif CC's issues yesterday prevented me from getting in to the forums!!! icon_mad.gif

I too am curious about a "dry refrigerator". I have never heard of such a thing and is apparently for commercial use only.

I have kept a fondant covered cake in the fridge once...ONCE and it just sweat like the dickens and my colored fondant accents ran. It might have also had to do with the outside room temp. If a fondant cake can indeed be kept in a fridge then I am all for that as it will help with stability and shape for sure when it's a warm day.



Amy

chelleb1974 Posted 16 Oct 2008 , 7:04pm
post #20 of 48

Don't quote me on this, but I believe it depends on the type of fondant you are using.

I know there's at least one brand (Wilton, maybe???) that will sweat and run if it's been in the fridge. I, personally, use Satin Ice and it can be put in the fridge with no after-effects.

marmalade1687 Posted 16 Oct 2008 , 7:46pm
post #21 of 48

Another vote for Satin Ice in the fridge - I do it all the time, with no problems! thumbs_up.gif I have lustre dusted it too, with no ill effects.

chelleb1974 Posted 16 Oct 2008 , 7:49pm
post #22 of 48

I believe it says it on their website somewhere, that it can be refrigerated. I don't know of another brand that tells you it's ok to put it in the fridge. But....I could be wrong too.

cakemommy Posted 16 Oct 2008 , 8:02pm
post #23 of 48

Thank you very much for the information. Do you buy your Satin Ice online or do you have a local shop? If online, who has the best deal!


Thank you all so much. I really really want to start doing more fondant cakes but have had no luck with Wilton or MMF in the fridge!!


Amy

chelleb1974 Posted 16 Oct 2008 , 8:06pm
post #24 of 48

I know you can order it online, but I'm not sure from whom, and what the cost is - I'll let someone more knowledgable answer that. icon_smile.gif



I buy mine from a local cake deco shop that sells it.



.........actually, I think I bought it online once because the store I go to was out of a particular color. I don't remember who I bought it from though.

ShopGrl1128 Posted 16 Oct 2008 , 8:32pm
post #25 of 48

I buy Satin Ice from into-the-oven $46.49/ 20 lbs + shipping +/- $15.00.

They have a 10% discount for the month of October only, just type in "October" as a coupon code when checking out.

cakemommy Posted 16 Oct 2008 , 8:39pm
post #26 of 48

Now I don't do that many cakes and so this should last me a bit then right? Does it come in a plastic bag inside a tub? Of course if I were going to do a fondant 3 or 4 tier cake then I will use the whole tub practically.

Thank you both for answering my questions! icon_rolleyes.gificon_biggrin.gif


Amy

ShopGrl1128 Posted 16 Oct 2008 , 8:54pm
post #27 of 48

Yes, In a blue plastic bag inside of a bucket...that I re-use for powdered sugar and flour icon_lol.gif

The tub seals very tight so the fondant stays fresh, nice and soft.

They also have a 5lb tub for $14.39 (+10% discount!).

I'm actually placing my order with the right now, I normally buy 2-20lbs tubs at the time.

SHogg Posted 16 Oct 2008 , 9:03pm
post #28 of 48

I've only put one fondant cake in the fridge. It was covered in Satin Ice. And when I took it out it was a diaster. It sagged and the condensation wouldn't dry. But I'm not opposed to trying it again, it may have just been a fluke. My next cake I'm using Choco-pan, I wonder if that can be refrigerated?

MacsMom Posted 16 Oct 2008 , 10:12pm
post #29 of 48

I have a regular old refrigerator and all of my cakes go into it, completely decorated.

Of course they develop condensation as they come to room temp, but it dries just fine. The only time a cake didn't dry was when it was raining outside, but I used a blowdryer and it dried the fondant instantly.

I've even put one in the freezer because I was going on vacation and the cake was due the morning after we were to return. From the freezer, cakes need to be thawed in the fridge overnight before bringing to room temp to avoid excess sweating. That customer said it was the best tasting cake she'd ever gotten from me! lol.

cakemommy Posted 17 Oct 2008 , 4:10am
post #30 of 48

WOW!!! Great price!!! Thank you for the help.

I have never tried Choco-Pan. I have heard of it but never tried it.

Don't the colors get mottled or spotted and really tacky when brought to room temperature?


Amy

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