Cake Slid Off The Board In The Car

Decorating By JodieF Updated 15 Oct 2008 , 4:16am by vicky

JodieF Posted 9 Oct 2008 , 12:45am
post #1 of 19

Yikes....I've read enough of these stories that I thought I knew how to avoid it. It was doweled through both tiers, on a non skid mat in a box in the trunk and THAT was on another mat. I was driving like a grandma.
I made this baby shower cake for a co-worker. That goodness it was covered in fondant! I think that saved it. A truck cut me off and I had to brake. It wasn't a slam on the brakes moment, but I guess it was hard enough. When I got to the restaurant, the cake had slid halfway off the cake board! It was just balanced there. The little basket on top was tipped. All I could think of to do was to gently slide it back to the center of the board.
You can see in the mirror that the grass border and flowers were gone in the back. The top tier was slightly off, but I was afraid to mess with it.
I'm glad this was a freebie!
LL

18 replies
Laura612 Posted 9 Oct 2008 , 1:34am
post #2 of 19

It still looks really cute. thumbs_up.gif

JodieF Posted 9 Oct 2008 , 2:14am
post #3 of 19

Thanks Laura...and welcome to CC!! Prepare to become an addict!

Jodie

tiersfromheaven Posted 9 Oct 2008 , 12:15pm
post #4 of 19

Nice Save!! This has never happened to me and I dread the day that it does. How do you attach the bottom cake to the base board? I always place my bottom tier on a board and tape that down to the base board. I have never used a center dowel driven through base board and never had this problem. Knock on wood

This cake stills looks great!

stephaniescakenj Posted 9 Oct 2008 , 12:51pm
post #5 of 19

That is a great save!!! It looks fantastic! I recently had that happen with a topsy turvy and a very steep driveway. i had the thing doweled and even doweled again because I was afraid it would tip over being a topsy turvy... well I got to the driveway (a.k.a. mount everest) and it tipped over, all three tiers, flat on its side. it stayed together because of all the doweling, but I never drove the dowel through the cake board at the bottom. I really think it would have made it, if I had. I was able to pick it back up and sit it back on the board. Luckily I made way too much cake and so we didn't need the smashed side. But from now on, no matter how small the cake, i use a center dowel and I put it all the way through to the cake board. I find that the cakes are a little more sturdy that way too.
You made such a cute cake!

leah_s Posted 9 Oct 2008 , 1:49pm
post #6 of 19

So do any of you guys want to talk about SPS? There's a sticky at the top of the How Do I? Forum that explains it.

pianocat Posted 9 Oct 2008 , 1:50pm
post #7 of 19

Looks good to me-probably no one would have guessed there was a problem! This is exactly why I alway carry an emergency kit-I haven't really had to use it except to reattach fondant decorations, thank God! Nice save.
Cathy

JodieF Posted 9 Oct 2008 , 9:54pm
post #8 of 19

LeahS.....I have a set of SPS. I was using it in another cake. This cake was pretty last minute so there was no time to order more. Since this cake was the freebie, I used the SPS on the other cake. I intend to order more SPS when the budget allows so I have spare sets.

The dowel wasn't all the way through the board. The board is masonite. However, I think if it had been all the way though then the dowel would have just torn through the cake instead of the cake shifting.

I had ordered the Teddy Bear dressup cutters last summer. I was glad to get a chance to use them!

Sweetlepea Posted 9 Oct 2008 , 10:13pm
post #9 of 19

That was a nice save, it looks great to me!

leah_s Posted 9 Oct 2008 , 10:33pm
post #10 of 19

Jodie, are you sure you're not confusing SPS with SFS?

SPS = super cheap, disposable
SFS = expensive, returnable

missmersh Posted 9 Oct 2008 , 10:52pm
post #11 of 19

Hi Jodie!

Quote:
Originally Posted by JodieF


The dowel wasn't all the way through the board. The board is masonite. However, I think if it had been all the way though then the dowel would have just torn through the cake instead of the cake shifting.




I might have to disagree (kindly) with this. If you doweled all the way through the cake, the center dowel would be going through the cake board that the top tier was sitting on and it would have caught the cake and not torn through, even if the dowel wasn't going through the bottom board, and if you had used a normal cake drum, it would have been even more sturdy with a central dowel.

I may be wrong, but this is what I think. icon_smile.gif

I know it's hard to spend alot of money on a free cake....so I understand why you didn't use a drum and other support. icon_smile.gif

GREAT SAVE THOUGH! thumbs_up.gif I had a cake slide years ago and still get nervous every time. (That happened before my center doweling days.)

Cake still looked great! I don't think any of us would have known if you hadn't told us!

missmersh

leah_s Posted 9 Oct 2008 , 10:59pm
post #12 of 19

Actually, the center dowel can pretty easily tear thru the cake, if it's really going sideways. The center dowel is a bunch of false security, unless the shift is pretty slight. There are quite a few people on CC who have experienced cake being ripped by the center dowel. The dowel stays firmly embedded in the base board/drum but the cake is still moving because it's tender/soft.

JodieF Posted 9 Oct 2008 , 11:29pm
post #13 of 19

Nope LeahS...not confused at all. I have 2 kids in college right now. My daughter is working on her Masters thesis and just lost most of her hours at work due to cut backs. So, I'm helping her pay her bills too. Even an extra $20 for extra SPS plates and pillars would have been hard to do for the past month or two. The kids come first. icon_smile.gif

Thanks all. I was just kindof amazed that the cake was just balancing off the edge of the board and it didn't break! I know I got lucky.

Edited to say: Sorry for any misunderstanding. The cake was doweled through the top tier and board into the bottom tier. The dowel couldn't go into the board the cake was sitting on, because that board was masonite covered in freezer paper.

missmersh Posted 9 Oct 2008 , 11:48pm
post #14 of 19

leahs,
thank you for the clarification. I would not have thought that it could tear, but I guess I was wrong. I am usually pretty careful when transporting my cakes. I don't usually transport a cake over 2 tiers..(I have done 3 tiers, twice, but couldn't breathe the whole time) lol!!!!

Jodie,
I didn't realize you had center doweled. SORRY! icon_smile.gif I wonder why it would shift? That baffles me.

Sorry for disagreeing earlier...I should have waited until I had all the facts.

missmersh

JodieF Posted 10 Oct 2008 , 1:40am
post #15 of 19

MsMerch...please don't be sorry! I hadn't made myself clear about the center dowel.
It was really strange to me too! I mean, a cake is heavy, and sticky! You'd think that would have kept it from sliding over 6 inches!

indydebi Posted 10 Oct 2008 , 2:12am
post #16 of 19
Quote:
Originally Posted by leahs

There are quite a few people on CC who have experienced cake being ripped by the center dowel. The dowel stays firmly embedded in the base board/drum but the cake is still moving because it's tender/soft.




That would be me ... just last March.

Mencked Posted 10 Oct 2008 , 1:12pm
post #17 of 19

Your cake was really cute! I had a sheet cake slide around on the board yesterday--Nothing you can do about that--we just have crappy, horrible roads and the cake wasn't sitting perfectly level apparantly! So I just picked the cake board up, set it in the opposite angle and the cake slid back into place---I will never take even a small sheet cake anywhere unless it is sitting perfectly level--I had used rolled towels to make the pick up seat "level". HA! My inability to define level, bad shocks on the pickup and monstrous Oklahoma roads combined to give me a horrifyling 30 mile trip. (After I'd slid the cake back into position, I balanced the cake on one hand and drove with the other the entire trip to town). Lesson learned!

JodieF Posted 12 Oct 2008 , 10:57pm
post #18 of 19

Holy cow...this must be my WEEK for PIA cake stuff! I had a simple cake for today, 9 and 12 inch Red Velvet, cream cheese frosting. It was going to be surrounded and covered in chocolate covered strawberries. It was for a friend of my daughter, for her wedding.
Of course, it's an 85 degree weekend in October! That cream cheese frosting wouldn't cooperate at all! I spent hours putting it in and out of the fridge trying to smooth it, and chill it as the frosting softened. After I got all the strawberries on it, it looked okay, but I was ready to throw the whole cake off the deck! I'm still kicking myself for not turning on the AC.
It still had so many flaws, but it seemed like the harder I tried to get it smooth, the worse I made it. I just hope she's not disappointed. icon_cry.gif
LL

vicky Posted 15 Oct 2008 , 4:16am
post #19 of 19
Quote:
Originally Posted by JodieF

Yikes....I've read enough of these stories that I thought I knew how to avoid it. It was doweled through both tiers, on a non skid mat in a box in the trunk and THAT was on another mat. I was driving like a grandma.
I made this baby shower cake for a co-worker. That goodness it was covered in fondant! I think that saved it. A truck cut me off and I had to brake. It wasn't a slam on the brakes moment, but I guess it was hard enough. When I got to the restaurant, the cake had slid halfway off the cake board! It was just balanced there. The little basket on top was tipped. All I could think of to do was to gently slide it back to the center of the board.
You can see in the mirror that the grass border and flowers were gone in the back. The top tier was slightly off, but I was afraid to mess with it.
I'm glad this was a freebie!





Besides a non skid mat, I use a carpet pad covered by a tablecloth then the non skid pad under the cake. This acts as a shock absorber. My cakes never slide. Great job on the cake. icon_biggrin.gif

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