Another Head Scratching, What The... Moment.

Decorating By Eisskween Updated 9 Oct 2008 , 12:10pm by -K8memphis

Eisskween Posted 8 Oct 2008 , 11:20pm
post #1 of 8

I get an inquiry. Two cakes identical for a 25th wedding anniversary for two couples. Asked if I can duplicate a two tier from a picture. She sends the picture and it's pretty straight forward, two-tier stacked fondant beveled, simple decorations. Okay, no problem.

I emailed her back, "how many people are you planning to serve with the cakes, because I charge by the number of servings, and it will determine what size of tiers I need to create."

She responds: "Well we are having other desserts, so not many people will be eating the cake. The size of the cake in the picture will be fine."

MY QUESTION: Can you actually tell what size a cake is from a picture? I don't know about you, but most pictures could be the size of a table or the size of saucer. There is nothing else in the picture to judge from either, like a table, chair, person's hand, nothing.

Does this sound weird to you, or is it just me?

7 replies
indydebi Posted 8 Oct 2008 , 11:27pm
post #2 of 8

You reply, "OK, but what size is the cake in the picture?"

I will not be responsible for "not enough cake" if it's too small ... I will not be accused of selling her more than she needs "just to get her money!".

She tells me how big she needs the cake. All she has to do is let you know how many people she's expecting. It's a no-brainer.

Eisskween Posted 8 Oct 2008 , 11:45pm
post #3 of 8

I did ask her how many people and the reply was "not everyone will be eating cake because there will be other desserts." I asked her what size the cake was or what she expected and got, "oh something medium."

I did ask how many people she was planning on serving, TWICE, and got nothing.

I think I am just going to let this one go elsewhere. I don't like uncooperative customers. Not worth the aggravation.

Thank you Indydebi, I appreciate the input! icon_biggrin.gif

fiddlesticks Posted 9 Oct 2008 , 12:35am
post #4 of 8

I would tell her I cant make/ price your cake untill you give me a serving number and I have to know by this day/date , or you cant help her ?

indydebi Posted 9 Oct 2008 , 12:43am
post #5 of 8

Or ... you can tell her, "My 'medium' cake serves 300 people times my $4/serving means your cake will cost $1200. Will 300 servings be enough?" icon_twisted.gif

If nobody is going to decide then *I* will decide ... and you may not like MY decision! icon_twisted.gif

BlakesCakes Posted 9 Oct 2008 , 12:50am
post #6 of 8

Well, another way to skin the cat is to ask her how much she's going to spend on the cake. If she comes back with $50, tell her that amount will pay for X servings and that the cake will be 2 tiers, x" stacked on y" (and it will be very small).

Her response will give you plenty of useful information. You can also tell her that you have a minimum and that $50 doesn't come close.......

Heck, if she doesn't give the info that you need to work with, cut her loose.


Eisskween Posted 9 Oct 2008 , 7:44am
post #7 of 8

Thanks for all your great insight!

Rae, I cut her loose. I am not into guessing games and told her I was sorry, but after checking my schedule, I couldn't fit her in and recommended that she try another local baker.

Maybe she just caught me in one of those moods I guess, but cooperation is key to a good transaction.

-K8memphis Posted 9 Oct 2008 , 12:10pm
post #8 of 8

I responded, or tried to respond a couple times yesterday but cyber space was grid locked or something.

So anyway I would eyeball how much difference there was between the tiers and simply present her with two size possibilities. I mean I have done many cakes from photos. That is often the way anniversary cakes are ordered--for the nostalgia factor--it's not about servings.

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