Betty Crocker Mixes

Decorating By photofire Updated 12 Oct 2008 , 2:06am by TJCanadian

photofire Posted 7 Oct 2008 , 5:00am
post #1 of 15

Does anyone know where I can find a chart telling me how many mixes I would need for a 12, 9, and 6 inch tiered wedding cake?
Thanks!

14 replies
tammy712 Posted 7 Oct 2008 , 5:07am
post #2 of 15

How deep are your pans?

auntginn Posted 7 Oct 2008 , 6:01am
post #3 of 15

My 6 in pan is 4 inch deep - I use 1/2 a box
My 9 in pan is 3 inch deep - I use 1 full box
My 12 in pan is 2 inch deep - I use 3 boxes however I bake 2 separate layers

hth

photofire Posted 7 Oct 2008 , 7:54pm
post #4 of 15

I have both 2" and 6" pans for each size.

auntginn Posted 7 Oct 2008 , 8:14pm
post #5 of 15

What one is trying to achieve in a tierred or stacked cake is heigth. So whatever your cake pan sizes are, you may need to bake more than one layer to achieve the height.

I personally like my cakes to stand min. of 4" upon completion. More often they are 5 inches, after baking 2 - 2inch layers, level, fill and ice.

Hope this makes sense

kakeladi Posted 7 Oct 2008 , 9:18pm
post #6 of 15

For a 12x2 pan: 1 1/2 mixes
For a 9x2 pan: slightly less than one
For a 6x2 pan: 1/3 mix

For a wedding cake you will want to bake two of each size so your cake/tier will be 4" tall.

photofire Posted 11 Oct 2008 , 12:12am
post #7 of 15

So kakeladi you use one entire box for a 9 x2 inch round or do you split up one box between two 9x2 inch rounds? (I know you actually said slightly less than one but it was easier to type my question my way) Thanks!

Cake_Princess Posted 11 Oct 2008 , 1:39am
post #8 of 15
Quote:
Originally Posted by photofire

Does anyone know where I can find a chart telling me how many mixes I would need for a 12, 9, and 6 inch tiered wedding cake?
Thanks!




I have found that the amount of batter you end up with depends on the type of mix you are using.

To be on the safe said its best to find out how much batter you need for each pan then measure out the batter once it's made to fill your pans. This way you avoid the disappointment of a cake that comes out too flat. Or worse still, a cake that overflows because there was too much batter in the pan.

indydebi Posted 11 Oct 2008 , 2:01am
post #9 of 15

I tried to find the old thread where I posted the measurements ... the thread crashed, but I still have the narrative saved, so here's the cut-n-paste version ... I use Betty Crocker only.
-----------------------------------------------------------

0.5 mix = one 8" round or one 6" square
1.0 mix = one 10" round or one 8" square
1.5 mix = one 12" round or one 10" square
2.0 mix = one 14" round or one 12" square
3.0 mix = one 16" round or one 14" square

photofire Posted 11 Oct 2008 , 3:06am
post #10 of 15

indydebi are thoes 2 or 3 inch pans you are speaking about? What about for a 9x2 inch pan?

I made a box of BC white earlier today and I devided the box between two 8x2 inch pans and the layers are so short!

indydebi Posted 11 Oct 2008 , 3:12am
post #11 of 15

2" pans. I did notice a difference between my home oven and my comm'l convection oven. What kind of oven are you using?

calynmom Posted 11 Oct 2008 , 3:39am
post #12 of 15

Oh thank you so much for posting this. I have the same problem on how many mixes I need.

TJCanadian Posted 11 Oct 2008 , 4:09am
post #13 of 15

I have found that each BC mix nets about 5 1/2 cups of batter so if you use the wilton book that charts how many cups of batter you need for each layer, knowing 5 1/2 cups per box, helps. You can stretch one to 6 cups if you add an instant pudding mix and a little more liquid

photofire Posted 12 Oct 2008 , 1:26am
post #14 of 15

I am using a home oven, propane heated actually. I usually bake @ 350 for a scratch recipe, but I see now that I should have baked at 325 for the BC mix. Do you think that is why my layers are so short?

TJCanadian Posted 12 Oct 2008 , 2:06am
post #15 of 15

baking at a lower temp tends to make them rise more evenly, not dome in the middle.

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