Rolling Out Fondant: Do You Use Ps, Cs Or Crisco?

Decorating By handymama Updated 9 Oct 2008 , 12:08pm by allycatt

handymama Posted 6 Oct 2008 , 6:24pm
post #1 of 30

This week's cake experience was less than stellar--mostly because of the fondant. It was very soft and very stretchy, and wanted to sag, stretch and ultimately tear once it got on the cake. I re-covered a topsy-turvey cake five times. Finally I covered it with a thicker layer of fondant that wouldn't stretch and tear so quickly, only to have the whole cake implode from the bad day it was having (and yes, it was 4:00 am when it happened icon_mad.gif ). In the past when I used Crisco while rolling out fondant it got too soft and sticky. CS works pretty well, but I'm told it molds if left under the fondant/next to the cake for very long. It took ample amounts of PS to keep the fondant from sticking to the mat. However, after rolling/failing/kneading a few times the additional PS seemed to make it soft, stretchy and brittle! I've had better luck with rolling fondant thickly, but no one wants to eat it--including me! Since this was an expensive cake I was trying to keep the fondant thin enough that people would enjoy it. Still, there were comments about not liking it. All hints, suggestions, solutions are welcome.

29 replies
mandifrye Posted 6 Oct 2008 , 6:32pm
post #2 of 30

Invest in a silpat! Use a good quality fondant, and keep your fingers crossed ( icon_lol.gif )

I use a LIGHT swipe of crisco on my silpat and then sprinkle cornstarch on that. I then rub it in pretty well, and it seems to work well.

HTH

handymama Posted 6 Oct 2008 , 6:35pm
post #3 of 30

I have a silicone mat that I use.

marccrand Posted 6 Oct 2008 , 6:39pm
post #4 of 30

Corn Starch!! I'll never go back to PS! Crisco for kneading and my hands.

CakeMakar Posted 6 Oct 2008 , 6:44pm
post #5 of 30

I was taught with cornstarch, but heard on here to use Crisco. After a lot of heartache with covering, I remembered the cornstarch and used it again. Why did I switch?
I am hoping to get a big blue mat of my own. icon_biggrin.gif

chutzpah Posted 6 Oct 2008 , 6:45pm
post #6 of 30

Piece of vinyl, nothing on it. Works like a charm every time.

FromScratch Posted 6 Oct 2008 , 6:49pm
post #7 of 30

I used crisco for a while, but I use corn starch now. I put it in a dusting pouch and use a very little.. just enough to have it able to move around and not stick.. it takes a very little bit to achieve this.. the crisco was making the fondant really soft and hard to work with plus it was making the fondant a little tacky and the rolling pin was sticking to it making it come up and then I'd end up rolling over a wrinkled area and wrecking the work I just did. With the corn starch I have no issues.

leah_s Posted 6 Oct 2008 , 6:57pm
post #8 of 30

I use just a bit of veg shortening rubbed onto the counter. Works for me. I'm an ex-corn starch user.

MayWest Posted 6 Oct 2008 , 7:04pm
post #9 of 30

I use corn starch. I also use Satin Ice fondant. First I tried the MMF with crisco and corn starch with little success. Hope this helps!

laurynrn Posted 6 Oct 2008 , 7:05pm
post #10 of 30

I am an ex-cornstrach user and also an ex-powdered sugar user. I now use criso and it works perfectly for me. I use Satin Ice fondant and have never had a problem.

AmieW Posted 6 Oct 2008 , 7:10pm
post #11 of 30

vinyl works soo well. but veg shortening is a good alternative!

jadex77x Posted 6 Oct 2008 , 7:25pm
post #12 of 30

i use 1/2 cs and 1/2 ps in a dusting pouch for mmf on a vinyl mat. works for working with modeling chocolate too. this is what works for me .

CakeMakar Posted 6 Oct 2008 , 7:26pm
post #13 of 30

Mine always sticks to my vinyl. icon_sad.gif

tonedna Posted 6 Oct 2008 , 7:39pm
post #14 of 30

I use a little bit of all except for the vinyl. I just roll it ona big rolling pin.
Edna icon_biggrin.gif

BlakesCakes Posted 6 Oct 2008 , 10:12pm
post #15 of 30

A light swipe of crisco on a vinyl or silicone mat. I use Satin Ice or FondX for covering and Wilton for decos.

I don't find the little bit of crisco causing the problems with the fondant--I do find variations from bucket to bucket of fondant sometimes causing problems (not to mention heat & humidity thrown into the mix). To counter that issue, I add 1/3 Wilton to the other fondants to firm them up, retain flavor, and increase workablility--love the results!

In my book, cornstarch dries out, PS yields sticky, and crisco creates glide.

Rae

handymama Posted 6 Oct 2008 , 10:20pm
post #16 of 30

Blakescakes-what's a cake cruise???

BlakesCakes Posted 6 Oct 2008 , 10:24pm
post #17 of 30

The California cake club started these a few years ago--in between cake camp years. Last Sept. the cruise went to Alaska with Nick Lodge & Colette Peters. This year, in Dec., it goes to the Caribbean with Nick, BKeith Ryder, and Toba Garrett and they're doing hands-on classes as well as demos.

Info here: cakecruise.com
cakecamp.com

Rae

Sweetcakes23 Posted 6 Oct 2008 , 10:43pm
post #18 of 30

Question: Doesn't a silpat leave a pattern on your fondant?

I use the big blue mat, with Crisco to knead, until its smooth and soft. Then I switch to dusting with CS when doing the small items like decorations, and borders.

Also, I used to use the vinyl until my daughter brought to my attention that some clients might be upset about the "vinyl scare" that's going around. Just something to think about.

BlakesCakes Posted 6 Oct 2008 , 10:51pm
post #19 of 30

Yes, a silpat will leave a pattern, but since it's on the back of the rolled out piece, it shouldn't be a problem if the fondant is rolled thick enough (you shouldn't be turning the fondant over after rolling it).

As for the "vinyl scare", this has been brought up here on CC many times. I honestly believe that there's no reason to fear incidental contact with vinyl while rolling out fondant. Many of us have more concentrated contact with soft vinyl, and the phthalates that make it soft, every day.

Certainly eating a small piece of fondant that spent 2 minutes on vinyl is a total non-issue. If it isn't a non-issue for someone, they might want to consider moving into an environmentally controlled bubble and staying there indefinitely..................

Rae

Sweetcakes23 Posted 6 Oct 2008 , 10:56pm
post #20 of 30

True....

-K8memphis Posted 6 Oct 2008 , 11:37pm
post #21 of 30
Quote:
Originally Posted by Sweetcakes23

Question: Doesn't a silpat leave a pattern on your fondant?

I use the big blue mat, with Crisco to knead, until its smooth and soft. Then I switch to dusting with CS when doing the small items like decorations, and borders.

Also, I used to use the vinyl until my daughter brought to my attention that some clients might be upset about the "vinyl scare" that's going around. Just something to think about.




Yes there's a slight pattern but it either relaxes out or gets rubbed out.

Silicone is not part of the vinyl scare is it?

To answer the op--I use the big food safe mat and nothing else.

BlakesCakes Posted 6 Oct 2008 , 11:50pm
post #22 of 30

No, I don't think anyone is scared of silicone mats..........yet.........but give it time--I'm sure something will come up icon_lol.gif

Also, you shouldn't use sharp items to cut on the silpat (e.g. pizza cutters, knives, exacto, etc.), nor should you ever cut a silpat to another size, because the threads embedded in the silicone are fiberglass and those should not be exposed/released near food--and they hurt like the devil if they get stuck in your skin!

Rae

Kissycake Posted 7 Oct 2008 , 3:58pm
post #23 of 30

I'm just beginning to work with fondant so I don't really have an opinion on what works best. But I would love to find out more about a silpat - like where could I get one? Thanks.

tracycakes Posted 7 Oct 2008 , 4:10pm
post #24 of 30

I use a piece of vinyl that I got from Wal-Mart for use an a tablecloth. Very cheap and it works well. I used just a little cornstarch because powdered sugar is to gritty for me. I use shortening on my hands for kneading. That's it!

Sweetcakes23 Posted 7 Oct 2008 , 4:13pm
post #25 of 30

I bought mine at Sur La Table....spent too much I'm sure....But you can just google Silpat, it will bring up many.

handymama Posted 8 Oct 2008 , 5:53pm
post #26 of 30

OK, let's see if I've got this right. According to the answers the best thing to use when rolling out fondant is:

vinyl with CS
vinyl with Crisco
vinyl with nothing
don't use vinyl, it sticks

silpat with Crisco and CS

silicone mat alone
silicone with CS

Crisco alone
CS alone
1/2 CS and 1/2 PS

icon_biggrin.gificon_eek.gificon_biggrin.gificon_eek.gificon_biggrin.gificon_eek.gificon_biggrin.gificon_eek.gificon_biggrin.gificon_eek.gif

The one thing that does seem to be emerging is that PS is not the thing to use, and that a silicone or vinyl mat is helpful. I can see the wisdom of using a bit of Crisco to help more CS adhere.
All of this helps with the "rolling out" issue, but there's still the problem of the fondant itself being so relaxed that it just wouldn't retain a consistent thickness in the time it took to get it off the table and onto the cake that was sitting right beside it! Because of that remarkable stretchiness it also kept "going with gravity" once on the cake and was prone to tears.

BlakesCakes Posted 8 Oct 2008 , 9:16pm
post #27 of 30
Quote:
Originally Posted by handymama

I can see the wisdom of using a bit of Crisco to help more CS adhere.
All of this helps with the "rolling out" issue, but there's still the problem of the fondant itself being so relaxed that it just wouldn't retain a consistent thickness in the time it took to get it off the table and onto the cake that was sitting right beside it! Because of that remarkable stretchiness it also kept "going with gravity" once on the cake and was prone to tears.




I can see no wisdom to using crisco & cornstarch, simultaneously. You don't want CS to adhere to anything--and mixed with crisco it could make an unattractive mess that's hard to remove.

CS is a drying agent, but the type of drying that it imparts on fondant yields cracking & elephant skin. It doesn't "firm up" the fondant, but makes it more prone to tears.

The simplest way I've found to combat overly soft/stretchy fondant is to mix it with some Wilton (1/3 wilton to 2/3 Satin Ice, FondX, whatever). If I can't do that (i.e. no Wilton on hand), I have kneaded in some PS and most importantly--then let the fondant sit for at least 30 mins. before trying to re-roll it.

If kneading in some PS still doesn't get me where I need to be, I've kneaded in some gum tex or even tylose--not much--maybe a tsp. or 2 to 4lbs.--and let that rest, too, before re-rolling.

Sometimes, "going to gravity" isn't the fault of the fondant, either. It can be because the cake isn't sturdy enough to handle the weight of the buttercream & fondant applied to it. It can also be that the fondant is rolled too thick. It can be that it's just too warm or too humid (and the addtion of some gum tex or tylose can help with that issue, too).

Rae

allycatt Posted 8 Oct 2008 , 10:56pm
post #28 of 30

I didn't like the feel of crisco and have been using PS. My question is how do you get the PS off the fondant when the cake is done? There always seems to be some left on there. I'd like the cakes to have a "cleaner" look.

handymama Posted 9 Oct 2008 , 2:52am
post #29 of 30

allycat--I use a wide soft-bristle brush to remove any excess PS

allycatt Posted 9 Oct 2008 , 12:08pm
post #30 of 30

okay...thanks handymama

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