Carving With A Bavarian Cream Filling????

Decorating By Cakeonista Updated 19 Oct 2008 , 7:01pm by ZAKIA6

Cakeonista Posted 3 Oct 2008 , 3:47pm
post #1 of 36

hi,
i need help from anyone that can shed some light for me..............i am making a small purse cake and my friend wants bavarian cream filling, usually i make a dam of bc and then fill with bc, stack and then carve. with bavarian cream which is a little softer wont my filling oze from the sides once i carve my cake? or should i stack and carve and then fill my layers so its all done first? what would be the correct procedure for this cake? please help..........
mariu'

35 replies
PinkZiab Posted 3 Oct 2008 , 3:50pm
post #2 of 36

Are you using a sleeved filling or making bavarian cream from scratch? I've never used the packaged stuff, but if you make a real bavarian cream, once the gelatin sets, it's not oozing anywhere, so you'll be find to carve it.

smbegg Posted 3 Oct 2008 , 3:51pm
post #3 of 36

I would do a really good bc dam and then freeze before carving. I am not sure how good it would work, but that is what I would do.

Stephanie

ZAKIA6 Posted 3 Oct 2008 , 3:55pm
post #4 of 36
Quote:
Originally Posted by PinkZiab

Are you using a sleeved filling or making bavarian cream from scratch? I've never used the packaged stuff, but if you make a real bavarian cream, once the gelatin sets, it's not oozing anywhere, so you'll be find to carve it.




i want to try to make bavarian cream. do you have a recipe you could share.

PinkZiab Posted 3 Oct 2008 , 3:58pm
post #5 of 36
Quote:
Originally Posted by ZAKIA6

Quote:
Originally Posted by PinkZiab

Are you using a sleeved filling or making bavarian cream from scratch? I've never used the packaged stuff, but if you make a real bavarian cream, once the gelatin sets, it's not oozing anywhere, so you'll be find to carve it.



i want to try to make bavarian cream. do you have a recipe you could share.




I do, for both cream bavarian and fruit bavarian... I don't have my recipes with me right now, but I will post later today. But, as a rule, bavarian is very simple: Base + gelatin + whipped cream = Bavarian (bavaroise). The base for a cream bavarian is usually creme anglaise or a similar stirred custard, for a fruit bavarian, it's simply fruit puree (sweetened to taste). Again, I'll post specific measurements later!

ZAKIA6 Posted 3 Oct 2008 , 5:22pm
post #6 of 36

THANKS!
um for me gelatin=scary
but i cant wait to make it. i love boston creme pies and bavarian cream donuts from DD icon_smile.gif

Rocketgirl899 Posted 3 Oct 2008 , 5:29pm
post #7 of 36

Ziab! Looking forward to this as well icon_smile.gif

smbegg Posted 3 Oct 2008 , 5:37pm
post #8 of 36

I make mine w/out gelatin. I use a recipe that I found on shopbakersnook .com (no space). It is under the recipe section. Very yummy and easy to make.

Stephanie

Cakeonista Posted 3 Oct 2008 , 11:40pm
post #9 of 36

i think maybe i was calling my filling by a different name....lol i think i was referring to pastry cream, my recipe has no gelatin in it, but would love to get your bavarian cream recipes.....my recipe is as follows...
Ingredients
3 cups milk
Seeds scraped from one vanilla bean
8 yolks
3/4 cup sugar
6 tablespoons cornstarch
2 tablespoons butter, softened
Directions
In a 3 quart saucepot combine the milk and vanilla bean seeds. Combine the yolks and sugar in the bowl of a standing mixer fitted with the whisk attachment. Sift the cornstarch onto a piece of wax or parchment paper.

Scald the milk. Meanwhile, beat the yolks and sugar until they lighten in color. Remove the bowl from the mixer and stir in the cornstarch. Pour about 1/3 of the hot milk into the egg mixture, whisking continuously to incorporate. Whisk the tempered egg mixture back into the remaining hot milk, and place the pot back on the heat. Cook on medium high heat, stirring constantly but gently with the whisk, until the mixture comes to the boil. Reduce heat and let it boil for about 30 seconds, stirring constantly. Remove from heat and gently whisk in the butter. Strain the pastry cream into a bowl, place plastic wrap right down on the surface, and chill completely. This can be made up to 3 days ahead.

smbegg Posted 3 Oct 2008 , 11:48pm
post #10 of 36

People call it Pastry Cream, Bavarian Cream, or in the north I have even heard it called custard.

Some recipes use the gelatin to help it set up.

Stephanie

PinkZiab Posted 4 Oct 2008 , 12:11am
post #11 of 36

Actually Pastry Cream (Creme Patissiere) and Bavarian Creme (Creme Bavaroise) are two completely different products. Pastry cream is a type of starch-bound custard, and the base of a bavarian cream (creme anglaise) is a stirred custard (a fruit bavarian is lesser-known, and not a custard at all). Mind you what is commonly known as "Bavarian cream" in the US (i.e., like a donut filling) is NOT really bavarian cream and is much more similar to a pastry cream. My recipes follow classic definitions of these items.

Here are my base bavarian recipes:

Bavarois a la creme anglaise (Bavarian Cream)

The classic presentation is to mold this on its own in a fluted mold and served with fresh fruit or a sauce of your choice. It's also the classic filling for a charlotte royale, but can be used as a filling in many cakes and desserts.

2.5 gelatin sheets (you can google to find equivalent dry gelatin measures)
250 ml milk
100 grams granulated sugar
Vanilla bean, split and scraped
3 egg yolks
250 ml heavy cream

1. Bloom the gelatin in cold water
2. put the milk and roughly half the sugar, and the vanilla bean and scrapings in a saucepan and bring to a boil
3. whisk together the remaining sugar and egg yolks (do not do this too early as the sugar will dry the yolks egg and your product will not be smooth)
4. temper the egg mixture with 1/3 of the boiling milk
5. combine the two mixtures and place over medium heat stirring CONSTANTLY. Be especially attentive to the corners of the pan as the eggs will coagulate there first if you are not careful
6. Cook the mixture to nappant (when it coats the back of a spoon and drawing your finger through leaves a distinct line)
7. immediately remove from heat, squeeze the excess water from the gelatin leave and whisk into the custard
8. Strain through a chinoise or other fine strainer
10. Cool over an ice bath stirring occasionally as it cools to promote even cooling. The custard will resemble a loose jam at this point.
11. Whip the cream to a soft peak and fold into the cooled custard.
Mold or use as a filling however desired, but it should be given a full 24 hours in the refrigerator to set before serving.

------------------------------------------------------------------

This is the classic filling for a charlotte russe, but can be used in a multitude of molded desserts and as a filling for many cakes and desserts.

Bavaroise aux fruits (Fruit Bavarian)
2.5 sheet gelatin
250 grams fruit puree
100 grams granulated sugar
250 grams heavy cream

1. Bloom the gelatin in cold water
2. Heat half the fruit puree with all fo the sugar in a saucepan (no need to boil, just heat it through). remove from heat
3. Squeeze excess water from gelatin and whisk into fruit puree
4. Mix in remaining puree and set aside to cool. Mixture may be cooled in the fridge or over an ice bath, but should be stirred often during cooling to ensure mixture sets evenly
5. whip the cream to soft peaks
6. When the mixture has thicken to a loose jam consistency (not completely set) fold in the whipped cream until just combined

Mold as desired or chill and pipe out when needed.

Again, this is best served after 24 hours in the refrigerator.

If anyone would like my pastry cream recipes (I have 3 basic which several variations) I'll post those as well (as soon as I have time to type them lol).

Rocketgirl899 Posted 5 Oct 2008 , 1:40am
post #12 of 36

Thanks Ziab! Can't wait to try it!

ZAKIA6 Posted 6 Oct 2008 , 12:46am
post #13 of 36
Quote:
Originally Posted by PinkZiab

Actually Pastry Cream (Creme Patissiere) and Bavarian Creme (Creme Bavaroise) are two completely different products. Pastry cream is a type of starch-bound custard, and the base of a bavarian cream (creme anglaise) is a stirred custard (a fruit bavarian is lesser-known, and not a custard at all). Mind you what is commonly known as "Bavarian cream" in the US (i.e., like a donut filling) is NOT really bavarian cream and is much more similar to a pastry cream. My recipes follow classic definitions of these items.

Here are my base bavarian recipes:

Bavarois a la creme anglaise (Bavarian Cream)

The classic presentation is to mold this on its own in a fluted mold and served with fresh fruit or a sauce of your choice. It's also the classic filling for a charlotte royale, but can be used as a filling in many cakes and desserts.

2.5 gelatin sheets (you can google to find equivalent dry gelatin measures)
250 ml milk
100 grams granulated sugar
Vanilla bean, split and scraped
3 egg yolks
250 ml heavy cream

1. Bloom the gelatin in cold water
2. put the milk and roughly half the sugar, and the vanilla bean and scrapings in a saucepan and bring to a boil
3. whisk together the remaining sugar and egg yolks (do not do this too early as the sugar will dry the yolks egg and your product will not be smooth)
4. temper the egg mixture with 1/3 of the boiling milk
5. combine the two mixtures and place over medium heat stirring CONSTANTLY. Be especially attentive to the corners of the pan as the eggs will coagulate there first if you are not careful
6. Cook the mixture to nappant (when it coats the back of a spoon and drawing your finger through leaves a distinct line)
7. immediately remove from heat, squeeze the excess water from the gelatin leave and whisk into the custard
8. Strain through a chinoise or other fine strainer
10. Cool over an ice bath stirring occasionally as it cools to promote even cooling. The custard will resemble a loose jam at this point.
11. Whip the cream to a soft peak and fold into the cooled custard.
Mold or use as a filling however desired, but it should be given a full 24 hours in the refrigerator to set before serving.

------------------------------------------------------------------

This is the classic filling for a charlotte russe, but can be used in a multitude of molded desserts and as a filling for many cakes and desserts.

Bavaroise aux fruits (Fruit Bavarian)
2.5 sheet gelatin
250 grams fruit puree
100 grams granulated sugar
250 grams heavy cream

1. Bloom the gelatin in cold water
2. Heat half the fruit puree with all fo the sugar in a saucepan (no need to boil, just heat it through). remove from heat
3. Squeeze excess water from gelatin and whisk into fruit puree
4. Mix in remaining puree and set aside to cool. Mixture may be cooled in the fridge or over an ice bath, but should be stirred often during cooling to ensure mixture sets evenly
5. whip the cream to soft peaks
6. When the mixture has thicken to a loose jam consistency (not completely set) fold in the whipped cream until just combined

Mold as desired or chill and pipe out when needed.

Again, this is best served after 24 hours in the refrigerator.

If anyone would like my pastry cream recipes (I have 3 basic which several variations) I'll post those as well (as soon as I have time to type them lol).




thanks for the recipes. i am going to try your fruit bavarian since i can never get my curd smooth.
will this hold up between a layered cake.

also since i am looking for a filling like in the donuts... should i be trying to make the pastry cream?

PinkZiab Posted 6 Oct 2008 , 1:46am
post #14 of 36

This will absolutely hold up in a layered cake. Once it sets (as I said overnight is best) it's firm enough that the cake does not fall apart when sliced but so smooth and creamy to taste. For a donut filling you definitely want pastry cream, and depending on your taste, after the pastry cream is cooled you might want to lighten it up with some whipped cream... try ti both ways to see what you prefer.

ZAKIA6 Posted 6 Oct 2008 , 5:39pm
post #15 of 36
Quote:
Originally Posted by PinkZiab



If anyone would like my pastry cream recipes (I have 3 basic which several variations) I'll post those as well (as soon as I have time to type them lol).




sorry to be a pia icon_surprised.gif but can you share your pastry cream recipes....

PinkZiab Posted 6 Oct 2008 , 5:46pm
post #16 of 36

no problem... I'll post them tonight

Rosie2 Posted 6 Oct 2008 , 7:00pm
post #17 of 36
Quote:
Originally Posted by PinkZiab

no problem... I'll post them tonight




Sorry to butt in but PinkZiab you're awesome!! I've been looking for a good bavarian cream recepie, so thank you very much!!!! and a couple of questions....when you refer to 'fruit puree' (on the Fruit Bavarian) you mean any fruit puree? also, where do you find vanilla beans?? and one last question. Does both recepies for bavarian cream hold as fillings for a layered cake and they won't overflow??

Ok, thank you so, very much again!!

PinkZiab Posted 6 Oct 2008 , 7:06pm
post #18 of 36
Quote:
Originally Posted by Rosie2

Quote:
Originally Posted by PinkZiab

no problem... I'll post them tonight



Sorry to butt in but PinkZiab you're awesome!! I've been looking for a good bavarian cream recepie, so thank you very much!!!! and a couple of questions....when you refer to 'fruit puree' (on the Fruit Bavarian) you mean any fruit puree? also, where do you find vanilla beans?? and one last question. Does both recepies for bavarian cream hold as fillings for a layered cake and they won't overflow??

Ok, thank you so, very much again!!




Haha... thanks. Yes any kind of fruit puree to suit your taste. Both of these can be used as fillings or molded on their own as an individual dessert. You should let it set up slightly before putting it inside of a layer cake (not completely), and be sure to have a thick, firm dam piped on before hand. Fill the inside the dam, and then refrigerate overnight (this is very important--the gelatin needs 24 hours to set up completely). Then you will have a nice, firm but creamy filling in your cake. My FAVORITE thing for the fruit bavarian is to make an apple charlotte russe! YUMMMMM!!

ZAKIA6 Posted 6 Oct 2008 , 7:27pm
post #19 of 36

yes she is awesome!

PinkZiab Posted 6 Oct 2008 , 7:45pm
post #20 of 36

hehehe... you guys are SO good for my self esteem... I knew there was a reason I hung around here so much icon_biggrin.gif

crafty_mom Posted 6 Oct 2008 , 10:29pm
post #21 of 36

these sound soooooooo yummmmmmy!!! icon_lol.gif

Rosie2 Posted 6 Oct 2008 , 10:58pm
post #22 of 36
Quote:
Originally Posted by PinkZiab

hehehe... you guys are SO good for my self esteem... I knew there was a reason I hung around here so much icon_biggrin.gif




I can't wait for someone to ask for a cake to try your recepie icon_wink.gif

Thank youuuuu thumbs_up.gif

FromScratch Posted 6 Oct 2008 , 11:21pm
post #23 of 36

Ooooh.. I am going to try your bavaroise aux fruits. Sounds delicious.

tina5510 Posted 7 Oct 2008 , 12:34am
post #24 of 36

what are gelatin sheets

FromScratch Posted 7 Oct 2008 , 12:38am
post #25 of 36

They are sheets of dehydrated gelatin. icon_smile.gif

dandelion56602 Posted 7 Oct 2008 , 2:35am
post #26 of 36

PinkZiab, so when I google to find dry gelatin equivalent are you referring to something like Knox?

As for carving, i like to carve, mark, then disassemble, dam, fill, then reassemble.

PinkZiab Posted 7 Oct 2008 , 2:46am
post #27 of 36

Yes I'm referring to the regular unflavored powdered gelatin you can buy at the supermarket (Knox, or any other brand). You'll need to see what the equivalent amount to use in place of each sheet/leave of gelatin. I usually fill/assemble then carve, myself, but if it works for you, then go to it! lol I'm off to work on typing out those pastry cream recipes for you all.

tonedna Posted 7 Oct 2008 , 2:58am
post #28 of 36

How much water you need for the gelatin sheets to bloom?..

PinkZiab Posted 7 Oct 2008 , 3:02am
post #29 of 36
Quote:
Originally Posted by tonedna

How much water you need for the gelatin sheets to bloom?..




It doesn't matter... just make sure the water is very cold (and ice cube or two wouldn't hurt if your tap water isn't very cold). You only bloom the sheets in the water, then remove them from the water (squeezing out the excess) to use them. The water they are bloomed in is NOT used in the recipe.

sammie192 Posted 7 Oct 2008 , 3:38am
post #30 of 36

pinkziab thank for sharing you recipe. I use the sleeve I would like to try it. but I didn't know you can freeze the bavarian cream. Thanks sammie

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