Defrosting Cake.condensation Forms Under Saran Wrap..huh??

Decorating By sweetcravings Updated 5 Oct 2008 , 12:51am by Deb_

sweetcravings Posted 30 Sep 2008 , 7:49pm
post #1 of 37

Ok so i've read over and over that one should keep a frozen cake well wrapped during the thawing proceess to allow the condensation to remain on the wrapping not the cake BUT...I noticed that when i keep the wrap on ,the condensation actually forms on the underside of the wrapping thus coming into contact with the cake. icon_confused.gif I'm confused why this happens. My cakes are always fully cooled before freezing, i wrap them with two layers of saran and one layer of foil.
It hasn't been a huge problem i just unwrap my frozen cake and place a paper towel on top of it to thaw..if any moisture forms its usually on the underside of the cake which comes in contact with the cake circle. I usually trim this so i wasn't too concerned with it.
I'm just curious why i would have the opposite problem..anyone know? I find it strange.

36 replies
luelue1971 Posted 30 Sep 2008 , 7:55pm
post #2 of 37

This also happens to me, however after the cakes have thawed I always unwrapped and let the cakes "dry off" before I ice them. (sugarshacks advise.)

ziggytarheel Posted 30 Sep 2008 , 7:56pm
post #3 of 37

I'm not a scientist, but from my understanding, the plastic wrap would need to be loose while thawing for this to happen.

Yes?

ziggytarheel Posted 30 Sep 2008 , 8:00pm
post #4 of 37
Quote:
Originally Posted by ziggytarheel

I'm not a scientist, but from my understanding, the plastic wrap would need to be loose while thawing for this to happen.

Yes?




For example, I only get condensation inside my car if my window was open even a tiny bit.

ThreeDGirlie Posted 30 Sep 2008 , 8:08pm
post #5 of 37

You're not getting a good seal when you wrap your cake. The moisture in the air condenses on the cold object that it comes into contact with. So condensation INSIDE your wrap means that air has to be getting in through a poor seal...

You might want to look at how you're wrapping, because if you aren't air tight, then you could also end up with flavor funk from your freezer...

sweetcravings Posted 30 Sep 2008 , 9:50pm
post #6 of 37
Quote:
Originally Posted by ThreeDGirlie

You're not getting a good seal when you wrap your cake. The moisture in the air condenses on the cold object that it comes into contact with. So condensation INSIDE your wrap means that air has to be getting in through a poor seal...

You might want to look at how you're wrapping, because if you aren't air tight, then you could also end up with flavor funk from your freezer...




Hmm interesting...i use glade press and seal so it appears it is wrapped as tight as i can possibly get it..i dunno what else to do.

-K8memphis Posted 30 Sep 2008 , 10:12pm
post #7 of 37

My cakes get condensation on them inside the wrapper so I quickly unwrap my frozen cakes and brush off ice crystals before they melt into my cake--if they melt into my cake then I might get that bad freezer flavor in there and the outside gets soggy.

I swim upstream on this one, Cake-Buddy. icon_biggrin.gif

sweetcravings Posted 30 Sep 2008 , 11:01pm
post #8 of 37
Quote:
Originally Posted by k8memphis

My cakes get condensation on them inside the wrapper so I quickly unwrap my frozen cakes and brush off ice crystals before they melt into my cake--if they melt into my cake then I might get that bad freezer flavor in there and the outside gets soggy.

I swim upstream on this one, Cake-Buddy. icon_biggrin.gif




So i guess i'm not alone. icon_biggrin.gif Really i've learned how to deal with it so it's not a huge issue but i was just wondering why the common practise wasn't working in my case.

-K8memphis Posted 30 Sep 2008 , 11:33pm
post #9 of 37

I think it's crazy to leave the wrappings on and let all that alien moisture invade your precious territory. I have no earthly idea why so many people do this.

I mean you have to unwrap & let the cake 'dry' first?
That's cause you let condensation drip all over it.

~~~~~ ~~~~~ ~~~~~ ~~~~~

It's very nice to meet you!!! icon_biggrin.gif

Deb_ Posted 1 Oct 2008 , 12:34am
post #10 of 37

I highly recommend the Foodsaver for freezing anything.....cakes, bread, meats, etc. Never any ice crystals under the wrap. It's completely dry, which means no air got in at all during the freezing process. It's the only way I freeze. Very good $100 investment.

sweetcravings Posted 1 Oct 2008 , 12:46am
post #11 of 37
Quote:
Originally Posted by dkelly27

I highly recommend the Foodsaver for freezing anything.....cakes, bread, meats, etc. Never any ice crystals under the wrap. It's completely dry, which means no air got in at all during the freezing process. It's the only way I freeze. Very good $100 investment.




I just bought one a few weeks ago but hadn't tried it with my cakes yet...do you just seal the bags or do you vacuum and seal it??? I do love it for other stuff, i guess i just hadn't gotten around to using it with the cakes. Probably because the bags can get expensive to buy, much cheaper than saran and foil, especially since my cakes are only frozen for a few days and then thawed.

Kitagrl Posted 1 Oct 2008 , 12:56am
post #12 of 37

I never noticed a problem with this...but then, I toss mine into the fridge to thaw overnight...and then unwrap and fill and crumbcoat while cold. So maybe I'm dealing with less condensation that way.

-K8memphis Posted 1 Oct 2008 , 1:48am
post #13 of 37

What size cake can you put in the foodsaver? Is that the little pump one I'm seeing on tv now?

kcjc Posted 1 Oct 2008 , 2:18am
post #14 of 37

OK! I've been troubled about this same thing..also when are you covering w/simple syrup or. I bake,cool(while this is going on I'm making my flavored syrups..let that cool) then soak cake,let rest & absorb,then wrap w/multiple go arounds of plastic wrap & freeze for at least a few hours but mostly overnight...and yes condensation & syrup on wrap when removed. Cake is always cooled before i wrap(When should the cake be glazed?). Then I crumb coat while very chilled .Any and all sugestions would be appreciated. i quess my condenstion isn't too bad but I hate the thought of the syrup on the wrap instead of the cake.

kcjc Posted 1 Oct 2008 , 2:28am
post #15 of 37

dkelly27, I've had a food savor for years but never thought about trying w/cake.I thought it would compress it when it sucks the air out. Do you put the cake back in the pan to do this?

FromScratch Posted 1 Oct 2008 , 2:42am
post #16 of 37

You can get an 8" cake layer into the gallon sized bags for the hand held reynolds vaccum sealer. You just stop vacuuming before it starts to compress the cake. And the better version of the food saver has a variable suction so you can stop it before it compresses the cake too.

I don't have issues with condensation and I also put the cakes in the fridge overnight to thaw to fridge temp and then take them out to bring them to room temp.

ziggytarheel Posted 1 Oct 2008 , 7:49am
post #17 of 37
Quote:
Originally Posted by k8memphis

I think it's crazy to leave the wrappings on and let all that alien moisture invade your precious territory. I have no earthly idea why so many people do this.

I mean you have to unwrap & let the cake 'dry' first?
That's cause you let condensation drip all over it.

!! icon_biggrin.gif




But, I've never had a problem with this with anything I've ever frozen. All of the condensation goes on the outside of the wrapper or container. If I had that problem, I would be in agreement with you.

-K8memphis Posted 1 Oct 2008 , 11:55am
post #18 of 37

To me removing the wrappings allows the cold jujubees escaping the cake to be absorbed/dissipated by/into the air. If the cold jujubees are trapped by the wrapping then the wrapping gets cold and the warm air of the room hits the cold wrapping and viola water molecules form on the wrapping--there's cake on one side to absorb the water and the other side gets a little wet.

But the air and the condensation is no real problem--condensation is not that big a deal whether you let it soak in or not. It happens. If you simply unwrap it out of the box you eliminate the need to let it dry off after unwrapping yes?

KCJC--But what I do is splash the syrup, and fill my cakes, wrap like a mummy--then slide them in the Reynolds cooking bags (as in turkey cooking bags)--for extra large cakes I tape two bags together, freeze then just take the cake, brush off the ice crystals, then ice it frozen. That way, I have controlled the really messy part of assembling to one stage.

Ziggy, How could the water be contained to one side and not the other? Because by the time you remove the wrappings, the water on the inside is already soaked into the cake and disappeared itself. Don't you think? I don't know--

Deb_ Posted 1 Oct 2008 , 12:03pm
post #19 of 37
Quote:
Originally Posted by kcjc

dkelly27, I've had a food savor for years but never thought about trying w/cake.I thought it would compress it when it sucks the air out. Do you put the cake back in the pan to do this?




Sorry, I logged off early last night and I didn't see the questions for me icon_redface.gif

First, what I do is cool the cake as usual than I put the cake in the fridge to firm it up.
I place it in the bag and vacuum out the air, but I do this carefully, just until the cake is surrounded snugly with the bag. (Not like you would with a steak or piece of chicken), just enough to get the air out of the bag.

I can fit up to a 14 in. round/square in the bag, and the bags I buy you can cut them at any length, it's one continuous roll so the sheet cakes fit too.

I only freeze for one or two weeks too, so I reuse the bags. (only the cake bags, not meat bags)

k8memphis....the foodsaver I have is the electric model, but I was watching Biggest Loser last night and they showed the hand pump ones, I haven't seen that in the stores around here yet, but it looked cool.

I thaw the cakes in the bags on the counter and they are dry when I take them out. The trick is to completely cool them before freezing in the foodsaver.

ziggytarheel Posted 1 Oct 2008 , 3:44pm
post #20 of 37

I had a "duh" moment when I looked in the fridge this morning and saw condensation on the inside of the cellophane around last night's casserole and not the outside.

On my casserole, the condensation was on the inside while in the fridge because I put in in there before it was 100% cool. Of course any remaining warm moist air will rise and then condense on the inside of the cellophane. And, none would be on the outside of the wrapper because the dish was in the refrigerator.

So, I think the reason that I've never had any condensation on the inside of the plastic I wrap my cakes in is because I let them completely and totally cool first and then I wrap them very very tightly in several layers. I wait until the condensation has evaporated from the outside of the plastic, and then remove. No dampness at all.

Anyway, it works for me.

sweetcravings Posted 1 Oct 2008 , 4:05pm
post #21 of 37

Ziggy...i wish i was totally convinced that was the problem but..my cakes will remain on the counter to cool..lets say i bake it at 10am..i wont' wrap them for the freezer until 9;30/10pm..it's gotta be cool by then.

ziggytarheel Posted 1 Oct 2008 , 4:27pm
post #22 of 37

Well, you have me really stumped then. I thought the science behind it said that either the warmer room air is getting under your wrappings where it is colder or heated air is trapped under the wrappings and condense. I can't figure out another scenario. Maybe someone else can?

-K8memphis Posted 1 Oct 2008 , 7:49pm
post #23 of 37

It's the cold inside of the cake working itself out of the cake.

To me removing the wrappings allows the cold jujubees escaping the cake to be absorbed by, dissipated into the air.

If the cold jujubees are trapped by the wrapping then the wrapping gets cold and the warm air of the room hits the cold wrapping and viola water molecules form on the wrapping--there's cake on one side to absorb the water and the other side gets a little wet. Yes?

steffla Posted 1 Oct 2008 , 8:11pm
post #24 of 37

Sorry to go slightly off topic but while we are discussing this...I am at the stage of layers of cake baked, cooled, filled with non perishable filling, and resting. Is it possible to freeze at this point as this cake may now be delayed a few days (like 5)???? Should I crumbcoat first? Is it not possible at all?

Deb_ Posted 1 Oct 2008 , 8:43pm
post #25 of 37

Hi,
Yes, you can wrap them well and freeze at this point. Because of past experience, I wouldn't crumbcoat the cakes. The reason is because like k8memphis said, while the cake is thawing the coldness needs to escape, if it's crumbcoated it will sweat. It happened to me one time when I froze crumbcoated layers, now I know why icon_smile.gif Thanks k8 for that explanation!

dcabrera Posted 2 Oct 2008 , 12:12am
post #26 of 37

oh no, after reading this thread I'm a bit nervous. I froze my cakes for a shower on Saturday and now I'm scared I might get freezer funk. Should I unwrap now just to be sure? Will my cakes still be good for Saturday if I take them out now? I wrapped in saran wrap then in foil.

dcabrera Posted 2 Oct 2008 , 12:12am
post #27 of 37

oh no, after reading this thread I'm a bit nervous. I froze my cakes for a shower on Saturday and now I'm scared I might get freezer funk. Should I unwrap now just to be sure? Will my cakes still be good for Saturday if I take them out now? I wrapped in saran wrap then in foil.

ziggytarheel Posted 4 Oct 2008 , 5:24pm
post #28 of 37

Well, I took a cake out of the freezer this morning and kept a close eye on it as it defrosted.

It was double wrapped in plastic wrap (Sam's brand) and then in a ziplock bag with most of the air out of it before it was sealed shut.

All of the condensation formed on the outside of the bag. I took the cakes out of the bag before the condensation had evaporated. There was no condensation on the inside of the bag. No condensation on the first layer of plastic. No condensation on the second layer of plastic. And the cake was completely dry.

The outside of the bag was pretty wet.

That's the way it always works for me and why I couldn't (and still can't) figure out why it doesn't work that way for other people. icon_surprised.gif

-K8memphis Posted 4 Oct 2008 , 8:01pm
post #29 of 37

I don't know the science or the rhyme or reason of any of it.

I mean I also double wrap then slide mine in bags just like you, ZiggyT. The only difference is that I immediately unwrap mine, quickly brush off stray ice crystals before they melt and then I ice them right then & there all frozen. I don't have any condensation/water issues.

I guess if it works for us each in our different way, it works.

ziggytarheel Posted 4 Oct 2008 , 8:22pm
post #30 of 37

I don't ever have any ice crystals either?

The only reason I started letting mine defrost in the wrappings because I read several times on this website that it worked so well. And it has for me! I've been especially pleased when defrosting chocolate candies (like cake balls or molded candies). It has been a fantastic discovery.

I'm sorry that not everyone has had success with this method. Come to my house and use my supplies and my stinky freezer and you'll probably have success as well.

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