Anyone Have A Good, Light, White Cake Scratch Recipe?

Baking By Icingonyourcake Updated 30 Sep 2008 , 5:02am by JanH

Icingonyourcake Posted 29 Sep 2008 , 6:35am
post #1 of 7

I've been using the white cake recipe from Martha Stewart's Baking Handbook and have realized that it's too dense for my liking. Does anyone have a good white cake recipe from scratch? One that bakes up nice and light almost like a chiffon cake, but a little denser? Has anyone tried the white cake recipes on this site? Have any favorites?

Thanks,

Karen

6 replies
stephaniescakenj Posted 29 Sep 2008 , 6:23pm
post #2 of 7

I don't have one but I would be interested in what anyone else has to say! I usually use the 1234 cake and it's too heavy and a little dry so I started using WASC but took out the almond flavoring and added in rum extract because i'm weary of the nut allergy. it's good but I would like to have something scratch so I don't have to worry about having cake mix on hand. good luck with your search.

snarkybaker Posted 29 Sep 2008 , 10:31pm
post #3 of 7

This cake ends up very cake-mix like in texture without that rubbery emulsifier feel. Be sure to give a soak with simple syrup for best results.
Cake:
2 tablespoons softened butter, for pans
2 1/4 cups cake flour, plus more for pans
1 cup whole milk, at room temperature
6 large egg whites, at room temperature
1 vanilla bean, split and seeds scraped
1/2 teaspoon pure vanilla extract
1 3/4 cups granulated sugar
1 tablespoon plus 1 teaspoon baking powder
1 teaspoon fine sea salt
12 tablespoons unsalted butter, cut into 12 pieces, slightly cold


Preheat oven to 350 degrees F. Butter and flour 2 (9 by 2-inch) round cake pans and line bottoms with parchment paper.

Whisk together the milk, egg whites, vanilla bean seeds and vanilla extract in a medium bowl.

In the bowl of a mixer fitted with the paddle attachment, mix together the flour, sugar, baking powder and salt. With mixer running at low speed, add the butter, one piece at a time and continue beating until mixture resembles moist crumbs. Add all but 1/2 cup of milk mixture to crumbs and beat at medium speed until the mixture is pale and fluffy, about 1 1/2 minutes. With mixer on low speed, add remaining 1/2 cup of the milk mixture, increase speed to medium and beat 30 seconds more. Scrape sides of bowl and mix for 20 seconds longer. Divide the batter evenly between the cakes pan and smooth the tops using a rubber spatula.

Bake until a toothpick inserted into the center comes out with a few crumbs attached, 22 to 24 minutes. Cool in the pan on baking rack for 10 minutes. Run a small knife around the side of the pan and invert cakes onto the baking rack, removing parchment paper, and let cool completely, about 45 minutes.

-K8memphis Posted 29 Sep 2008 , 11:02pm
post #4 of 7

I really really really like Sylvia Weinstock's yellow cake recipe--I know I know it's named yellow but trust me it comes out white. I do not separate the whites I do eliminate a couple of the yolks. I make a nice emulsion with the butter and sugar and add the eggs and beat it up till it's pretty and all emulsed (is that a word, PinkZ? icon_smile.gif and then put in 1/3 of the dry, 1/2 of the sour cream the next third dry stuff, the rest of the sour cream and then the rest of the dry mixture, and beat it for 2 minutes.

I love it I love it I love it. So just google it--it's famous.

BUT I would not use this for the average wedding cake* or any cake that has to be refrigerated because once a butter based cake gets cold it doesn't seem to relax enough at room temperature again. Which is why to me the lion's share of scratch cakes are deemed not as pleasant as they really are.

But for a snack cake it is the bombshafreakingbomb. No icing necessary even but of course icing doesn't hurt anything either. It keeps at room temp like it's held in suspended animation--doesn't dry out.

*I deliver wedding cakes chilled.

Icingonyourcake Posted 29 Sep 2008 , 11:17pm
post #5 of 7

Thanks for the recipe....I've never thought of the butter setting in the cake while in the refrigerator, but it make sense. I tend to always refrigerate my cakes, because I use a lot of whipped cream fillings and Swiss butterbream frostings.

-K8memphis Posted 30 Sep 2008 , 12:05am
post #6 of 7
Quote:
Originally Posted by Icingonyourcake

Thanks for the recipe....I've never thought of the butter setting in the cake while in the refrigerator, but it make sense. I tend to always refrigerate my cakes, because I use a lot of whipped cream fillings and Swiss butterbream frostings.




Yeah me too. And oh how I love that cake and it's easy--it comes out beautiful but it tastes 'dry' even when it comes to room temp after being chilled or frozen. And you know it is not dry--but it's that 'scratchy scratch-cake' mouth feel. You know you've tasted it like that a million times. But kept at room temp or microwaved--be still my beating heart.

Yeah I tested between oil based and butter based and butter based lost.

(Can you tell I've been on a diet for over two weeks? The kicker is if I ever want to maintain my weight I have to stay on a special diet too. 'Special' meaning no sugar. icon_cry.gificon_lol.gif )

But I digress, that recipe is killer!

JanH Posted 30 Sep 2008 , 5:02am
post #7 of 7

White Triullium Cake

Cake:

3 cups sifted all-purpose flour
2 1/2 tsp. baking powder
1/2 tsp. salt
1 cup (2 sticks) butter, cut into pieces
2 cups sugar
1 Tbsp. milk
1 cup water*
1 tsp. vanilla extract
6 large egg whites (approx. 6 oz.)

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White Trillium Cake

Serves/Yields: 8 to 10
Prep. Time:
Cook Time: 30-35 minutes
Category: White Cakes, North American, Southern U.S.
Difficulty: Moderate


This cake was known in Louisville as Jenny Benedict's Souffle' Cake. Jenny Benedict was famous for the sandwiches, cakes, and ice creams that she served at her restaurant and in catering debutante parties and weddings in the early days of the twentieth century. We are told that Miss Benedict was very partial to flavoring her cakes with rum.

Cake:

3 cups sifted all-purpose flour
2 1/2 tsp. baking powder
1/2 tsp. salt
1 cup (2 sticks) butter, cut into pieces
2 cups sugar
1 Tbsp. milk
1 cup water*
1 tsp. vanilla extract
6 large egg whites (approx. 6 oz.)

Butter Frosting (recipe follows)

*The water in the cake may surprise you, but water makes a lighter white cake than milk.

1. Preheat the oven to 350 degrees.

2. Combine the sifted flour with the baking powder and salt, and sift
again. Set aside.

3. Cream the butter and sugar thoroughly with an electric mixer. Add
the milk and beat hard. (The mixture will become smoother.)

4. Add the flour mixture to the butter and sugar in batches, alternating
with the water, beating it in by hand with a rubber spatula or whisk.
Add the vanilla and mix well.

5. Beat the egg whites until they hold a stiff peak but are not dry and grainy. Gently fold them into the batter.

6. Spoon the batter into 2 greased and lightly floured or wax-paper-lined 9-inch cake pans. Place the pans on the middle shelf of the oven and bake until the layers spring back at once when lightly touched, 30 to 35 minutes.

7. Remove the pans from the oven and allow them to rest a few minutes. Then turn them out onto cake racks and let them cool completely.

HTH

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