Sheet Cakes

Decorating By deetmar Updated 27 Sep 2008 , 9:03pm by LisaMS

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deetmar Posted 26 Sep 2008 , 3:02pm
post #1 of 19

What size pan is a sheet cake pan, and how much would you charge for one. I have never been asked to make one but I now have a bride that needs to feed 300 people, so we are going to do some sheet cakes.

Thanks for your help.

18 replies
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tyty Posted 26 Sep 2008 , 3:26pm
post #2 of 19

I have sheet pans in 9x13 (35 for 1 layer cake), 11x15 (60 for 1 layer), 12x18 (80 for 1 layer).

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BCJean Posted 26 Sep 2008 , 3:37pm
post #3 of 19

The term sheet cake comes from bakeries who bake all of their cakes in an 18x24" pan. They then cut that cake in half for a 1/2 sheet which would be 12x18" or in fourths which would be 1/4 sheet 9x12. They use the batter in the full sheet = to 4 cake mixes. So a 1/2 sheet would be 2 cake mixes and a 1/4 sheet would be 1 cake mix. Most small cake pans available to the home baker are 9x13. If you bake only one mix in that it is not going to be very tall. I have an 8x11 which I use for a 1/4 sheet and it makes it a nice tall cake.

The large sheet cake pan will usually not fit in a standard home oven. You would need to bake 2 of the half sheets and put them together. A full sheet will serve 48 (4x4 pieces) or 96 (2x2 pieces). I usually quote them 65 servings from a full sheet.

Price would be up to you and what you charge. I work in a commercial bakery and we charge $59. for a full sheet cake. I know most home decorators would charge a lot more. I think most home decorators would use more than 4 mixes per full sheet also, so their cake would be a lot taller.
HTH

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kakeladi Posted 26 Sep 2008 , 6:43pm
post #4 of 19

Yes! What BCJean said ^^^^^ icon_smile.gif
If you match your cake to the size cake board & box sold for each size (1/4 sheet; 1/2 sheet; full sheet) yu will quickly see that a 12x16 OR even 11x15 will fit the 1/2 sheet board & box w/room for a border.
A 1/4 sheet: the 12x8 fits this board & box.
I also use one mix for a 12x8 and two mixes for the 11x15 [even for the 12x16icon_smile.gif]

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UltimateCakes Posted 26 Sep 2008 , 7:01pm
post #5 of 19

About pricing concerns, check members websites for what they charge. You'll notice that most of us charge roughly the same so you can have a good idea of what to expect.

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Suzycakes Posted 26 Sep 2008 , 7:04pm
post #6 of 19

I get a lot of orders for sheet cake style cakes -

For my 9 x 13 Magic Line pan I use almost 2 mixes (or recipes) of batter.

For my 12 x 18 Magic Line pan I use almost 3 mixes (or recipes) of batter - (same for the 12 x 16).

This lets the cake rise above the rim of the pan and I can cut it off level and still have a nice 2" tall cake to decorate.

If I were doing sheet cakes for a wedding to supplement the wedding cake - I would torte and layer 2 quarter or half sheets together to at least have the sheet cakes mimic the real wedding cake.

I would not want to have a piece of sheetcake cake and the next table have a 4 layer piece of beauty from the real wedding cake in front of them! icon_sad.gif

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sugaah Posted 26 Sep 2008 , 7:17pm
post #7 of 19

tell me where is the site that gives #servings for different size and shapes. This may help me. I'm struggling here. THANX

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Suzycakes Posted 26 Sep 2008 , 7:48pm
post #8 of 19

Of course there is a link here on CC.

Wilton has one.

Earlenes Cakes has one.

Now - I am not sure how many of those have sheet cake serving sizes. But sheet cake serving sizes are easy enough to figure. 2x2x2 pieces of cake represents a 2" tall cake cut 2 inches by 2 inches. On a 12 x 18 that should be 54 servings. On a 9 x 13 it should be around 24 to 28 servings.

Now if you double the cakes (like I suggested for the wedding sheet cakes) then you should try to serve a 1x1x4 to be exact - but those are impossible to cut (makes the piece to fragile and it falls apart). I can usually get a 1 1/2 x 1 1/2 x 4 piece fairly easily though and it will stay together. So you should figure on adding at least 50% more servings to a double layer sheet cake.

HTH

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lgrtaust Posted 26 Sep 2008 , 7:49pm
post #9 of 19

sugaah, you can look in just about any wilton book or go to the wilton website, I think it is wilton.com and get exact number of serving sizes and how to cut your cake to get the exact servings.

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tiggy2 Posted 26 Sep 2008 , 8:06pm
post #10 of 19

indydebi's cutting chart is much better and simpler the wilton's www.cateritsimple.com However, I don't think you need a cutting chart for a sheet cake.

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kakeladi Posted 26 Sep 2008 , 9:06pm
post #11 of 19

It is simple to figure how many servings you can get form a sheet pan.
Simply turn the pan over OR cut a piece of paper the size of the pan; mark off the size servings you think is the right size (2x2x2 OR 1 1/2x2x2 OR whatever you want) and count up the servings.
If you are making a dbl sheet (4" high) then the servings size should be 1x2x4 OR 1 1/2x2x4 etc.

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indydebi Posted 26 Sep 2008 , 9:30pm
post #12 of 19

tyty, how small are you cutting those pieces? Based on standard serving size of 2x2x2, a 11x15 single layer yields 35, a 12x18 yields 54. Am I misunderstanding something? icon_confused.gif

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allycatt Posted 26 Sep 2008 , 10:36pm
post #13 of 19

what size pan do most of you use the 2" or 3"? I'm new to all this and I need to buy a couple of pans but I'm not sure which one I need.

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indydebi Posted 26 Sep 2008 , 11:02pm
post #14 of 19

Since industry standard is 4" tall, I use 2" pans.

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kakeladi Posted 26 Sep 2008 , 11:25pm
post #15 of 19

I agree w/indydebi.

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allycatt Posted 27 Sep 2008 , 12:29am
post #16 of 19

okay.....thanks!

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deetmar Posted 27 Sep 2008 , 2:25pm
post #17 of 19

The cutting charts are all so different. I sat down with Wilton, the local grocery stores chart, and Earlene's, and they were all different. This makes it difficult. I don't think that Wilton's is right at all. I will keep working on it.
Suzycake, I agree, I wouldn't want a simple piece of sheetcake when my neighbor has a piece of beautiful cake. Thanks for the tip.

Thanks for the help with the sheet cakes.

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Deniro Posted 27 Sep 2008 , 8:40pm
post #18 of 19
Quote:
Originally Posted by BCJean

The term sheet cake comes from bakeries who bake all of their cakes in an 18x24" pan. They then cut that cake in half for a 1/2 sheet which would be 12x18" or in fourths which would be 1/4 sheet 9x12. They use the batter in the full sheet = to 4 cake mixes. So a 1/2 sheet would be 2 cake mixes and a 1/4 sheet would be 1 cake mix. Most small cake pans available to the home baker are 9x13. If you bake only one mix in that it is not going to be very tall. I have an 8x11 which I use for a 1/4 sheet and it makes it a nice tall cake.

The large sheet cake pan will usually not fit in a standard home oven. You would need to bake 2 of the half sheets and put them together. A full sheet will serve 48 (4x4 pieces) or 96 (2x2 pieces). I usually quote them 65 servings from a full sheet.

Price would be up to you and what you charge. I work in a commercial bakery and we charge $59. for a full sheet cake. I know most home decorators would charge a lot more. I think most home decorators would use more than 4 mixes per full sheet also, so their cake would be a lot taller.
HTH




Thank you so much this makes alot of sense now!

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LisaMS Posted 27 Sep 2008 , 9:03pm
post #19 of 19

Interesting all the variations of the sheet cake with amount of cake mixes used and number of servings quoted, etc.

My standard answer is this:

9 x 13 serves 15-20 and I use 1 cake mix

11 x 15 serves 30-35 and I use 2 cake mixes

12 x 18 serves around 50 (54 if you do 2 x 2 pieces) and I use 3 cake mixes

I agree 1 cake mix would look better/taller in a 8 x 11 pan but I've had my 9 x 13 pans forever. icon_smile.gif

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