What Am I Doing Wrong? Please Help

Decorating By dcabrera Updated 25 Sep 2008 , 10:14pm by -K8memphis

dcabrera Posted 24 Sep 2008 , 8:30pm
post #1 of 11

Every time I cover a cake with fondant it looks like there's cottage cheese under my fondant. What am I doing wrong? At first I thought my fondant was bad, but it's not. Am I not using enough or too much bc. Pleeeezze help.

10 replies
diana83 Posted 24 Sep 2008 , 8:34pm
post #2 of 11

well, they say yuo only need a thin bc layer, or maybe you need to tream the dam of the cake..

kakeladi Posted 24 Sep 2008 , 11:40pm
post #3 of 11

Your cake needs to be a smooth as possible before adding the fondant.
Are you having trouble getting the cake out of the pans and there are a lot of crumbs?
Have you covered th e cake w/b'cream or some other covering....which makes a smooth surface, along w/giving the 'stickiness' needed for the fondant to stick to?
Are you rollin g the fondant too thin ? It should be about 1/4" thick - which is the thickness of a cakr board icon_smile.gif

-K8memphis Posted 25 Sep 2008 , 12:18am
post #4 of 11

If I use thin fondant I need a thick buttercream. If I use a thick fondant I use a thin layer of buttercream--thin but smooth.

Hint for you--use a blob of fondant to smooth out any boo boo areas--however like you said if you have cake cellulite showing through smoothing will not help.

These days I also shave the sides of my cake nice & smooth before icing--I love the result--much less diddling with icing.

leah_s Posted 25 Sep 2008 , 12:47am
post #5 of 11

It kind of sounds like your fondant is too thin. But really the buttercream underneath the fondant should have smoothed out the sides of the cake.

dcabrera Posted 25 Sep 2008 , 2:40am
post #6 of 11

icon_lol.gif Cake cellulite. That's exactly what I'm talking about. I think my fondant may be too thin. That makes sense that the fondant should be as thick as a cake board. sometimes when I smooth my fondant the buttercream seeps a bit through the bottom. So I know I'm using enough bc. Right?

-K8memphis Posted 25 Sep 2008 , 11:50am
post #7 of 11
Quote:
Originally Posted by dcabrera

icon_lol.gif Cake cellulite. That's exactly what I'm talking about. I think my fondant may be too thin. That makes sense that the fondant should be as thick as a cake board. sometimes when I smooth my fondant the buttercream seeps a bit through the bottom. So I know I'm using enough bc. Right?




Hmm, mine doesn't do that--seep out--maybe your buttercream is too thin in consistency. Do you chill your iced cake before you apply fondant? I do. But I use a swiss meringue buttercream so it's real firm when cold then at room temp it's real soft. If you chill the iced cake first (and you are using American (crusting) buttercream) then you need to lightly mist the crust so the fondant adheres. The devil is in the details huh. icon_rolleyes.gif

But seeping is not an indication of using enough or not.

I'd say make you a cake and really consider the shaving the sides for your experiment here to see how you like that--then ice it with 1/4 inch of crusting buttercream--chill--mist lightly--then apply 3/8 inch of fondant and see how much better your results will be--you will get a nice handle on the process then and can jiggle your ratios going forward.

Maybe something like that would help.

Just some fond fondant thoughts for you.

dcabrera Posted 25 Sep 2008 , 3:31pm
post #8 of 11
Quote:
Originally Posted by k8memphis

Quote:
Originally Posted by dcabrera

icon_lol.gif Cake cellulite. That's exactly what I'm talking about. I think my fondant may be too thin. That makes sense that the fondant should be as thick as a cake board. sometimes when I smooth my fondant the buttercream seeps a bit through the bottom. So I know I'm using enough bc. Right?



Hmm, mine doesn't do that--seep out--maybe your buttercream is too thin in consistency. Do you chill your iced cake before you apply fondant? I do. But I use a swiss meringue buttercream so it's real firm when cold then at room temp it's real soft. If you chill the iced cake first (and you are using American (crusting) buttercream) then you need to lightly mist the crust so the fondant adheres. The devil is in the details huh. icon_rolleyes.gif

But seeping is not an indication of using enough or not.

I'd say make you a cake and really consider the shaving the sides for your experiment here to see how you like that--then ice it with 1/4 inch of crusting buttercream--chill--mist lightly--then apply 3/8 inch of fondant and see how much better your results will be--you will get a nice handle on the process then and can jiggle your ratios going forward.

Maybe something like that would help.

Just some fond fondant thoughts for you.











I use smbc too. Sorry I didn't specify. When you say shave the sides do you mean run a knife around the cake, or actually cut into the cake? I really don't like regular bc. I'm making a very rich chocolate cake and I'm thinking of using pastry pride because I think it tastes better with chocolate cake. Should I just use a thin crumb coat for the pp? By the way, thanks for you help everyone.

mixinvixen Posted 25 Sep 2008 , 3:34pm
post #9 of 11

reminds me of my heiny. icon_redface.gif

BritishGirlsLoveCake Posted 25 Sep 2008 , 9:46pm
post #10 of 11

What is swiss meringue butter cream? How would it differ form normal butter cream?

Sorry for the basic questions - I'm a real novice icon_redface.gif

Hx

-K8memphis Posted 25 Sep 2008 , 10:14pm
post #11 of 11
Quote:
Originally Posted by BritishGirlsLoveCake

What is swiss meringue butter cream? How would it differ form normal butter cream?

Sorry for the basic questions - I'm a real novice icon_redface.gif

Hx




Swiss meringue buttercream is made from a cooked meringue, that is egg whites and granulated sugar over boiling water then whipped into a meringue then soft butter & vanilla is added. So when room temp it is soft like I said then when chilled it is crisp like butter.

And yes I actually shave the cake a tid tad--I have found that removing most of the real dark carmelized edges makes it really difficult for them to show through the icing. thumbs_up.gif I mean I can use a more reasonable amount of icing too--it doesn't have to be a half inch thick to cover thoroughly everywhere--If you are not having to fill in little gaps and even out the cake underneath it just makes sense--I mean just for an iced cake without fondant. Well with fondant too for that matter.

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