How To Peel Off Fondant But Leave The Icing?

Decorating By allysons Updated 30 Sep 2008 , 1:09am by Sweet_Guys

allysons Posted 22 Sep 2008 , 7:28pm
post #1 of 16

I'm a newbie to cake decorating, and lately I've been dipping my hands into fondant decorating. The only problem is, I've found that a lot of people aren't big fans of fondant (although I haven't tried MMF yet). icon_wink.gif I've iced the cakes with BC underneath so that if they don't care for it, they can just peel off the fondant, but every time I've made a cake this way, the BC comes off with the fondant.

Is there a trick to making the cake so that when the fondant is peeled off, the BC will stay on the cake? I've tried putting the cake in the fridge, but it worked 50/50.

Thanks!

15 replies
JoAnnB Posted 22 Sep 2008 , 7:34pm
post #2 of 16

Unfortunately, the fondant is supposed to cling to keep it from sliding off. If you use fondant other than Wilton, many people will eat it, and most of them will like it.

amy2197 Posted 22 Sep 2008 , 7:35pm
post #3 of 16

i'd just tell them to scrap the icing off the fondant with a fork. only way that always works!

pkinkema Posted 22 Sep 2008 , 7:44pm
post #4 of 16

Boy do I wanna add my 2 cents worth!

Do we forsake the taste of a wonderful cake for looks? NO WAY! Admittedly, I am a beginner and not a "pro", but anyone I bake for does not like fondant--MMF or other.

It's the texture more than the taste that is objectionable.

IMHO, fondant is great for accent decorations, but not for the icing on the cake!

Anyone else agree?????? For some reason this comes to mind: Pretty is as pretty does! <g>

leah_s Posted 22 Sep 2008 , 7:55pm
post #5 of 16

I mostly do wedding cakes, and yes, sometimes looks are the first thing on the bride's list. They don't want a bad tasting cake, of course, but they're going to be looking at pictures of this cake for 40 years, and they want it to be pretty.

And I agree, if you'll use SatinIce or even Fondx, people will at least try it and a lot will eat it. It's only the Wailton fondant that's horrid.

MacsMom Posted 22 Sep 2008 , 8:04pm
post #6 of 16

It is a texture thing, I'm pretty certain.

However, I make MMF that tastes just like BC and stays soft, and I've also found that Fondarific makes a BC flavored fondant that stays soft, as well. Those two tend to get eaten (at least mostly--there's not as much left on the plate as there is when I've used Satin Ice).

Deb_ Posted 22 Sep 2008 , 9:08pm
post #7 of 16
Quote:
Originally Posted by pkinkema

Boy do I wanna add my 2 cents worth!

Do we forsake the taste of a wonderful cake for looks? NO WAY! Admittedly, I am a beginner and not a "pro", but anyone I bake for does not like fondant--MMF or other.

It's the texture more than the taste that is objectionable.

IMHO, fondant is great for accent decorations, but not for the icing on the cake!

Anyone else agree?????? For some reason this comes to mind: Pretty is as pretty does! <g>




Oh boy, do I ever agree with you! I've always felt this way even before fondant became so popular. That's why I started baking to begin with, so people could enjoy eating my creations. In my opinion, what the heck good is something that looks beautiful if people don't like to eat it? That my friends is what a "Dummy Cake" is for, beautiful to look at, but wouldn't want to eat that baby!


When I pour hours into a cake, it damn well better be the best cake people have ever eaten, so yes, taste first and than of course it has to be beautiful as well. But who was the genius that said BC cakes can't be as beautiful or perfect as fondant? They absolutely can and are thumbs_up.gif

Fondant as an accent is fine, I guess if you have to have it.

DianeLM Posted 22 Sep 2008 , 9:45pm
post #8 of 16

There's really no way to leave the buttercream behind since the fondant has to stick to it in order to stay on the cake. I torte my cakes into 4 layers of cake and 3 layers of filling to compensate for the icing lost with the fondant.

That said, I use FondX and Satin Ice, both very well-liked by customers.

pkinkema Posted 22 Sep 2008 , 9:57pm
post #9 of 16

Well, Diane, as I told you, you're my new hero so I certainly defer to the experts!!!!!

I haven't tired FondX. Where do I get it?

DianeLM Posted 22 Sep 2008 , 10:13pm
post #10 of 16

Hero? icon_redface.gificon_redface.gif

I order white FondX from www.caljavaonline.com. I used to order it from Pfeil & Holing because it was cheaper, but P&H's shipping was higher, so I was actually paying more there.

The odd thing is, Cal Java makes FondX. So, why is it more expensive from Cal Java?? Curious.... icon_confused.gif

I use Satin Ice pre-colored fondants, which I order from Global Sugar Art.

bostonterrierlady Posted 22 Sep 2008 , 10:38pm
post #11 of 16

I agree. People I know would not like fondant. I found people who love cake love it for the cake and buttercream. Only fondant accents for me.

MacsMom Posted 22 Sep 2008 , 10:43pm
post #12 of 16

I know a lot of people who don't like icing, no matter what type. Including myself. That's why it truly is the CAKE that should be outstanding.

mandifrye Posted 22 Sep 2008 , 10:57pm
post #13 of 16

As for taste and the look of fondant, I have to go with Jennifer Dontz's recipe for white chocolate fondant. It is fabulous to work with and it tastes great.

I have even found a way around the Pettenice by a using a specific recipe at home and splitting her recipe in half.

Order her DVD, you will not regret trying her recipe!!!

HTH

indydebi Posted 22 Sep 2008 , 11:07pm
post #14 of 16

There are many of us who are buttercream only decorators. I've never lost an order when a bride asked if I did fondant, and I told her "no". Once she saw that I can get the same, smooth look with BC as she sees with fondant, she is ok with it. They've brought me pictures of fondant cakes and we've done them in BC.

I've started to play with fondant as accent designs on cakes, though.

jjandhope Posted 22 Sep 2008 , 11:10pm
post #15 of 16
Quote:
Originally Posted by MacsMom

It is a texture thing, I'm pretty certain.

However, I make MMF that tastes just like BC and stays soft, and I've also found that Fondarific makes a BC flavored fondant that stays soft, as well. Those two tend to get eaten (at least mostly--there's not as much left on the plate as there is when I've used Satin Ice).




My husband is convinced all fondant tastes bad, so I made the MMF recipe from here on CC. He didnt like that either. Is your recipe different? Id love to have it, if it is!

Sweet_Guys Posted 30 Sep 2008 , 1:09am
post #16 of 16

We were introduced to Fondarific at the ICES convention in Orlando this summer. We tried several flavors from buttercream to vanilla to chocolate to fruit flavors. It's a little more expensive than your regular fondants; however, it is more pliable and works really well in humidity. They're based out of Savannah, GA. We liked working with it!

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