Sps Instructions

Decorating By leah_s Updated 24 Sep 2014 , 1:54pm by leah_s

leah_s Posted 16 Feb 2012 , 5:56pm
post #451 of 584

thumbs_up.gif

Right?

Easy. Strong. Stable. Cheap.

amandaluvscakes Posted 27 Feb 2012 , 3:05am
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I keep clicking on the download and it says "file not found" is it still attached to the thread?

sing Posted 27 Feb 2012 , 7:21am
post #453 of 584
Quote:
Originally Posted by amandaluvscakes

I keep clicking on the download and it says "file not found" is it still attached to the thread?




same here icon_sad.gif

leah_s Posted 27 Feb 2012 , 4:15pm
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Are you on PAGE 15 of the thread?

stephdover4 Posted 27 Feb 2012 , 4:50pm
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go here!
http://media.cakecentral.com/files/sps_104.pdf



hope this makes it easier than searching...good luck!

KimmW Posted 14 Apr 2012 , 6:55pm
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I found a video tutorial on YouTube and thought it might be of interest to some of you:

http://www.youtube.com/watch?feature=player_embedded&v=hURyXNQRuYY

Kimm

imanah Posted 18 Apr 2012 , 7:39am
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Hello,

I use sps only. I have a cake coming up and there will be a two inch tier in the mix.

12" regular
11" half tier
10" regular...and so on.

Should I get a longer column and put it through the 12" and 11" cake?

What is normally done in situations like that?

Thanks

leah_s Posted 14 May 2012 , 1:11pm
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Cut the legs to 2" and proceed normally.

imanah Posted 16 May 2012 , 2:17am
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Thanks that was exactly what I did icon_smile.gif

lorieleann Posted 17 May 2012 , 6:35am
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having a little issue with cake cracking upon inserting. I think that I may have my own answer here, but should the cake be room temperature when inserting the plate? I have had two side cracks on 8" tiers (one with a six inch on top, though over a very bumpy and hilly dirt road) and the second was on an 8" tier with an 8" plate inserted (double high tier). Both of these were inserted into well chilled cakes. I'm guessing that that is my problem. what do you think?

leah_s Posted 17 May 2012 , 7:21am
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I always work with cake at room temp and I never got a crack in a decade. I do not refrigerate cakes.

You do need to put the plate and leg assembly in SLOWLY.,

vgcea Posted 28 Jun 2012 , 9:43pm
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I noticed Bakery Crafts has EZ-cut pillars that go with the plates (eliminating the need for a saw for the Grecian). Has anyone tried these pillars?

ellavanilla Posted 9 Jul 2012 , 5:28pm
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I used the SPS, for the first time, this weekend. My last two cakes fell and I was terrified to have another go this way (first time in 15 years). The package arrived 2 hours before delivery! The system was great and worked perfectly!

I made one mistake that I would share, I measured the tiers from the top of my turntable to the top of the cake. Oops! That made each plate sit above the cake since I should have measured from the top of the cardboard cake round!

Luckily, the entire cake was covered in coconut, so mistakes were easily fixed. My 8 inch cake also cracked, but it was still cold when I pushed in the columns. I'm sure it wouldn't be a problem for a room temp cake.

Two benefits I haven't seen mentioned so I'd like to add.

#1 Placing a cake on top of a separator plate is 100 times easier than trying to center and stack a cake with spatulas and extra hands. As mentioned, the cake is also even! No leaning tower of cake that is impossible to fix once you have it tiered.

#2 Once the plate and columns were inserted into a tier I was able to pick up the cake between my thumbs and fingers, by touching the plate on top and the cardboard on bottom. NO touching the frosting. Im sure it helped that the cakes were still cold, but I think it would be the same for a room temp tier.

The cake had to be moved from the display room to the cutting room and it was easy peasy!! Even the caterers were impressed.
LL

leah_s Posted 17 Jul 2012 , 2:56pm
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lorieleann,
for a double height tier, you use a smaller plate and leg . For an 8" double height, you'd put a 6" plate in the middle,

mbn504 Posted 20 Jul 2012 , 9:36pm
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I am using the SPS for the first time tomorrow. 5 tier (14, 12, 10, 8 and 6") The cakes are already iced on the plates, but I'll have to put the border on at the reception site because there won't be much room to push the cake in if the border is added first. The bride wanted the 9" legs so they can put lots of flowers between each tier. I am a little concerned about the stability. I was planning to transport the cakes (unstacked of course) straight from the refrigerator, but just read where someone had problems with cracking while inserting the legs. Has anyone used the 9" legs without cutting and was the cake sturdy? Thank you!

leah_s Posted 9 Aug 2012 , 12:31am
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I personally always used the 5" leg + 1, 2" extension to create the airspace for flowers. That takes a lot of flowers. Using the 9" legs, it sort of looks like FLOWERS and cake, rather than CAKE and flowers,

You will put the plate and leg assembly into the tiers before you leave home. Yes, the plate will be sticking up in the air. Then when you get onsite, you will pick up each cake on it's cardboard and place it on the plate, and add your border.

Uhhh . . . what do you mean "the cakes are already iced on the plates." The SPS plates? No, that's not how you use this system. The cakes stay on their cardboards.

How do you propose to attach the legs to the plate and push the assembly into the tier?

#confused

mbn504 Posted 9 Aug 2012 , 2:22am
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Thank you Leah_s. I had never used the sps and learned as I went. I thought I could do everything, including the borders, before I went, but realized I would not have room to hold the plates and put them together. I ended up putting the border on as I set the cake up. I did put each cake on cardboard and then on the sps plate before I arrived. It worked out. I also agree that it was a lot of space for flowers, but that is what the bride wanted. This was the first cake I had ever done that had airspace and wasn't stacked. I learn each time what to do (or not to do). I love this site and the advice from those who are more experienced. Thanks again!

Smiller94 Posted 16 Aug 2012 , 11:16pm
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i have decided to go ahead and purchase the SPS system for my upcoming wedding cake I am doing for my brother which will be a 8, 10, 12, 14 & 16(syrofoam) cake. The cake pans I bought for this cake is the magicline 3 inch pans.

My question is before I buy the rods for the SPS system would the 4 inch rods be okay if I am planning on leveling & torting each layer? Would a 3 inch cake layered and torted be a 4 inch in the end?

or should I just plan on buying the taller rods and cutting them?

Thanks for the help

leah_s Posted 18 Aug 2012 , 6:19pm
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Hmmm . . . I thoroughly detest 3" pans and gave all mine away because I can't bake in them. So, I can't help much there. But the standard height of a tier is 4", so that's what you should be shooting for. If you can get your tier to 4", then the 4" legs are the ones to buy. That's why the manufacturer makes them 4". icon_smile.gif

Rosie2 Posted 1 Sep 2012 , 8:51pm
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Quote:
Originally Posted by leah_s

Hmmm . . . I thoroughly detest 3" pans and gave all mine away because I can't bake in them. So, I can't help much there. But the standard height of a tier is 4", so that's what you should be shooting for. If you can get your tier to 4", then the 4" legs are the ones to buy. That's why the manufacturer makes them 4". icon_smile.gif


One more time, thank you Leah for your awesome, wise advice!! you always rock icon_smile.gifthumbs_up.gif

And yes, at one point I thought I'd be saving time so, I bought a whole set of 3" pans thumbsdown.gif --fast forward a year later...now I have a whole set of 2" pans which I totally love cuz I know I'm always gonna have 4" tiers every time, yaayyy! thumbs_up.gif

mysticalmomentsindia Posted 19 Oct 2012 , 3:55pm
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Thanks for your advice!!! This is awesome!!!



Gudluck...!!!

mfruchey Posted 22 Oct 2012 , 6:14pm
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I have been meaning to try SPS for quite some time but am going to be doing my first wedding cake this month and don't think I can put it off any longer.

After reading several pages of this thread and the tutorial, it seems....really simple. Am I missing something? I'm going to try to go back and read the entire thread, but I think that's gonna take WEEKS. Anyone got an *quick* tips? (I'm doing a 10", 12", 14", 16")

Thanks in advance!

saapena Posted 22 Oct 2012 , 6:32pm
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It is that simple! I used it for a 3-tier wedding cake (my first and only since I am a hobby baker and this was my gift to the couple) and put it together at home and delivered ready to go! That cake didn't budge! I always use SPS for any stacked cake I do!

mfruchey Posted 23 Oct 2012 , 3:08am
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Awesome. Thanks for the input!

LoriMc Posted 30 Oct 2012 , 1:25pm
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I apologize if this has been covered in the thread.  I searched for "3 layer" but didn't see the reply I needed. 

 

I need to make one of those taller than normal cakes, with three rounds instead of 2.  How do you guys use the SPS in cakes like this?  Do you just stack the third on top and then ice over the plate and everything?

 

Did that make any sense?  Here is a pic of the cake I need to make.  Hope it attaches!

400

LoriMc Posted 30 Oct 2012 , 1:25pm
post #476 of 584

I apologize if this has been covered in the thread.  I searched for "3 layer" but didn't see the reply I needed. 

 

I need to make one of those taller than normal cakes, with three rounds instead of 2.  How do you guys use the SPS in cakes like this?  Do you just stack the third on top and then ice over the plate and everything?

 

Did that make any sense?  Here is a pic of the cake I need to make.  Hope it attaches!

400

LoriMc Posted 30 Oct 2012 , 1:28pm
post #477 of 584

I apologize if this has been covered in the thread.  I searched for "3 layer" but didn't see the reply I needed. 

 

I need to make one of those taller than normal cakes, with three rounds instead of 2.  How do you guys use the SPS in cakes like this?  Do you just stack the third on top and then ice over the plate and everything?

 

Did that make any sense?  Here is a pic of the cake I need to make.  Hope it attaches!

400

LoriMc Posted 30 Oct 2012 , 1:28pm
post #478 of 584

I apologize if this has been covered in the thread.  I searched for "3 layer" but didn't see the reply I needed. 

 

I need to make one of those taller than normal cakes, with three rounds instead of 2.  How do you guys use the SPS in cakes like this?  Do you just stack the third on top and then ice over the plate and everything?

 

Did that make any sense?  Here is a pic of the cake I need to make.  Hope it attaches!

400

crazygrammie Posted 16 Jan 2013 , 11:40pm
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ok, finally made it through all 32 pages and I'm sold. i am doing my first 5 tier - 18,14, 10, 7 and 5. the design doesn't look like its going to be easy to stack part of it at the venue and put on borders as it has drapes.  do you think it's possible that 1 woman and 1 man could lift this cake?

Dayti Posted 16 Jan 2013 , 11:55pm
post #480 of 584
Quote:
Originally Posted by crazygrammie 

ok, finally made it through all 32 pages and I'm sold. i am doing my first 5 tier - 18,14, 10, 7 and 5. the design doesn't look like its going to be easy to stack part of it at the venue and put on borders as it has drapes.  do you think it's possible that 1 woman and 1 man could lift this cake?

 

You won't regret using SPS. I can lift a 4 tier 6, 8, 10, 12. Not sure I could carry it very far though, I tend to use a cart. My husband can lift and carry an 8, 10, 12, 14. The only 5 tier I've done was stacked at the venue because I didn't want to chance it. I'm pretty sure between 2 people your cake can be lifted, and carried. Or, get a cart. Also, make sure you get a really sturdy base board for that cake. If they have organised a huge cake table it may be tricky getting the cake centered on it, because you can't just push the cake around. And try and check how far from the cake table you can park, and if you have steps, stairs and narrow doors to negotiate!

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