I Can't Have A Licensed Kitchen!!

Business By kutabby Updated 21 Sep 2008 , 3:56pm by paulstonia

kutabby Posted 19 Sep 2008 , 10:08pm
post #1 of 16

My week just keeps getting worse!!
I just talked to a lady from the county health department and she informed me that I can't do my business w/out a seperate kithcen. I'm so pissed!!! I called the department of agriculture about 2 months ago to make sure that starting my business would be ok and they gave me the go-ahead. So, off I go on my merry way! The orders are starting to really build up. Then, I read something on here about how KS doesn't allow home based food businesses. So, I get in touch w/ a friend of mine that does catering. She tells me that yes, you do have to have a seperate kitchen and she had been doing it illegally for 2 years. She gave me the name and number of the lady she had gotten her information from. So, I finally get ahold of her and she ruins my day/week/month/year! I'm so pissed!!! I never would have even gotten started had I known this! I can't rent space in a kitchen, or remodel my house. I wanted to do this business b/c I stay home w/ my kids and I could do it w/ them around. Now what? I've got order through the rest of the year! I'm just so pissed!

15 replies
littlecake Posted 19 Sep 2008 , 10:18pm
post #2 of 16

well ya'll don't flame me...

why not just fly under the radar?

during that time you can save money out of your business to add on a kitchen at your house...things don't have to cost a fortune, i'm all cash, it's amazing what you can do if you set your mind to it.

it can be done.

holoien003 Posted 19 Sep 2008 , 10:55pm
post #3 of 16

Alberta is the same way....frustrating....I try to remember to get names everytime I call anywhere...especially with the government!


Stick it to the man!

katefrosting Posted 20 Sep 2008 , 12:35am
post #4 of 16

Some rabble rousing cake decorators should get together and lobby their respective state legislators and/or county board of supervisors for at least an exemption for a small business person to get a start. How is it different from the host of an event making the cake at home and serving it? One word, "money." Unlike other food preparation, there is very little that gets touched by hand. Think about it.

kutabby Posted 20 Sep 2008 , 8:37pm
post #5 of 16

Oh, she did tell me that I was allowed to go to the client's home and do the baking. Are you kidding me?!? Besides, how is that really any different?

ladyonzlake Posted 20 Sep 2008 , 8:40pm
post #6 of 16

I think fly under the radar and look for somewhere to rent. I recently got lucky and found an add on Craigs List. It's a shared community kitchen 30 minutes from me. I pay $290 a month for 40 hours.

CindiM Posted 20 Sep 2008 , 8:57pm
post #7 of 16

See if your catering friend wants to rent a space together, so you will both be legal. It is just an idea. A lot of landlords are pretty hungry right now due to the economy. My landlord gave me 1 month free rent and a low rent just to get me in to a shopping center that had lost most of it's tenants. That was 7 years ago. Draw up a lease on your terms.

Mizuki Posted 20 Sep 2008 , 9:25pm
post #8 of 16

I feel your pain. It's the same here, too. I have been running around like a chicken with my head cut off trying to make it work, but it is just an exercise in futility. icon_mad.gif
Right now, I'm donating all my work to the local women's shelter (maybe I'll get some publicity and an opportunity will present itself?), and other than that I'm stuck just baking for family and friends. thumbsdown.gif
I wish you luck!! If you find a solution, let the rest of us poor saps know, would ya?! thumbs_up.gif

carmenid Posted 20 Sep 2008 , 9:26pm
post #9 of 16

Someone I know, that's licensed to bake from home, was just required to have all her cake baking/ decorating supplies separated from her regular kitchen stuff. She didn't have to have a different refrigerator, stove or oven to run her business.

What does having a separate kitchen entails?

I am guessing this varies from state to state?

drowsyrn Posted 20 Sep 2008 , 9:45pm
post #10 of 16

Before you fly under the radar, think of your family. Is it worth risking your home and all your personal assets if someone decides to sue you (your "company") because they got sick from one of your cakes and you are doing this illegally from your home? Your homeowners insurance will not cover your personal assets if you are not a legal business. Is it worth the risk? I know you are upset but the consequences of doing this illegally can have devastating effects on you and your family.

Some may say, oh it is just a cake, but if you get hooked up with the wrong customer... the sky can be the limit for them. I guess the risk is different for everyone. For me, it would not be worth it.
Think this one through.

summernoelle Posted 20 Sep 2008 , 9:50pm
post #11 of 16
Quote:
Originally Posted by kutabby

Oh, she did tell me that I was allowed to go to the client's home and do the baking. Are you kidding me?!? Besides, how is that really any different?




Yes-you can do that in TX, too! It's called being a "Personal Chef". I have a caterer friend who does that...I think it's a little bit of a loop hole, but I wish I knew more about it.

Kitagrl Posted 20 Sep 2008 , 10:05pm
post #12 of 16

Many people bake illegally, lying low, before they have the money to start legally. Most people will not build a kitchen or whatever and THEN start from scratch with clients. Most try to get a certain amount of clients started to make sure its going to work out. I have heard of prominent bakers who started "illegally". You just go via word of mouth and don't make a big deal of yourself until you get legal.

Carmen, I'm in PA and it is legal to do it from home here...maybe your friend is in PA?

drowsyrn Posted 20 Sep 2008 , 10:30pm
post #13 of 16

Of course it can be done from the home illegally and you may never get caught. You probably WON'T ever get caught. The question is......is it worth the risk for you individually? It's funny that it always seems to be the licensed people who say go ahead and do it illegally! I would like to hear from the illegals and see if the worry is worth it. Do you worry with each order you take, when each order goes out the door and so on?
Is it worth it? It CAN be done, it is your choice HOW you do it.

Back to topic, I wish I had words to make you feel less discouraged but I know how it is. A lot of us have been there. I think you will get that motivation back shortly and figure out a way to make this work for you and your family. Good luck!

carmenid Posted 21 Sep 2008 , 3:37pm
post #14 of 16
Quote:
Originally Posted by summernoelle

Quote:
Originally Posted by kutabby

Oh, she did tell me that I was allowed to go to the client's home and do the baking. Are you kidding me?!? Besides, how is that really any different?



Yes-you can do that in TX, too! It's called being a "Personal Chef". I have a caterer friend who does that...I think it's a little bit of a loop hole, but I wish I knew more about it.




You could make someone sick out of your kitchen, couldn't you make someone sick out of the clients kitchen as well?? what is the difference?

carmenid Posted 21 Sep 2008 , 3:42pm
post #15 of 16
Quote:
Originally Posted by Kitagrl

Many people bake illegally, lying low, before they have the money to start legally. Most people will not build a kitchen or whatever and THEN start from scratch with clients. Most try to get a certain amount of clients started to make sure its going to work out. I have heard of prominent bakers who started "illegally". You just go via word of mouth and don't make a big deal of yourself until you get legal.

Carmen, I'm in PA and it is legal to do it from home here...maybe your friend is in PA?




My friend is in VA. I don't know about PA, I am in NJ, it is illegal here.

This is a hobby for me, I have made a couple of wedding cakes for friends as GIFTS. I had a scare with my last one because the first thing that that country club manager (where the wedding was going to be held ) asked was for my tax number. I have been paranoid about that ever since.

paulstonia Posted 21 Sep 2008 , 3:56pm
post #16 of 16
Quote:
Originally Posted by ladyonzlake

I think fly under the radar and look for somewhere to rent. I recently got lucky and found an add on Craigs List. It's a shared community kitchen 30 minutes from me. I pay $290 a month for 40 hours.



What a great idea. I'm from the bay area, where craigslist actually started, I never thought to look on there for something like this. I use it for everything else. It's such a great site. If I'm on the computer it's either CC or craigslist thumbs_up.gif

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