Working With Spackle Paste

Decorating By staceyboots Updated 23 Sep 2008 , 8:15am by chutzpah

staceyboots Posted 19 Sep 2008 , 4:16pm
post #1 of 13

Hi everyone,

In Toba Garrett's book "The Well Decorated Cake", she recommends covering the cake with a spackle paste (mixture of cake crumbs, buttercream and preserves) before covering the cake with fondant. Apparently, using the spackle paste provides a smooth surface for the fondant and you wouldn't see the frosting between the layers.

In her book, she takes the spackled cake out of the fridge, added another thin layer of buttercream and then covered the cake with the fondant. I found it strange that there was no mention of allowing the cake to dry from any condensation before covering.

Has anyone ever used this technique before? Did you have to leave the spackled cake out on the counter first in order to get rid of any condensation or did you cover the cake straight away?

Please help...I have a spackled cake in the fridge at home and I don't want to ruin the fondant by covering the cake as soon as I take it out of the fridge.

TIA!!!

12 replies
PinkZiab Posted 19 Sep 2008 , 9:01pm
post #2 of 13

I never used this "spackle" technique, but I do refrigerate all of my cakes in between steps (after they are baked and cooled, then again after torting and filling to settle, then after crumb coat & final frost, and even when they are fully finished in fondant) and I have never waited... I roll out the fondant, take the cake out of the fridge, cover, smooth, trim, and back into the fridge it goes.

debster Posted 19 Sep 2008 , 9:09pm
post #3 of 13

Pinkziab.......................does the fondant sweat after taking it out of the refridge? I worry about it getting sticky. Thanks

mamacc Posted 20 Sep 2008 , 12:32am
post #4 of 13

The spackle won't be any different than regular cake or buttercream as far as covering it goes...

I've used it before, but not on the entire cake. I mostly use it on carved cakes to fill in areas that need it.

DianeLM Posted 20 Sep 2008 , 12:42am
post #5 of 13

I use this technique, except I don't top my spackle with buttercream. You actually WANT the condensation. That's what helps the fondant stick to the cake. When I put the fondant on my cake, it actually feels dry to the touch. This gives me plenty of time to fuss with the fondant before the condensation seeps through and makes the fondant stick.

I try not to refrigerate my cakes any longer than an hour or two because if they get too cold, condensation will form on the outside of the fondant. It's not a big deal, but could lead to problems. Ideally, I just put them in the freezer for about 20-30 minutes. That way, the outside of the cake is good and firm, but the inside is still room temp.

If you do get condensation on the outside of your fondant, DO NOT TOUCH IT! Just let it air dry naturally. It may take a couple of hours.

staceyboots Posted 21 Sep 2008 , 11:27am
post #6 of 13

thanks for the tips, diane! sadly, i had the same problem again last night. I rolled out the fondant, took the cake out of the fridge and covered it with the fondant. i then set the cake by a fan and waited for the condensation to blow off.

a couple of hours later, the fondant was still sticky (lots of condensation) and it looked as though it was actually starting to melt! do you think that the recipe was the problem because i covered a spackled cake using wilton's fondant recipe last weekend without any problems...i used Michele Foster's recipe this time around.

thanks in advance for any advice.

DianeLM Posted 22 Sep 2008 , 10:15pm
post #7 of 13

Yikes! I don't know why that happened. I've never used Michelle's fondant recipe, so I have no idea if that caused the problem.

I use FondX and Satin Ice only.

PinkZiab Posted 22 Sep 2008 , 10:49pm
post #8 of 13

I use only satin ice and I don't have problems with stickiness. There's usually only condensation if the room is very hot, but I tend to have the AC cranking when I am decorating. Even when there is a little condensation it usually evaporates rather quickly without ill effects. I keep my cakes in the refrigerator anytime they are not being worked on, as well as once they are done until pick up or delivery.

staceyboots Posted 23 Sep 2008 , 2:29am
post #9 of 13

thanks for your input guys!

next time, i will try placing the spackled cake in an air-conditioned room after taking it out of the fridge to dry up any condensation and then cover it with fondant.

thanks again!

lutie Posted 23 Sep 2008 , 3:07am
post #10 of 13

I use the spackle to help with a problem where the cake needs to hold together (like the other night when I was splitting a sheet cake to put in my strawberry butter cream filling and I dropped a section of the top... ahhh! This only occurs when I have been awake for more than 24 hours working in cakes icon_smile.gif ). It worked great!

I never, ever, never, ever put fondant in the refrigerator. Butter cream, but never fondant. It must stay dry with no condensation. I only use the MF fondant... the others have an "abusive" flavor... they insult my taste buds and my cake flavors. The MF is the best and the flavor is of my making... not somebody's decision in a factory. My name is on the cake; not satin ice's or wilton's.

No disrespect to any of the cake professionals, but all my life and with my teaching of food preparation, I have never told anyone to put a fondant-covered cake in the refrigerator. That is the way I was educated, and life experiences have taught me that is correct. Fondant was designed to keep a cake fresh due to its coverage... it should never have moisture or condensation around it... Butter cream is all that should touch it.

If you get a chance, watch the Sugar Shack video on Fondant. It will tell you exactly how to treat the fondant.

Pastrywiz.com says that after you put on the fondant:
"Leave cake to dry in a warm dry place. The kitchen is not suitable due to moisture from cooking etc... if the only room available is the dining room it may be advisable to buy a cardboard cake box to help keep the dust off (or the family), but still let the moisture out."

Hope that helps!

Gefion Posted 23 Sep 2008 , 7:52am
post #11 of 13
Quote:
Originally Posted by lutie



No disrespect to any of the cake professionals, but all my life and with my teaching of food preparation, I have never told anyone to put a fondant-covered cake in the refrigerator. That is the way I was educated, and life experiences have taught me that is correct. Fondant was designed to keep a cake fresh due to its coverage... it should never have moisture or condensation around it... Butter cream is all that should touch it.




And then again, some of us, who lives in countries where perishable cream fillings are the norm, have no choice, and never have problems with refridgerated fondant. I have put my lambeth cakes in the fridge. Yes, it might get condensation, but as long as you keep it in a cardboard box, it will not melt. Unless you have a super humid fridge, in which case you should get it checked out.

chutzpah Posted 23 Sep 2008 , 8:08am
post #12 of 13

I have a 'dry refrigerator'. Absolutely no moisture at all from the fridge.

Personally, as making and decorating a cake is a process that takes several days, and not an hour, I'd rather refrigerate the cake in between the steps, instead of leaving it out for three days.

When the dry fridge is full I've even put fondant cakes in the regular fridge, in a box, of course.

Oh, BTW, I'm a cake professional.

chutzpah Posted 23 Sep 2008 , 8:15am
post #13 of 13

Gah. I forgot why I wanted to post.

When I first got Toba's book I tried the spackle method a couple of times, but quickly discarded it.

I found it to be an extra, unnecessary, step. It was a waste of time for me.

Quote by @%username% on %date%

%body%