Cake Pricing Again

Decorating By shelli72 Updated 19 Sep 2008 , 12:35am by shelli72

shelli72 Posted 18 Sep 2008 , 12:57am
post #1 of 8

I was asked to do my first large cake for a shower. It needs to feed 60 people the design she wants includes some fondant and buttercream. I have no idea what to charge because I have only done smaller cakes for paying customers and those I believe I undercharge for. Any help will be appreciated.

thanks

7 replies
Cake_Princess Posted 18 Sep 2008 , 2:28am
post #2 of 8
Quote:
Originally Posted by shelli72

I was asked to do my first large cake for a shower. It needs to feed 60 people the design she wants includes some fondant and buttercream. I have no idea what to charge because I have only done smaller cakes for paying customers and those I believe I undercharge for. Any help will be appreciated.

thanks




I have said this on numerous occasions and I think I will probably die saying this. It's next to impossible to get online and ask other people what to charge and get a true answer. The reason being price will vary based on your market. It will also vary based on what you paid for ingredients and the complexity of the design. Even more important, it will vary based on what you want to be compensated for your time. Having said that, sit and figure out what it cost you to make the cake. Then factor in what you want to pay yourself for making the cake.

Remember Colette or Duff will not get online to ask what to charge. You work your price out and do not feel bad about getting paid for talent. You are providing a service and you deserve to be fairly compensated.

I hope this helps

FromScratch Posted 18 Sep 2008 , 2:40am
post #3 of 8

Very true CP..

I can tell you what I would charge, but everyone is different. I firmly believe though that if you are selling cakes for under $2/serving.. you are basically giving your work away. I charge $4.50/serving for buttercream and would throw in mild fondant decos without upping th cost.

Make sure that you are charging for the amount of cake you are making too.. not just the amount they need. If they want a HUGE cake that would serve 100 but they only need to serve 60.. they pay for all 100 servings.

Cake Princess gave good advice.. sit down and calculate what your ingredients cost you and figure out how long it takes you to make your cake. Then you can get a better idea of what you have to make to cover your costs and time.

Kitagrl Posted 18 Sep 2008 , 2:45am
post #4 of 8

You can also call around and see what the local cake shops are charging (not the store bakeries). That way you can get a feel for what people are paying locally.

FromScratch Posted 18 Sep 2008 , 12:02pm
post #5 of 8

You do have to be careful when getting quotes from bakeries (even the non-grocery store ones) since they tend to get their ingredients in bulk and their costs can be lower.

Cake_Princess Posted 18 Sep 2008 , 5:46pm
post #6 of 8
Quote:
Originally Posted by jkalman

You do have to be careful when getting quotes from bakeries (even the non-grocery store ones) since they tend to get their ingredients in bulk and their costs can be lower.




This is very true. thumbs_up.gif

moxey2000 Posted 18 Sep 2008 , 6:04pm
post #7 of 8

I have started using Alice's cake pricing matrix. It's an excel spreadsheet that is very detailed and works out your costs for you. It takes a little time to master, but once you understand how it all works it's really quite simple. Do a search on CC for 'cake pricing matrix'. Download the file, then save it to another file name. Always keep a master copy that you haven't made any changes to, otherwise you might mess up your original file.

shelli72 Posted 19 Sep 2008 , 12:35am
post #8 of 8

thanks everyone for all your help!

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