Cake Support

Decorating By cookieswithdots Updated 18 Sep 2008 , 3:16am by cookieswithdots

cookieswithdots Posted 15 Sep 2008 , 9:24pm
post #1 of 20

I am looking for some really good information on stacking an upcoming cake. 14, 10 and 6. I've read all that I can on various sites but I'm still confused icon_sad.gif. It seems to me like the dowls would be ok, but I'm just not sure. I am planning on using fondant by the way. I will be transporting the cake a short distance too.

I think this is a really good question, and I'm sure there are lots of different opinions, experiences, etc.

Pls feel free to share.

Thanks!
Melissa

19 replies
kakeladi Posted 15 Sep 2008 , 9:56pm
post #2 of 20

Yes, you can use dowels.
I use plastic drink straws for that size cake. You could use both - if you can find fat straws slip the dowels into the straws....dbl support and you won't get the wood taste dowels can leave in moist cake.

You don't say if the cake is stacked or pillared....
If you want to invest in SPS it would be great but not sure you can obtain them in time....
BakeryCrafts has plastic plate & 4 pillar sets. The pillars come in 4" size - that will replace the dowels & be *very* sturdy/safe. Maybe your local cake supply shop carried them....places like MIchael's won't.

cookieswithdots Posted 15 Sep 2008 , 11:12pm
post #3 of 20

The cake will be stacked. The wedding is Oct. 4th. I might have time to order. I wondered about this type of support system. I do not want to have any problems at all with this. I try and really plan out my projects and don't want any surprises, even though we always have them.

Meilissa

Deb_ Posted 16 Sep 2008 , 12:16am
post #4 of 20

Hi,
I've had really good luck with the Wilton hidden pillars and plates for my stacked cakes. I was so excited last night when I was watching Amazing Cakes on the WE Network and they were using the same thing to stack and support their huge Wedding Cake, which they were transporting assembled.

That made me feel confident in my choice of support/stacking system, to see professional decorators at their level using the same thing that I do.

The best part is you can buy it all at Michael's or Joann fabrics, for your size cakes....under $10 (less if you use a coupon). Always available and you don't have to pay shipping. icon_biggrin.gificon_biggrin.gificon_biggrin.gificon_biggrin.gificon_biggrin.gif

cookieswithdots Posted 16 Sep 2008 , 2:47am
post #5 of 20

I saw that too! I think you're right and I'm going to give them a try.

I think that this is a great topic and see lots of posts about it.

Thanks
Melissa

cookieswithdots Posted 16 Sep 2008 , 2:48am
post #6 of 20

I saw that too! I think you're right and I'm going to give them a try.

I think that this is a great topic and see lots of posts about it.

Thanks
Melissa

iamlis Posted 16 Sep 2008 , 2:57am
post #7 of 20

Well, I don't want to be a downer icon_sad.gif BUT...they weren't using Wilton's hidden pillars they were using SPS-which is kinda similair EXCEPT SPS plates lock into the cake boards. I ONLY say this because for years I have used Hidden Pillars I LOVED THEM! Then this summer I drove one across town and it was destroyed. The difference is, SPS has a pic that sticks up through the cardboard and you can transport it, with wilton you take the risk transporting it. It only takes one ruined cake to learn that mistake! LOL! But the Cake Diva's in CA use the SPS system when they transported that big ol honking cake!

luelue1971 Posted 16 Sep 2008 , 4:29am
post #8 of 20

How did they put the dowel in the top cake?

Deb_ Posted 16 Sep 2008 , 11:42am
post #9 of 20
Quote:
Originally Posted by iamlis

Well, I don't want to be a downer icon_sad.gif BUT...they weren't using Wilton's hidden pillars they were using SPS-which is kinda similair EXCEPT SPS plates lock into the cake boards. I ONLY say this because for years I have used Hidden Pillars I LOVED THEM! Then this summer I drove one across town and it was destroyed. The difference is, SPS has a pic that sticks up through the cardboard and you can transport it, with wilton you take the risk transporting it. It only takes one ruined cake to learn that mistake! LOL! But the Cake Diva's in CA use the SPS system when they transported that big ol honking cake!




I had this DVR'd and just watched it again to be sure. It is the same Plastic plate/fluted dowel's that I get from Michael's by Wilton. I am talking about the 5 tier fondant covered cake they did, where the girl asked if she remembered to put the skewer in the top tier. She makes a black mark in the pillars and cuts them with a pliars type thing. The four pillars lock into the plate and go through the entire tier.

If this is SPS, (which I've never seen, but from what I've read on CC SPS plates have a notch that the above tier locks into, the ones they used on this episode were completely flat with no notch, like the Wilton ones) Notice this when she is explaining the system, she runs her hand over the smooth plate.
I can tell you I achieve that same thing with these plastic fluted pillars and plastic plates. I just looked at a new package I bought and the correct name is fluted plastic pillars, not hidden pillars like I originally posted, sorry.

Isn't SPS made of metal with adjustable legs or is that something different I'm thinking of?

luelue1971 Posted 16 Sep 2008 , 11:50am
post #10 of 20

Sps plates are white plastic just like the Wilton plates. I have to agree I think she was using the SPS.

I was unsure of it the first time I watched the episode but last night when she turned the plate over you can see an x on the bottom of the plate and my SPS has those but my Wilton doesn't.

SPS has the legs that lock into place like the Wilton and the notch on the top is not very big so it could be hard to see on TV.

I really like the SPS. They are disposable and cheaper than Wiltons.

vrmcc1 Posted 16 Sep 2008 , 12:09pm
post #11 of 20

I use SPS the "notch on top" in a little nub that sticks up in the middle of the plastic plate. You push your cardboard circle onto the plate to make a little hole in the bottom of it before you decorate your cake on it then after the cake is decorate you set it on the plastic plate and the nub fits in to the hole you made in the cardbord and it helps to keep your cake from slipping off of the plastic plates.
What the girls on tv were using was not SPS there was no nub and the pillars on the SPS system are not smooth like the ones they used. They were using pipe cutters to cut the pillars but i dont know if they will work to cut the SPS since they are not smooth like the Wilton ones.

Deb_ Posted 16 Sep 2008 , 1:07pm
post #12 of 20
Quote:
Originally Posted by vrmcc1

I use SPS the "notch on top" in a little nub that sticks up in the middle of the plastic plate. You push your cardboard circle onto the plate to make a little hole in the bottom of it before you decorate your cake on it then after the cake is decorate you set it on the plastic plate and the nub fits in to the hole you made in the cardbord and it helps to keep your cake from slipping off of the plastic plates.
What the girls on tv were using was not SPS there was no nub and the pillars on the SPS system are not smooth like the ones they used. They were using pipe cutters to cut the pillars but i dont know if they will work to cut the SPS since they are not smooth like the Wilton ones.




O.k, I'm wearing out my DVR icon_lol.gificon_lol.gif Just watched again and the pillars they used were not smooth, look closely, they are fluted. The plates are completely smooth. I have a 57" hdtv, so it's easy for me to see the details of this thing, and I don't see any difference from what I use.
BTW, I did a google search on SPS and finally I know what it looks like. ( I don't know what that metal support system is that I've heard of before.)
SPS does look a lot like the Wilton stuff and it says on their web that some of the plates "may" have a notch in them to lock the cakeboard. onto. "May have" isn't that the difference? Now, I'm really confused icon_confused.gif

luelue1971 Posted 16 Sep 2008 , 1:11pm
post #13 of 20

I think it is possible that they are using something else that is not Wilton or SPS

I still would like to know how to get the dowel in the top.

Deb_ Posted 16 Sep 2008 , 5:18pm
post #14 of 20

Hi luelue, Alright, this is absolutely the last time I'm watching this part of the episode........just kidding. DVR's are awesome!

They only put a skewer in the top tier, a short one.....I'm not sure what the purpose of that was though, because it just hits the plastic plate and what the heck good will a skewer do icon_confused.gif ?

Oh well, so far I've had very good luck with these plates/pillars, although I never deliver an assembled cake that is taller than 2 tiers. (mostly because my DH usually drives and he doesn't know the meaning of SLOW and EASY on the corners) I mostly assemble on site.
Luckily, I've never had an incident and I've used them since at least 1988. Watch, now I'll jinx myself icon_cry.gif I guess we have to go with what we're comfortable with and so far I've had no reason to personally change my support system.

I think I will look into maybe drilling a small hole in each plate and from the bottom somehow attach a short pointed dowel/skewer to stick into the upper cake board, hummmm now my thinking cap is on icon_wink.gificon_razz.gificon_razz.gif

mjarvis78 Posted 16 Sep 2008 , 5:34pm
post #15 of 20

I use sps at home and at work (I work pt at a local grocery store doing wedding cakes).

I may not being reading the other messages right, but there is no need for a center dowel.

luelue1971 Posted 16 Sep 2008 , 5:39pm
post #16 of 20
Quote:
Originally Posted by dkelly27

They only put a skewer in the top tier, a short one.....I'm not sure what the purpose of that was though, because it just hits the plastic plate and what the heck good will a skewer do icon_confused.gif ?




Exactly what I was thinking.

cookieswithdots Posted 17 Sep 2008 , 4:30pm
post #17 of 20

After spending a lot of time reading the posts here and other places, I ordered the SPS online. I hope this will be what I'm looing for. It amazes me how many different ways there are to do things. Since this is my first wedding cake, I want it to be ok. The cake is fairly plain, but the structure is the most important part to me.

Thanks for everyone's help.

Melissa

leah_s Posted 17 Sep 2008 , 5:33pm
post #18 of 20

I hope that maybe some who has my file will send it to melissa so that she has the instructions with pictures. We've been displaced as a result of Hurricane Ike. I don't have access to the computer where the file is stored.

luelue1971 Posted 18 Sep 2008 , 2:52am
post #19 of 20

I will Leah.

cookieswithdots Posted 18 Sep 2008 , 3:16am
post #20 of 20

Thanks for sending it! You guys are awesome to say the least. I was talking to a lady at Michael's the other day (she was new at this cake decorating stuff!) anyhoo- I told her about Cake Central. She couldn't wait to go home and log on.

Thanks again!!!!!icon_smile.gif))))))))))))
Melissa

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