Does "organic" Really Matter? Need Opinions

Baking By sugargirl4 Updated 17 Sep 2008 , 2:47am by indydebi

sugargirl4 Posted 15 Sep 2008 , 2:42pm
post #1 of 6

Hi ~
It's been a while since I last posted, and I have a new biz idea.

I'm thinking that I would bake everyone's favorite cookie, chocolate chip, along with other chocolate chip cookies such as thumbprints, kisses, bars, meringues, etc. Basically I would specialize in chocolate chip cookies!

I've seen several home-based companies online that offer cookies with organic ingredients. Does this make a product more attractive or does it really not matter? Do I need to search for places to get organic baking ingredients?

BTW, I live in a state where the cottage food laws apply, so this is something I can do from home.
It's just in the "research" phase now - thought I'd get opinions on it.

Thanks so much! icon_smile.gif


5 replies
mellormom Posted 15 Sep 2008 , 3:06pm
post #2 of 6

Now days a lot of moms want things organic. So it might be a good business strategy. The cost to get everything organic might be to much though and you might have to charge more for the cookies than you would like to.
I think it's a great idea. You could also do other kinds of cookies besides ones with chocolate to get the mom's who don't want there kids to have chocolate. (or the ones who don't like it. )
I just realized that I forgot about adults wanting them! LOL Can you tell I have a kid! icon_smile.gif

FromScratch Posted 15 Sep 2008 , 3:07pm
post #3 of 6

It really depends on the person I think. Some people see organic and are drawn to it and other see organc and assume it will taste like cardboard. Some people seek out organic foods and others could care less. I think if you focus more on natural ingredients you'd be better off at this point. Organic ingredients can be expensive and drive your costs up.

I would do some market research.. do you live in a area that has a big pull for organics? If not.. then I'd say don't bother. I use organic and non-organic things in my cooking and baking.. people tend to appreciate the fact that it's all made my hand rather than it contains organic ingredients.

kettlevalleygirl Posted 15 Sep 2008 , 3:09pm
post #4 of 6

Boy, I am thinking that you will get a lot of replies on this topic! I know and understand that "organic" is healthier and supposed to be a better way, but it is definately over-used, and people are taking advantage of it and calling things organic just to make $$ icon_eek.gif . It is the coin phrase of this day.
I will be watching this to see what everybody has to say! Good question. thumbs_up.gif

tx_cupcake Posted 15 Sep 2008 , 5:14pm
post #5 of 6

I'm of the opinion that you only benefit from eating certain organic foods, and others are just a product of hype. Thin skinned fruit and veggies, eggs and milk being a few that I feel are beneficial.

That being said, I think it's more realistic to go the "all natural" route, meaning your ingredients are "whole". That way you can advertise that your baked goodies contain minimally processed ingredients, don't contain preservatives, high fructose corn syrup, etc. You could use some organic ingredients (eggs, milk, etc.), but being "all natural" would probably save you some cost since organics can be pricey.

I also agree with jkalman about making sure that there is a real market for this type of thing in your area. A lot of people are of the frame of mind that junk food is junk food no matter what it's made from.

indydebi Posted 17 Sep 2008 , 2:47am
post #6 of 6

This question is a great example of the value of good marketing research. Some are for it, some don't care, some think it means 'blecky tasting' .... but you need to research your local market to find out what YOUR potential customers think of it and if it will fly in YOUR area.

Quote by @%username% on %date%