Help Me Word This Email - Long!

Business By MikeRowesHunny Updated 22 Sep 2008 , 2:16pm by -K8memphis

MikeRowesHunny Posted 10 Sep 2008 , 9:57pm
post #1 of 11

so I don't sound completely lame and like I don't know my arse from my elbow icon_cry.gificon_rolleyes.gif !

Today I got an enquiry for a corporate cake for the 19th. Needs to serve 150 people, one display cake (for 50ish), the rest of the servings pre-cut simple kitchen cakes. I worked out the cost, sent the woman a quote (after close of business).

Now, here's the thing - upon reflection, I really don't think I'm going to have the time/space to do these cakes. My birthday is on the 20th, I also have a 2 tier 50th birthday cake (serving 60), and a cupcake cake due on the 20th. I know it may sound wussy to some of you, but that's enough work for me next week (I also work part-time), and I'd actually like to enjoy my birthday and not be a worn-out wreck by then! I can't even bake ahead and freeze these corporate cakes, because I only have a small freezer available (I'm already baking and freezing my cake & the 50th cake this weekend).

Every time I try to write a mail to explain this to the woman from the corporation, it just sounds really lame & pathetic and like I don't know what I'm doing!

Please help me word a mail to her that doesn't leave me looking like an idiot! TIA!

10 replies
snarkybaker Posted 10 Sep 2008 , 10:09pm
post #2 of 11

Dear Corporate Lady,

Thank you for inquiring. Unfortunately our baking calendar for the week of the 20th is full, and I can't accommidate your order at this time.

For future reference, we typically can/cannot schedule cakes over 100 servings with 10 days notice, but next weekend just happens to be exceptionally busy.

Please be sure to let me know if I can help at any time in the future.

Best Regards,

Bon Jovi Babe

kathys90 Posted 10 Sep 2008 , 10:14pm
post #3 of 11

At this point all you've done is quote the job, you haven't accepted any down payment, or signed any contract.

I don't think that this corporate client needs to have all the details. I would just tell her that you've had a chance to review your schedule for that week, and although you appreciate her inquiry, you are booked solid. Maybe you could refer her to another decorator in your area...especially if she is in a tight spot. But I certainly wouldn't share any other information.

Hope this helps!

katefrosting Posted 11 Sep 2008 , 6:08am
post #4 of 11

Notify the person ASAP--before she sends you an acceptance. Give him/her enough time to find someone else to make the cake. If you want this company's business in the future, either do the cake or handle the cancellation in the most professional manner.

p.s. It might help to take a Business Law class at a Community College in your state to know whether or not a contract has been formed.

all4cake Posted 11 Sep 2008 , 6:40am
post #5 of 11

I agree with txkat.

But, I would wait for an email back from them before addressing the issue.

Should they respond with an order, I would then reply back stating that you accept orders on a first come-first serve basis and the date requested has been booked. (I just looked at your calendar) I'd be more than happy to fill the order for the 18th with possibly an evening pick-up/delivery. If you are interested in this time slot, I will need to be notified immediately.

If they include a contact number, call them and relay the above information....they would get the idea of the importance of time to your business.

JMHO

MikeRowesHunny Posted 11 Sep 2008 , 10:37am
post #6 of 11

Well, I wrote this at about 1am this morning:

Dear Katie,

I have just been checking through my schedule for next week and the orders I already have booked in will take up nearly all of my available time, so I won't be able take on your large order as well and do all the cakes justice (something that is very important to me).

If you would like to use my services in future for a large cake (50+ servings), then the more notice you can give me, the higher the chance I can accommodate your request. The availability calender on my website will usually indicate how busy I am.

Please accept my apologies for not being able to help you this time around.




I haven't heard back from her, but I did miss a call from someone this morning (I had my hands under a sheet of rolled fondant at the time, so couldn't answer and the caller didn't leave a message). I've changed my calendar because I really don't want anymore orders for the end of next week and I'm pretty busy with work Mon-Wed. Thanks for all your advice ladies!

snarkybaker Posted 11 Sep 2008 , 4:56pm
post #7 of 11
Quote:
Originally Posted by bonjovibabe

Well, I wrote this at about 1am this morning:

Dear Katie,

I have just been checking through my schedule for next week and the orders I already have booked in will take up nearly all of my available time, so I won't be able take on your large order as well and do all the cakes justice (something that is very important to me).

If you would like to use my services in future for a large cake (50+ servings), then the more notice you can give me, the higher the chance I can accommodate your request. The availability calender on my website will usually indicate how busy I am.

Please accept my apologies for not being able to help you this time around.




I haven't heard back from her, but I did miss a call from someone this morning (I had my hands under a sheet of rolled fondant at the time, so couldn't answer and the caller didn't leave a message). I've changed my calendar because I really don't want anymore orders for the end of next week and I'm pretty busy with work Mon-Wed. Thanks for all your advice ladies!




I have only one critique. You did not give this woman a way to be able to do business with you in the future. Your response of "if you give me a lot of notice, I might be able to do your cake". You should give her time frame that if she meets, she can definitely get a cake from you. Assistants who plan events want to get their plans made as efficiently as possible. Even if you say something like " 30 days notice suggested for cakes over 100 servings." It givers her an idea of how to do business with you, and if you say suggested, then she might very well call you if there are 15 days left until the event.

all4cake Posted 11 Sep 2008 , 5:31pm
post #8 of 11

Your suggested/desired/required lead times for various items are posted on your site. I really like that.

MikeRowesHunny Posted 21 Sep 2008 , 12:05pm
post #9 of 11

She replied a couple of days later saying that she appreciated my honesty and how I want to run my business, acknowledged that she had left it to the last minute, and said she would certainly keep me in mind for future orders. The purpose of my availability calendar is to see if I'm free, and the lead times on the home page clearly state how much notice people should consider giving me. It's not my fault if they can't be arsed to read that and then don't contact me until the last minute!

alvarezmom Posted 22 Sep 2008 , 1:53pm
post #10 of 11

Happy late Bday Bonjobibabe! Looks like it all worked out in the end.

-K8memphis Posted 22 Sep 2008 , 2:16pm
post #11 of 11

Yeah Happy Birthday, Cake-Buddy--hope it was great!

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