Hoping Someone Can Explain....

Decorating By jovigirl Updated 12 Sep 2008 , 12:06pm by banba

jovigirl Posted 9 Sep 2008 , 3:59pm
post #1 of 17

This past January, I finally made my first apple pie, after years of being intimidated by this I finally tried it. I used the recipe from the Martha Stewart Baking book & when the pie was made it looked exactly like the one in the book & the filling was also very delicious, however as I was hostinf a get together, i didn't get a piece of pie til much later & then noticed that the bottom crust was raw icon_eek.gificon_surprised.gificon_cry.gificon_eek.gificon_surprised.gificon_cry.gif
I followed the recipe to a tea, not missing any detail, can anyone explain why the bottom crust didn't bake & what I can do to prevent this from happening again?

Thank you

16 replies
lilyanddayne Posted 9 Sep 2008 , 4:07pm
post #2 of 17

My grandma always said to poke holes in the bottom crust before filling and bake just the bottom crust for 10 minutes at 325. Then fill and put top crust on and bake for what the recipe calls for.HTH

Homemade-Goodies Posted 9 Sep 2008 , 4:14pm
post #3 of 17

I don't think it could have absolutely NOT cooked, if it were in the oven the entire time and the top was cooked well. The point is that it won't of course get brown, and kind of soaks up the juices of the apple filling - I love it this way! In that soft way that it cooks, it can seem uncooked I suppose. Did your guests not eat the bottoms?

If you used this recipe, or similar http://www.marthastewart.com/recipe/apple-pie?autonomy_kw=apple%20pie&rsc=header_5 it should have cooked. Otherwise have your oven checked that your bottom element is working....

Best of luck to your next efforts!! icon_biggrin.gif

playingwithsugar Posted 9 Sep 2008 , 4:26pm
post #4 of 17

That's the dough recipe I use for all my pies, and they come out perfect every time.

I agree that you should get your oven checked.

Theresa icon_smile.gif

DebraDough Posted 9 Sep 2008 , 4:26pm
post #5 of 17

A lot depends on if your oven is the temperature it says it is on the dial. Another thing I do (I've been baking apple pies for about a hundred years) is I bake it on 400 for the first ten or fifteen minutes and then turn it down to 350. I rarely cook any of them the same amount of time. If the apples are really fresh and have a lot of juice it will make more juice and take a bit longer to cook. If they are older they don't make as much juice and everything cooks faster and can dry out faster. Just keep baking and eventually you will get the hang of it. Best of luck...Debra

darcat Posted 9 Sep 2008 , 4:29pm
post #6 of 17

It sounds like maybe your apples were too juicy and perhaps needed a thickener like corn starch. I always bake my in a glass pan as they brown the bottom of the pie 100 pct better than any other type of pan. Also as someone else suggested you can partially bake the bottom crust before filling it but with a glass pan this is not necessary. Just remember when blind baking (baking without a filling) remember to put pie weights so the crust doesnt shrink or puff up. I put aluminum foil over the crust then cover the bottom and ups the sides a bit with pennies they work great. Hope these tips help.

jovigirl Posted 9 Sep 2008 , 4:36pm
post #7 of 17
Quote:
Originally Posted by Homemade-Goodies

I don't think it could have absolutely NOT cooked, if it were in the oven the entire time and the top was cooked well. The point is that it won't of course get brown, and kind of soaks up the juices of the apple filling - I love it this way! In that soft way that it cooks, it can seem uncooked I suppose. Did your guests not eat the bottoms?

If you used this recipe, or similar http://www.marthastewart.com/recipe/apple-pie?autonomy_kw=apple%20pie&rsc=header_5 it should have cooked. Otherwise have your oven checked that your bottom element is working....

Best of luck to your next efforts!! icon_biggrin.gif




I really wish it ws cooked, but this dough was raw icon_cry.gif

jovigirl Posted 9 Sep 2008 , 4:41pm
post #8 of 17
Quote:
Originally Posted by darcat

It sounds like maybe your apples were too juicy and perhaps needed a thickener like corn starch. I always bake my in a glass pan as they brown the bottom of the pie 100 pct better than any other type of pan. Also as someone else suggested you can partially bake the bottom crust before filling it but with a glass pan this is not necessary. Just remember when blind baking (baking without a filling) remember to put pie weights so the crust doesnt shrink or puff up. I put aluminum foil over the crust then cover the bottom and ups the sides a bit with pennies they work great. Hope these tips help.




I did use a glass dish, but will try the prebaking with the pennies...

umabdurrahman Posted 9 Sep 2008 , 4:49pm
post #9 of 17

i always always always use an egg wash over the bottom crust before i add the filling IF the filling is juicy. they always come out great icon_smile.gif

buttercream_dreams Posted 9 Sep 2008 , 7:13pm
post #10 of 17
Quote:
Originally Posted by umabdurrahman

i always always always use an egg wash over the bottom crust before i add the filling IF the filling is juicy. they always come out great icon_smile.gif



this is exactly what i was going to say- in the pie and pastry bible, she says to do this with many of her pies and i always do, plus a little bit of prebaking (wether it calls for it or not) prior to the wash. i never bother to blind bake with any kind of weights (because i am lazy- and because it doesnt make that much of a difference that its worth it to me) unless i am using something like puff pastry.

Deb_ Posted 9 Sep 2008 , 10:20pm
post #11 of 17

In addition to poking holes in the bottom crust and an egg wash, I bake my pies in pyrex (glass) and I lower the oven rack to 1 below the middle of the oven. I too hate the "rawlike" bottom crust. It will never be as browned and dry as the top crust because it is sitting in the juices from the apples, but that's weird that it was raw.

I don't know what could have happened to yours, did you place a cookie sheet under the pie plate maybe? I know sometimes it bubbles over and makes a mess of the oven, but instead of a cookie sheet I use those oven liners under the heating element when I'm baking something that may over flow.

Better luck with your next pie thumbs_up.gif

LeanneW Posted 10 Sep 2008 , 1:22am
post #12 of 17

definately start at a higher temp for 15 mins then lower the temp.

congrats on doing something challenging and new. stick with it!

jovigirl Posted 11 Sep 2008 , 1:56am
post #13 of 17

Thank you all for your help!!!

Hopefully i'll have better luck with the next one icon_rolleyes.gif

mtaccts Posted 11 Sep 2008 , 3:02pm
post #14 of 17

Just a random thought - was the bottom crust thicker - maybe just trying rolling it a little thinner for the bottom

BellaSweet Posted 11 Sep 2008 , 3:22pm
post #15 of 17

icon_confused.gif I'm sorry, but pennies just sound gross! I know that when I am helping my daughter count out the change in her piggy bank, my hands always have that awful metallic smell. You just wanna wash your hands to get it off. And it's not that my money stinks, it's ALL money. I would definitely not want to eat a pie that was partially baked with pennies. I am sure that tht is just me. So please take this for my very small opinion.

mrsw Posted 11 Sep 2008 , 3:31pm
post #16 of 17

Well using pennies or beans to pre-bake the crust, I always put some foil over the dough - that way I can remove the weights easily when they are still hot. - Weird the bottom crust was raw - I've never had that problem - I agree with the others, check the temps in the oven and roll the dough a bit thinner but not too thin - a burnt crust is just as bad. Good luck and don't let this discourage you from trying again - pies are yumm and a nice change of pace from cake albeit not too often icon_lol.gif

banba Posted 12 Sep 2008 , 12:06pm
post #17 of 17

Yep I agree with the rest you need to "blind" bake the crust first using the dried beans or pricking the bottom with a fork. You can even buy special pastry beans for this purpose.

The filling can also make a cooked crust go soggy so sometimes you can crumble crushed cookies or something like that and sprinkle them over the cooked bottom before adding the filling.

When I am doing puff pastry that's going to be filled with fruit fillings I like to brush the bottom of the cooked pastry with melted choc before adding the fruit filling a fresh cream, it stops things getting soggy. HTH

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