Have Any Of You Ever Taught Classes (Informal Ones Not Wilto

Business By aprilcake Updated 14 Sep 2008 , 1:57pm by kettlevalleygirl

aprilcake Posted 8 Sep 2008 , 7:04pm
post #1 of 11

ok...i need your help! A girl I use to go to school with has contacted me and wants me to come to her church and teach a small-medium size group of people there some basic cake decorating skills in an informal setting! I have NEVER taught yet and I am afraid that I will not be able to tell them right because I seem to fumble my words a lot when I have to tell someone something.

So...what all should I teach them? I am guessing it will be a few hours. What should I not try with them? How should I go about everything? If you have any ideas or ways you have done it...PLEASE let me know! thanks so much!

April :0)

10 replies
SugarplumStudio Posted 8 Sep 2008 , 8:46pm
post #2 of 11

I teach basic cake decorating at free community interest classes at local libraries. It's really a lot of fun, so don't be nervous! First thing to remember is that someone taking a basic decorating class really knows nothing about decorating a cake, so they rarely have a certain expectation. YOU are the expert and trust me, whatever you say or do will be perceived as bible truth. LOL
I provide a list of specific tools and tips needed weeks in advance. My students purchase their own, but on occasion, I have pre-purchased everything and student purchase a kit from me. I provide the cakes and icing so that everyone has the same thing ( paid for by the library as part of my materials fee)
I always start out with basic cake baking tips to ensure level cakes, brushing off crumbs, etc. I bring my KA and demonstrate basic buttercream. You wouldn't believe how people react to how easy it is to make real icing!
I go through each step slowly, first explaining everything I'm going to do, then I go through and do it, explaining again, then follow up one more time explaining what I did. Then I go through each step again, this time with the class joining me step by step, assembling and icing the cake.
For decorating, I made a huge foam core board with colorful royal icing borders and flowers, in step by step process so that everyone has a constant visual. We practice borders, writing and easy flowers on a cake board first before going to the cake.
I've taught this class over and over, to 5 year old kids up to seniors. Just use everyday language and layman cake terms. Present it like a fun project and that's how people will respond to it. I found that the most important thing is to stress that no 2 cakes look alike, no matter how much experience you have, you only get better with practice and as soon as it isn't fun, you should stop doing it!!!
Hope that was helpful!

SugarplumStudio Posted 8 Sep 2008 , 8:46pm
post #3 of 11

I teach basic cake decorating at free community interest classes at local libraries. It's really a lot of fun, so don't be nervous! First thing to remember is that someone taking a basic decorating class really knows nothing about decorating a cake, so they rarely have a certain expectation. YOU are the expert and trust me, whatever you say or do will be perceived as bible truth. LOL
I provide a list of specific tools and tips needed weeks in advance. My students purchase their own, but on occasion, I have pre-purchased everything and student purchase a kit from me. I provide the cakes and icing so that everyone has the same thing ( paid for by the library as part of my materials fee)
I always start out with basic cake baking tips to ensure level cakes, brushing off crumbs, etc. I bring my KA and demonstrate basic buttercream. You wouldn't believe how people react to how easy it is to make real icing!
I go through each step slowly, first explaining everything I'm going to do, then I go through and do it, explaining again, then follow up one more time explaining what I did. Then I go through each step again, this time with the class joining me step by step, assembling and icing the cake.
For decorating, I made a huge foam core board with colorful royal icing borders and flowers, in step by step process so that everyone has a constant visual. We practice borders, writing and easy flowers on a cake board first before going to the cake.
I've taught this class over and over, to 5 year old kids up to seniors. Just use everyday language and layman cake terms. Present it like a fun project and that's how people will respond to it. I found that the most important thing is to stress that no 2 cakes look alike, no matter how much experience you have, you only get better with practice and as soon as it isn't fun, you should stop doing it!!!
Hope that was helpful!

lbass Posted 9 Sep 2008 , 7:58pm
post #4 of 11

I had the same thing happen to me this weekend. A lady at church wants me to show her and 5 other ladies how to do wilton course II. They were originally going to a lady 50 miles away from town and she was charging
$80 dollars a person!!! icon_eek.gif I'm thinking about it but I'm a little scared. I can hardly make a rose much less teaching someone how to do the victorian rose!

Good Luck in you decision.



lori

kettlevalleygirl Posted 9 Sep 2008 , 8:07pm
post #5 of 11

I was thinking of teaching non-wilton classes eventually in my small community. I am taking the Masters course at Wilton soon, but I have taken shorter more specific classes and have enjoyed them.
SugarplumStudio, you are right, I remember watching my first class and how I thought my teacher was a cake goddess, she could do no wrong!
(she really is, though, she is a trained pastry chef as well as a wilton instructor and she makes it all look very easy!)

LeanneW Posted 12 Sep 2008 , 6:01am
post #6 of 11

this topic caught my eye because I was considering offering a short, one or two hour, free cake decorating lesson through an organization here in seattle. (also sponsored by our public library)

I was trying to determine if I should do it more like a demonstration than a class, that way the "students" wouldn't need to bring supplies.

I was thinking of doing a theme demonstration, like Christmas cupcakes (at Christmas time), using accessable grocery store supplies.

I'll look into how much the students would have to purchase to make it hands on but I need to keep the expense low.

If anyone has any suggestions that would be great.

PJ37 Posted 12 Sep 2008 , 6:36am
post #7 of 11

I have taught a couple very informal classes and also gave a neighbor 1:1 lessons..."just for fun"...
I always find it helpful to have handouts, lists, etc. to pass out.
You could Go to:
http://www.wilton.com/decorating/decorating-basics/
for some ideas of what you might want to teach. Also, suggest Wilton.com and Cakecentral.com as resources if anyone is interested!

I usually bring supplies...buttercream, my own decorating bags and tips...I have always found it useful to demonstrate first, and then let them practice on wax paper and then let them decorate a final product of a cupcake or something similar! (I usually have these iced first). This usually lasts about 1 1/2 hrs.
Hope this helps!

kettlevalleygirl Posted 12 Sep 2008 , 1:48pm
post #8 of 11

Leannewinslow, I took a buttercream course and we had to bring our own equipment bought from the store the classes were at, and bring royal icing made to the right consistency. Way too complicated for the people attending, (I had already taken many courses, but wanted to take a local course at a local store just to brush up etc, because I don't do it as often as I would like).
If I were to do a course, I would bring the icing, and stick to a couple tips, and pick maybe two simple projects for them to take home and show off.
The Wilton page is great.
It will be fun!

LeanneW Posted 14 Sep 2008 , 5:51am
post #9 of 11

thank you kettlevalleygirl,

That is what I was thinking. I want it to be simple, not overwhelming.

I think I'll bring the frosting and bags and tips and have them bring blank cupcakes or something. I have lots of time to think this through. Maybe I'll practice on my friends and see what they think.

auntiecake Posted 14 Sep 2008 , 7:31am
post #10 of 11

I teach at the community college. Go for it! You will learn along with them no matter how much you know and will enjoy the sharing of ideas. Take it slow and stay in your comfort zone and you will be fine. Good Luck

kettlevalleygirl Posted 14 Sep 2008 , 1:57pm
post #11 of 11

What I do remember about my last course,(most the people had never picked up an icing bag), is to keep the projects very simple because the people tend to do it quite slowly, and are having fun so a whole lot doesn't get accomplished.

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