First Time With Fondant - Help With Questions?

Decorating By TNugs Updated 5 Sep 2008 , 5:49am by turtle3264

TNugs Posted 4 Sep 2008 , 7:38pm
post #1 of 5

I made some MMF last night. I want to make a thomas and friends birthday cake for my son for Saturday. I was going to make a cake like the one i saw on the gallery with the different train faces around the 9 inch bottom tier cake. Do i make the faces today and then do i let it sit out and dry or cover it so it stays soft? I want the face to mold to the curveture of the cake. I was just planning on making simple flat faces not 3D.

Also, should i let my BC crust before i put the fondant on?

Sorry for the elementary questions. I am SO new to this. Thanks!

4 replies
julitre1 Posted 4 Sep 2008 , 9:27pm
post #2 of 5

don't worry about asking any questions, that's how we all learn. I think I found the cake you were talking about. If you want the faces to mold to the shape of the cake I would put them on while they're soft. Also, I would put on an initial bc, let it crumb and then put on the second layer. Then I would put on the faces. Hope this helps.

leahhawaii Posted 5 Sep 2008 , 12:19am
post #3 of 5

I am new to fondant too and had a question about how far in advance to make fondant "embellishments". I am doing a Hawaii theme cake and am going to be putting simple fondant flowers (with flower cutter from Michaels) on a buttercream frosted cake. Should I do the flowers in advance and would a crusting v. non-crusting buttercream be better? Thanks!

julitre1 Posted 5 Sep 2008 , 1:51am
post #4 of 5

I would make them 3 days ahead of time and then put them on the cake. I have found, personally, that it is easier to put the embellishments on a freshly frosted cake. So, again, I would do the crumb coat, the second layer and then apply the embellishments. You can wait, you would just want to use a little water on the back of the embellishments to get them to stick.

turtle3264 Posted 5 Sep 2008 , 5:49am
post #5 of 5

If you need to make the faces ahead of time, you can wrap them in plastic wrap. They will stay soft until Saturday. You can also let them dry on a pan the same size as the cake, but that is sometimes tricky for me. Once you add the icing, the pan is not the exact same size as the iced cake. I did a Thomas cake like the one that you are talking about. But this was before I knew about the plastic wrap or the pan trick. So I let them dry flat and had to use a lot of icing to cover up the gaps.

Quote by @%username% on %date%

%body%