Roses: Bc Or Royal??

Decorating By loves2bake Updated 11 Oct 2008 , 1:41am by loves2bake

loves2bake Posted 4 Sep 2008 , 3:43am
post #1 of 58

For those or you that make your own roses for your cakes, please offer me your expertise. I have a wedding cake due at the beginning of Oct that has approximately 100 roses icon_eek.gif , For me that is A LOT! icon_surprised.gif
ANd so I need your help: Do I make these roses out of royal or BC? If I use BC, how long will they stay fresh?
It's probably a dumb question, but I have never had to make this many roses in my life!!
Thank you for your your help!

57 replies
tonedna Posted 4 Sep 2008 , 4:01am
post #2 of 58

I would say RI. that way you can do them ahead of time and they are easier to place in the cake. You can store them in a box after they dry completely and use them later. Just make sure to give them a few days to dry before storing them.
Edna icon_biggrin.gif

ChefJon Posted 4 Sep 2008 , 4:01am
post #3 of 58

My question to you is this: Are the roses going to be eaten with the cake or taken off. If they are going to be eaten I suggest making them at the MOST a week in advance. If they wont be offered on the plate up then make them out of royal. Those you can do a few weeks in advance.

CuteCakeName Posted 4 Sep 2008 , 4:16am
post #4 of 58

There is no reason to not serve royal icing roses with the cake. My husband and daughter love to eat those things! They are 100% edible, and I would definitely use RI so that you can make them way in advance and not have to stress when the cake is due. Be sure to make quite a few extras in case of breakage.

tonedna Posted 4 Sep 2008 , 4:18am
post #5 of 58

My son loves RI flowers too.. I would be more weirded out eating roses in buttercream that are a week old..No offense..

SugarFrosted Posted 4 Sep 2008 , 4:30am
post #6 of 58

I made an all buttercream 3 tier wedding cake, with all buttercream roses as the bottom border of each tier, at the beginning of August. I made a total of about 100 roses the day before the wedding and set them on trays to dry a bit and then apply to the cake after I set it up. They were firm, but still soft enough to eat. It was a ton of work, but I had planned for the time. I had hoped the roses would be served with the cake, but the person who cut the cake ignored the rose border on each tier. The roses got sent to the kitchen on the empty cake plate and were thrown away. That made me sad.
I have made buttercream roses far in advance to allow them to dry completely and they did just fine. I don't care for royal icing.

loves2bake Posted 4 Sep 2008 , 4:30am
post #7 of 58

I was worried too about making the BC roses so far in advance, but have heard that all that sugar in the icing acts as a preservative, I just wasnt sure for how long..
So I was thinking about using the RI, but the bride wants an IVORY cake. So how do you get that many roses the same color? icon_surprised.gif Howtheheckmuch icing will it take to make that many? icon_eek.gif How do you keep the RI moist enough to make that many roses over the course of the next few weeks, etc?

littlecake Posted 4 Sep 2008 , 5:05am
post #8 of 58

well it will be a great experiance doing that many, it will hone your skills.

i've done so many ...i think i can do one in about 30 seconds....listen, they really go so much faster...and nicer..IMHO...if you can master the stick method...you can flat whoop em out then....

there's a video on you tube...she's making purple roses....it really shows how fast you can do them (on the stick)...you'll love it after you master it.

xstitcher Posted 4 Sep 2008 , 6:16am
post #9 of 58

I agree with the majority to use RI. It's so much less stressful to have these done ahead of time. As for the ivory colour, you could just buy icing colour in ivory. I've just bought some myself this past weekend but have not had a chance to try it out. As for storing RI, you have to store it in an airtight container that has not come in contact with any grease (wash out all items with hot water and soap that will come in contact with RI as it will break down the icing).

My instructor taught us to also use a damp paper towel (wrung out really well) and put that on the icing followed by some saran wrap over the top of the container and then the lid. I think it lasts for a couple of weeks in the container if memory serves (I haven't used it in a while!).

P.S. My kids all love the stuff too! They think it's like eating candy!

all4cake Posted 4 Sep 2008 , 6:59am
post #10 of 58

Even if you have to make several batches, you should be able to match the color from batch to batch if you measure and jot down the exact amount of colorant used to make the first batch...whether it be 2 drops or 1/4 teaspoon of this, 4 drops of that....write it down as you add it...if you feel you have to add more...write it down.

For instance,(and this is by no means an actual blend) I'm making maroon: I add

1 teaspoon hot pink
2 drops brown

hmmm...needs something to deepen it somehow...

4 drops red red

looks about right. I allow it to rest, covered with a slightly damp towel for about an hour(colors intensify)

3 drops hot pink ...just right.

The next batch...
1 teaspoon plus 3 drops hot pink
2 drops brown
4 drops red red

It should give you the same results as the first batch.

As far as royal or b/c...I decide depending on how they'll be placed on the cake. I have better luck with r/i when they're on the sides of the cake and those I make as far in advance as possible and allow them to dry completely then store them in a container away from ANY lighting...some colors will fade more than others when exposed to lighting...direct or indirect. If they're to be placed on the tops/bases I use either depending on the projected time leading up to the day of decorating that cake.

indydebi Posted 4 Sep 2008 , 11:54am
post #11 of 58

I use BC for everything. My icing sits out on the counter (in a covered container) for a couple weeks or more. BC roses can be made a week or a day ahead of time, AIR DRIED (!), and placed on the cake just fine, as an earier poster mentioned.

Once you get into the flow of rose-making, you can probably whip those out in way less time than you think.

Not sure why someone would be "weirded out" eating a rose made a week ahead of time ... how old ARE those Oreos in your pantry? icon_confused.gificon_lol.gif

loves2bake Posted 4 Sep 2008 , 1:36pm
post #12 of 58
Quote:
Originally Posted by littlecake

well it will be a great experiance doing that many, it will hone your skills.

i've done so many ...i think i can do one in about 30 seconds....listen, they really go so much faster...and nicer..IMHO...if you can master the stick method...you can flat whoop em out then....

there's a video on you tube...she's making purple roses....it really shows how fast you can do them (on the stick)...you'll love it after you master it.




Ur not kiddin' about it honing my skills..lol (if I dont have it down pat by the end of this, I'm throwin in my piping bag! icon_lol.gif )

I've heard of the stick method, but have never tried it, do you have he link to that video? Do you keep the finishes rose on the stick when applying to the cake or take it off? If you leave them on the stick, where do you store the stick roses?(May sound dumb but I'm not taking any chances..lol)

loves2bake Posted 4 Sep 2008 , 1:45pm
post #13 of 58
Quote:
Originally Posted by CuteCakeName

There is no reason to not serve royal icing roses with the cake. My husband and daughter love to eat those things! They are 100% edible, and I would definitely use RI so that you can make them way in advance and not have to stress when the cake is due. Be sure to make quite a few extras in case of breakage.




When you make your royal, do you flavor it? I think these are going to be eaten (at least I would hope so) and I'd like for them to taste decent icon_wink.gif

littlecake Posted 4 Sep 2008 , 1:47pm
post #14 of 58




i'm with indy on the buttercream too

it's remarkable how fast you can do them if you throw away the flower nail....

when i took my first wilton course...it took forever just to do one rose on that dang thing.

when i went to work at the first bakery, they were just whoopin them out like crazy, i thought i'll never be able to do that....ha ha....but now i can

tonedna Posted 4 Sep 2008 , 2:19pm
post #15 of 58

Both of them can be made fast. The question is, does she wants to make them ahead and save some time the day she does the cake or not.
I like both buttercream or RI roses. But if I do buttercream, I like it fresh. I guess is a matter of taste. And the other thing is the design on the cake..Wich is my question in all this thread.
The placement of the Roses make a difference on the materials you use..Do you have the cake photo so we can see it?
Edna

loves2bake Posted 4 Sep 2008 , 2:20pm
post #16 of 58
Quote:
Originally Posted by littlecake




i'm with indy on the buttercream too

it's remarkable how fast you can do them if you throw away the flower nail....

when i took my first wilton course...it took forever just to do one rose on that dang thing.

when i went to work at the first bakery, they were just whoopin them out like crazy, i thought i'll never be able to do that....ha ha....but now i can




I'm watching that video now. She is just ripping through them!! And to think that I was about to invest in a lg flower nail! Thanks for the suggestion. But, How large can you make the flowers?

flamingobaker Posted 4 Sep 2008 , 2:34pm
post #17 of 58

My MIL taught me to make BC roses and them freeze them. She still makes roses for a few people in her area and they last a very long time.
Freeze them on a cookie sheet, then to store them, put them in tupperware with waxed paper in between each layer. But be gentle.

millermom Posted 4 Sep 2008 , 2:43pm
post #18 of 58
Quote:
Originally Posted by loves2bake

Thanks for the suggestion. But, How large can you make the flowers?




I made some this summer on one of those cookie/lollipop sticks from Michael's. They were about 3" across when I was done. I used the large petal tip; #127. They were buttercream, but I prefer RI when I can. I just have more success with frosting consistency with RI.

My other suggestion is; if the bride wants ivory, do you want the roses the exact same color? I was wondering if they would look better in a slightly darker hue like beige or light tan? icon_confused.gif Just a thought.

loves2bake Posted 4 Sep 2008 , 2:45pm
post #19 of 58
Quote:
Originally Posted by tonedna

Both of them can be made fast. The question is, does she wants to make them ahead and save some time the day she does the cake or not.
I like both buttercream or RI roses. But if I do buttercream, I like it fresh. I guess is a matter of taste. And the other thing is the design on the cake..Wich is my question in all this thread.
The placement of the Roses make a difference on the materials you use..Do you have the cake photo so we can see it?
Edna



I do have a photo, but my scanner is down, but basically, the roses are the focal point of the whole cake. They start on the top tier in place of the Bride/Groom and flow all the way down/around the sides of the cake and ending at the bottom front. It's all to be done in ivory so color is important to me. Also, do I attach the roses w/RI the day of /onsite? or do I place them the day before and drive the cake CAREfully to the reception site>?

tonedna Posted 4 Sep 2008 , 2:58pm
post #20 of 58

Well..I dont know about the other girls...but I dont do buttercream roses that are going to go on the sides of the cakes.. Im in Florida, humidity can cause those to slide from the sides. So for side roses I usually stick to RI..
Edna

gr8_seamstress Posted 4 Sep 2008 , 2:59pm
post #21 of 58

The trick will be to keep the buttercream roses on the side of the cake. If you make RI roses you can attach them to the sides.....buttercream....difficult

loves2bake Posted 4 Sep 2008 , 3:00pm
post #22 of 58
Quote:
Originally Posted by lukasross

My MIL taught me to make BC roses and them freeze them. She still makes roses for a few people in her area and they last a very long time.
Freeze them on a cookie sheet, then to store them, put them in tupperware with waxed paper in between each layer. But be gentle.



I like the BC rose flavor and do want to go ahead and get strted making them to save myself from pulling my hair out the day of the cake baking.
I have never frozen BC roses, how do they thaw? Do you mean they last a long time when they are frozen? or even when they're not?

loves2bake Posted 4 Sep 2008 , 4:01pm
post #23 of 58
Quote:
Originally Posted by tonedna

Well..I dont know about the other girls...but I dont do buttercream roses that are going to go on the sides of the cakes.. Im in Florida, humidity can cause those to slide from the sides. So for side roses I usually stick to RI..
Edna



Ok, that decides it: RI roses for this cake; there are so many more advantages thumbs_up.gif
Now, what about flavor? Is RI flavored the same way as BC? (I could eat a whole bowl of BC by myself icon_lol.gif so I want it to be good)

tonedna Posted 4 Sep 2008 , 4:12pm
post #24 of 58

Some people love it, some people dont. My son and husband loves it. But I guess that's very particular to a person tastes buds. At the end of the day, If i have to decide between taste and the cake looking good, I will go for the look. At least the cake still has buttercream so you wont loose flavor.
Edna

all4cake Posted 4 Sep 2008 , 4:47pm
post #25 of 58

I don't flavor my r/i. I haven't had anyone tell me they don't like them..."they're just like candy!" is the usual response. It tastes just like those little candies that are carded in the cake decorating section H-A-P-P-Y B-I-R-T-H-D-A-Y or those litte icing characters that are carded...just sweet crunchy candy.

The only reason I don't make b/c roses ahead of time is because I heavy handed and have hot hands and r/i allows me to position them without worry that I'll crush 'em or make 'em turn into mush...I'm Mrs. Heat Mizer.

loves2bake Posted 4 Sep 2008 , 5:50pm
post #26 of 58

What if I replaced a little water with some vanilla, would that work?

Also, as this is my 1st time attaching this many (RI) flowers; For those of you that have experience with flower, how do you recommend to do this - RI attached to BC for side flowers??

tonedna Posted 4 Sep 2008 , 6:06pm
post #27 of 58

You can use buttercream to attach them..they stay but they need to be dry. The oils extracts wont work as RI doesnt like grease before is dried
Edna

all4cake Posted 4 Sep 2008 , 6:06pm
post #28 of 58

I attach r/i to b/c with b/c

loves2bake Posted 4 Sep 2008 , 6:29pm
post #29 of 58
Quote:
Originally Posted by millermom

Quote:
Originally Posted by loves2bake

Thanks for the suggestion. But, How large can you make the flowers?



My other suggestion is; if the bride wants ivory, do you want the roses the exact same color? I was wondering if they would look better in a slightly darker hue like beige or light tan? icon_confused.gif Just a thought.




I haven't exactly made up my mind. The bride has given me a pretty free reign, the only thing she was specific about was that they should be all ivory. I have seen this many times in all-white(fabulous), but I've not seen it in ivory. So' I'm open to suggetions and opinions icon_biggrin.gif

Also, any takers on getting them to stick to the sides??

millermom Posted 4 Sep 2008 , 6:42pm
post #30 of 58

I can't profess to be an expert on this. I have done cascades of smaller flowers using only BC to hold them, but never roses. I do agree that you should use BC to attach. RI will not harden if it comes in contact with BC or any grease before it is set. I don't think it will hold the flowers.

I will tell you one quick story, though, and tonedna eluded to it...

My mom did cake decorating too. She loves to tell about her biggest disaster being her first wedding cake (and her sister's too, thank goodness!). It was all white with peach roses cascading down like you are describing, and she had to deliver them in August in Virginia (high heat/humidity=disaster!)

Anyway, their car at the time did not have AC, and the roses started sliding. Fortunately, she had plenty of toothpicks, and she used most of them! From then on, she and I both carry a "first aid kit" with us whenever we deliver a cake! icon_lol.gif

Not to scare you, just to prepare you! Good luck!
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