Making Buttercream Roses Tutorial

Decorating By blueberrycheesecake Updated 21 Mar 2009 , 10:06pm by blueberrycheesecake

blueberrycheesecake Posted 31 Aug 2008 , 11:48pm
post #1 of 21

hi! I am back with a question icon_biggrin.gif and everyone was really helpful from my previous posts . Thanks a lot!

Anyway, I have seen this tutorial about buttercream roses -- http://www.cakecentral.com/article50-Making-Buttercream-Rose. I tried making buttercream icing before and tried it again and really wasn't happy and impressed with the results.

You see, after I make one, the buttercream icing turns out to be a watery mess. I mean really watery. It's not stiff or crusty so I could make flowers or make decorations out of it. Everyone here have used buttercream for their decorations on cakes and I am really jealous of it icon_cry.gif

please help! if you have a recipe to share (something that has really worked with great results!), i hope you can share it with me. icon_cry.gificon_redface.gificon_sad.gif

20 replies
kakeladi Posted 1 Sep 2008 , 1:01am
post #2 of 21

Please post your recipe.
It sounds like 1) you have very hot hands and 2) your consistency is all wrong.
Knowing what you are working with will help us help you.

crisseyann Posted 1 Sep 2008 , 1:09am
post #3 of 21

I will be watching this thread. I specifically took the Wilton classes to learn how to make the rose. I had SO much difficulty and have practiced SO many times but I still cannot make a buttercream rose to save my life! Please help us!

Edited to add...I have used the class buttercream, stiff, as they told us. I have also added corn syrup, to make it softer. I have ALSO used my favorite buttercream (which is part butter, part shortening)

kakeladi Posted 1 Sep 2008 , 2:37am
post #4 of 21

crisseyann what is you major problem? What goes wrong? I'll try to help.
Are you right or left handed?
Wilton's class icing is a good one to make rosesicon_smile.gif

TexasSugar Posted 1 Sep 2008 , 3:22am
post #5 of 21

I totally agree with Kakeladi, blueberrycheesecake, post your recipe. You may be able to make some adjustments to it rather than having to try a new one.

Crisseyann, can you share a picture of your roses or describe where you are having problems. It can be a number of things.

I always use Wilton Stiff recipe for my roses. I have learned sometimes it needs a little more fat to make it creamier. You can also use a little piping gel. What I love about both is that they make the icing creamier and a little stickier with out thinning it down.

blueberrycheesecake Posted 1 Sep 2008 , 10:19am
post #6 of 21
Quote:
Originally Posted by kakeladi

Please post your recipe.
It sounds like 1) you have very hot hands and 2) your consistency is all wrong.
Knowing what you are working with will help us help you.




Hi! icon_smile.gif Sorry about that... I took this from the internet and I forgot where I got it. icon_biggrin.gif Here's the recipe I followed.. It was actually okay at first because it looked like royal icing, but after i put the butter in, it was all watery.

ITALIAN MERINGUE BUTTERCREAM


* 5 eggs (large)
* 10 ounces (1 1/4 cups) extra-fine granulated sugar, divided
* 1/4 cup water
* 1 pound (4 sticks) unsalted butter, soft

Set out the ingredients and equipment.

Separate the eggs and place the whites in the bowl of the standing mixer fitted with a wire whip attachment. Reserve the yolks for another use.

Measure 1 cup of the sugar into a heavy-bottomed 1-quart saucepan with 1/4 cup water. Gently stir to combine; I use the candy thermometer for this. Leave the candy thermometer in the saucepan, numbers facing down to balance the thermometer.

Measure the 1/4 cup sugar into a small bowl and set aside.

Cut the butter into tablespoon-size pieces and set aside in a medium bowl.

Begin making the sugar syrup. Place the saucepan with the sugar and water over medium-high heat. Partially cover with a lid to capture the evaporating water -- this helps to moisten the sides of the saucepan to prevent sugar crystals separating from the syrup.

Begin whipping the egg whites to stiff peak in a standing mixer fitted with the wire whip attachment set to high speed. When the whites are at stiff peak you have a meringue. Keep the mixer running and pour the 1/4 cup of sugar into the meringue.

Raise the heat to bring the syrup to 245 degrees if it is not there already. When the syrup is at 245 degrees, remove the thermometer and slowly pour the syrup into the meringue.

When pouring, keep your eye on the bowl. Aim for the space between the mixer bowl and the revolving wire whip. To maintain the same rate of pouring, pour slowly and raise the saucepan from your shoulder. Twisting at the wrist or elbow tends to throw off my aim.

After 1 to 2 minutes reduce the speed to medium for about 3 to 4 minutes or until the meringue is cooled.

Add the butter one tablespoon at a time. Increase the speed to high for one to two minutes to fully combine the butter with the meringue.

blueberrycheesecake Posted 1 Sep 2008 , 10:21am
post #7 of 21
Quote:
Originally Posted by crisseyann

I will be watching this thread. I specifically took the Wilton classes to learn how to make the rose. I had SO much difficulty and have practiced SO many times but I still cannot make a buttercream rose to save my life! Please help us!

Edited to add...I have used the class buttercream, stiff, as they told us. I have also added corn syrup, to make it softer. I have ALSO used my favorite buttercream (which is part butter, part shortening)




i haven't taken wilton classes but i watch some youtube videos on how to make buttercream roses. it was really hard. my rose didn't look like roses! icon_lol.gif i'm not sure what i made. icon_redface.gif

blueberrycheesecake Posted 1 Sep 2008 , 10:23am
post #8 of 21
Quote:
Originally Posted by TexasSugar

I totally agree with Kakeladi, blueberrycheesecake, post your recipe. You may be able to make some adjustments to it rather than having to try a new one.

Crisseyann, can you share a picture of your roses or describe where you are having problems. It can be a number of things.

I always use Wilton Stiff recipe for my roses. I have learned sometimes it needs a little more fat to make it creamier. You can also use a little piping gel. What I love about both is that they make the icing creamier and a little stickier with out thinning it down.




Hi! i posted my recipe! hope you can check it out. i replied to Kakeladi for the recipe. it's on the forum. thanks! God bless! icon_smile.gif

iownajane Posted 1 Sep 2008 , 10:51am
post #9 of 21
Quote:
Originally Posted by blueberrycheesecake

Quote:
Originally Posted by kakeladi

Please post your recipe.
It sounds like 1) you have very hot hands and 2) your consistency is all wrong.
Knowing what you are working with will help us help you.



Hi! icon_smile.gif Sorry about that... I took this from the internet and I forgot where I got it. icon_biggrin.gif Here's the recipe I followed.. It was actually okay at first because it looked like royal icing, but after i put the butter in, it was all watery.

ITALIAN MERINGUE BUTTERCREAM


* 5 eggs (large)
* 10 ounces (1 1/4 cups) extra-fine granulated sugar, divided
* 1/4 cup water
* 1 pound (4 sticks) unsalted butter, soft

Set out the ingredients and equipment.

Separate the eggs and place the whites in the bowl of the standing mixer fitted with a wire whip attachment. Reserve the yolks for another use.

Measure 1 cup of the sugar into a heavy-bottomed 1-quart saucepan with 1/4 cup water. Gently stir to combine; I use the candy thermometer for this. Leave the candy thermometer in the saucepan, numbers facing down to balance the thermometer.

Measure the 1/4 cup sugar into a small bowl and set aside.

Cut the butter into tablespoon-size pieces and set aside in a medium bowl.

Begin making the sugar syrup. Place the saucepan with the sugar and water over medium-high heat. Partially cover with a lid to capture the evaporating water -- this helps to moisten the sides of the saucepan to prevent sugar crystals separating from the syrup.

Begin whipping the egg whites to stiff peak in a standing mixer fitted with the wire whip attachment set to high speed. When the whites are at stiff peak you have a meringue. Keep the mixer running and pour the 1/4 cup of sugar into the meringue.

Raise the heat to bring the syrup to 245 degrees if it is not there already. When the syrup is at 245 degrees, remove the thermometer and slowly pour the syrup into the meringue.

When pouring, keep your eye on the bowl. Aim for the space between the mixer bowl and the revolving wire whip. To maintain the same rate of pouring, pour slowly and raise the saucepan from your shoulder. Twisting at the wrist or elbow tends to throw off my aim.

After 1 to 2 minutes reduce the speed to medium for about 3 to 4 minutes or until the meringue is cooled.

Add the butter one tablespoon at a time. Increase the speed to high for one to two minutes to fully combine the butter with the meringue.




Maybe you're not whipping/beating enough...I have a similar recipe...I add the syrup and bet on med high till my bowl is barely warm to the touch and no visible steam...then I add butter a tsp at atime...and then let it beat and bet til it gets through the curdling yucky stage to smooth,and then a couple of minutes on high...maybe you stopped beating too soon? Anyone?

kakeladi Posted 1 Sep 2008 , 6:31pm
post #10 of 21

No wonder you are having troubleicon_smile.gif I don't think anyone could use that recipe to make rosesicon_sad.gif
You need one that uses Crisco and powdered sugar.
Here's one that will work:

1/2 cup solid vegetable shortening
1/2 cup Butter softened
1 teaspoon Clear Vanilla Extract
4 cups Confectioners' sugar sifted
2 tablespoons water
2 tablespoons Cornstarch
instructions
In large bowl, beat shortening and butter with electric mixer until light and fluffy.
Add vanilla; mix well. Gradually add sugar, one cup at a time, beating well on medium speed.
Scrape sides and bottom of bowl often. When all sugar mixture has been mixed in, icing will appear dry.
In small bowl, combine milk and cornstarch; stir until cornstarch is dissolved. Add to icing mixture; beat at medium speed until light and fluffy.
For best results, keep icing bowl in refrigerator when not in use, covered w/plastic wrap.
Refrigerated in an airtight container, this icing can be stored 2 weeks. Re-whip before using

I don't use the cornstarch. Vary the amount of liquid *slightly* until it is right for you.

MBHazel Posted 1 Sep 2008 , 10:41pm
post #11 of 21

My roses aren't all that great either, I am left-handed... does that matter?

Hazel

kakeladi Posted 2 Sep 2008 , 12:41am
post #12 of 21

Being lefthanded does pose a bit of a problem. I was told I would never be able to make many b'cream flowers icon_sad.gif You might be trying to make them backwards.
Several points that are important.
The back of your bag needs to point over your shoulder and your forearm must be glued to your 'boob' icon_smile.gif All movement is from the fingers to the elbow.
Your mound should be the same size & shape as a Hersey's Kiss. Yes, some people actually use a HK but I don't....
The bottom of the tip needs to always touch the mound; never point at the mound but keep it along side it. (Let's see what graphic I can come up with to show the differece. Mound: "^" Tip: "I" So you want this: "^I" Not this: "^ <--" . Does that help?)
For the 1st 3 petals the tip is straight up & down (the top is at 12 oclock). You work from the back to front making an upside down "U"; turn the nail 1/3; repeat making upsidedown U; turn nail 1/3 & repeat.
For the next row, the top of the tip moves out to 1 oclock but the bottom remains touching the mound. Pipe out 5 petals like the 1st 3. These are short - about 1/4 to 12" long.
Next row turn the top of the tip to 3 oclock; everything else remains the same. Pipe out 7 petals while turning the nail at the same time as you are piping the petal about 3/4" long. All of these petals are formed by piping the upside down U from the back of the mound to the front.
Remember thru all of this the back of the bag points over your shoulder and your forearm is glued to your side.

Even though I am very lefthanded I have taught myslef how to make roese righthanded which I needed to know what I taught Wilton.

MBHazel Posted 2 Sep 2008 , 12:48am
post #13 of 21

Thanks a million for the information. I had always thought the left-handed thing was a problem. I had to really work at ruffles , so they wouldn't be facing into the cake!

Hazel

blueberrycheesecake Posted 2 Sep 2008 , 10:25pm
post #14 of 21
Quote:
Originally Posted by kakeladi

No wonder you are having troubleicon_smile.gif I don't think anyone could use that recipe to make rosesicon_sad.gif
You need one that uses Crisco and powdered sugar.
Here's one that will work:

1/2 cup solid vegetable shortening
1/2 cup Butter softened
1 teaspoon Clear Vanilla Extract
4 cups Confectioners' sugar sifted
2 tablespoons water
2 tablespoons Cornstarch
instructions
In large bowl, beat shortening and butter with electric mixer until light and fluffy.
Add vanilla; mix well. Gradually add sugar, one cup at a time, beating well on medium speed.
Scrape sides and bottom of bowl often. When all sugar mixture has been mixed in, icing will appear dry.
In small bowl, combine milk and cornstarch; stir until cornstarch is dissolved. Add to icing mixture; beat at medium speed until light and fluffy.
For best results, keep icing bowl in refrigerator when not in use, covered w/plastic wrap.
Refrigerated in an airtight container, this icing can be stored 2 weeks. Re-whip before using

I don't use the cornstarch. Vary the amount of liquid *slightly* until it is right for you.




thanks so much kakeladi! and thank you for the recipe! i will make one up and try making buttercream roses again. icon_smile.gif God bless you for your kindness!

sugarlove Posted 3 Sep 2008 , 2:37pm
post #15 of 21
Quote:
Originally Posted by kakeladi

No wonder you are having troubleicon_smile.gif I don't think anyone could use that recipe to make rosesicon_sad.gif
You need one that uses Crisco and powdered sugar.
Here's one that will work:

1/2 cup solid vegetable shortening
1/2 cup Butter softened
1 teaspoon Clear Vanilla Extract
4 cups Confectioners' sugar sifted
2 tablespoons water
2 tablespoons Cornstarch
instructions
In large bowl, beat shortening and butter with electric mixer until light and fluffy.
Add vanilla; mix well. Gradually add sugar, one cup at a time, beating well on medium speed.
Scrape sides and bottom of bowl often. When all sugar mixture has been mixed in, icing will appear dry.
In small bowl, combine milk and cornstarch; stir until cornstarch is dissolved. Add to icing mixture; beat at medium speed until light and fluffy.
For best results, keep icing bowl in refrigerator when not in use, covered w/plastic wrap.
Refrigerated in an airtight container, this icing can be stored 2 weeks. Re-whip before using

I don't use the cornstarch. Vary the amount of liquid *slightly* until it is right for you.




So, not true. You can make beautiful roses with IMBC. The buttercream turns soupy because the butter is too warm and the add to warm meringue. Beat the meringue until it is cool...I normally beat for about 30 minutes and then add the cooled butter. If your room is warm use chilled butter from the fridge. The main thing is to beat the meringue until the bowl is no longer warm to touch and the butter is firm to touch not soft.

blueberrycheesecake Posted 4 Sep 2008 , 1:05am
post #16 of 21
Quote:
Originally Posted by sugarlove

Quote:
Originally Posted by kakeladi

No wonder you are having troubleicon_smile.gif I don't think anyone could use that recipe to make rosesicon_sad.gif
You need one that uses Crisco and powdered sugar.
Here's one that will work:

1/2 cup solid vegetable shortening
1/2 cup Butter softened
1 teaspoon Clear Vanilla Extract
4 cups Confectioners' sugar sifted
2 tablespoons water
2 tablespoons Cornstarch
instructions
In large bowl, beat shortening and butter with electric mixer until light and fluffy.
Add vanilla; mix well. Gradually add sugar, one cup at a time, beating well on medium speed.
Scrape sides and bottom of bowl often. When all sugar mixture has been mixed in, icing will appear dry.
In small bowl, combine milk and cornstarch; stir until cornstarch is dissolved. Add to icing mixture; beat at medium speed until light and fluffy.
For best results, keep icing bowl in refrigerator when not in use, covered w/plastic wrap.
Refrigerated in an airtight container, this icing can be stored 2 weeks. Re-whip before using

I don't use the cornstarch. Vary the amount of liquid *slightly* until it is right for you.



So, not true. You can make beautiful roses with IMBC. The buttercream turns soupy because the butter is too warm and the add to warm meringue. Beat the meringue until it is cool...I normally beat for about 30 minutes and then add the cooled butter. If your room is warm use chilled butter from the fridge. The main thing is to beat the meringue until the bowl is no longer warm to touch and the butter is firm to touch not soft.




hmm.. this is something i need to try, too! thank you, sugarlove! now my problem is how to make roses hr=ehe!

imagine76 Posted 4 Sep 2008 , 1:39am
post #17 of 21

i took the wilton I class about 8 years ago. it seemed like i got pretty good at the roses then but now i stink at it. i like my icing thinner for everything else but flowers but can't seem to re-train myself to make it stiff. i know i just need to practice making a billion roses until i get good at it but mostly it just makes me say naughty words. can i just come over to someone's place so i can relearn?! icon_cry.gificon_lol.gif

BCJean Posted 4 Sep 2008 , 1:58am
post #18 of 21
Quote:
Originally Posted by imagine76

i took the wilton I class about 8 years ago. it seemed like i got pretty good at the roses then but now i stink at it. i like my icing thinner for everything else but flowers but can't seem to re-train myself to make it stiff. i know i just need to practice making a billion roses until i get good at it but mostly it just makes me say naughty words. can i just come over to someone's place so i can relearn?! icon_cry.gificon_lol.gif





I use the very same icing for icing my cake and for making the roses. I also make roses using Bettercreme. I find it works awesome if your icing is not more than 75°F. If it is too warm I put it in the fridge for a few minutes to cool it down. I almost always do that with my red roses because all of the color added to it seems to break the icing down. Of course, I also think everyone should be making their roses on a stick, so much easier.

You are welcome to stop by here any time (thru the week, not weekends). I don't know how close you are to central California.

imagine76 Posted 4 Sep 2008 , 2:10am
post #19 of 21

uuummmmmm.... nebraska. ok, BCJean, maybe i'll just practice a lot!

icer101 Posted 4 Sep 2008 , 2:11am
post #20 of 21

i too can make roses using the imbc... or the bettercream.... once you learn with the regular buttercream , using crisco and 10x sugar... then you can go with the others... but to learn... l think you need at least the wilton recipe. the wbh imbc recipe makes good roses and other flowers

blueberrycheesecake Posted 21 Mar 2009 , 10:06pm
post #21 of 21
Quote:
Originally Posted by sugarlove

Quote:
Originally Posted by kakeladi

No wonder you are having troubleicon_smile.gif I don't think anyone could use that recipe to make rosesicon_sad.gif
You need one that uses Crisco and powdered sugar.
Here's one that will work:

1/2 cup solid vegetable shortening
1/2 cup Butter softened
1 teaspoon Clear Vanilla Extract
4 cups Confectioners' sugar sifted
2 tablespoons water
2 tablespoons Cornstarch
instructions
In large bowl, beat shortening and butter with electric mixer until light and fluffy.
Add vanilla; mix well. Gradually add sugar, one cup at a time, beating well on medium speed.
Scrape sides and bottom of bowl often. When all sugar mixture has been mixed in, icing will appear dry.
In small bowl, combine milk and cornstarch; stir until cornstarch is dissolved. Add to icing mixture; beat at medium speed until light and fluffy.
For best results, keep icing bowl in refrigerator when not in use, covered w/plastic wrap.
Refrigerated in an airtight container, this icing can be stored 2 weeks. Re-whip before using

I don't use the cornstarch. Vary the amount of liquid *slightly* until it is right for you.



So, not true. You can make beautiful roses with IMBC. The buttercream turns soupy because the butter is too warm and the add to warm meringue. Beat the meringue until it is cool...I normally beat for about 30 minutes and then add the cooled butter. If your room is warm use chilled butter from the fridge. The main thing is to beat the meringue until the bowl is no longer warm to touch and the butter is firm to touch not soft.




hi! thanks! i found out about it too late, though. But that's how I realized it wasn't turning ok because I put everything right away while it was warm. icon_smile.gif

But kakeldi's was an alternative that I used, too.

Thanks to both! icon_smile.gif

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