Please Help My Cake Won't Rise........

Baking By Iva1976 Updated 30 Aug 2008 , 9:10pm by Iva1976

Iva1976 Posted 29 Aug 2008 , 3:05pm
post #1 of 6

I am new to baking/decorating, I am still currently taking classes. I have baked 3 cakes so far, and they did not rise. They are sort of compacted and the texture is terrible. icon_cry.gif I don't know what I'm doing wrong....Can it be the way I'm mixing the batter, or can it be my oven? I have an oven themometer but I have noticed that the oven goes on and off. Can that be the problem? Any help or suggestions are greatly appreciated!! icon_lol.gif

5 replies
kelleym Posted 29 Aug 2008 , 5:42pm
post #2 of 6

If you could post the recipe you are using, someone might be able to help you. Home ovens do cycle off and on to maintain their temperature, so that's probably not the problem.

Rocketgirl899 Posted 29 Aug 2008 , 5:47pm
post #3 of 6

How full do you fill the pans? If you take Wilton's advice they say fill half way. I always fill about 1-3 full that will help.

Also if you use a box mix, they say it fills 2 8in or 2 9 in pans.... I don't know what planet they are on. I find 2 boxes of Betty Crocker fills 2 6 in pans and 2 8in pans, with enough for 2 cupcakes (yum) left over.

JanH Posted 30 Aug 2008 , 3:02am
post #4 of 6

Hi and Welcome to CC, iva1976. icon_smile.gif

Decoding CC acronyms:

http://forum.cakecentral.com/cake-decorating-ftopict-2926-.html

Quote:
Originally Posted by iva1976

They are sort of compacted and the texture is terrible. icon_cry.gif I don't know what I'm doing wrong....Can it be the way I'm mixing the batter, or can it be my oven?




Yes, overmixing develops the gluten and you wind up with rubbery hockey pucks. icon_lol.gif

When mixing, use the lowest speed on a stand mixer, or medium sped on a hand held mixer.

Sift your dry ingredients to remove any lumps prior to mixing. (Trying to "beat" the lumps out can easily cause overmixing.)

Also, don't mix longer than recommended.

Handy cake troubleshooting charts:

http://tinyurl.com/2p5bdu

http://tinyurl.com/32goqe

http://tinyurl.com/6c745g

EVERYTHING you ever wanted to know about making your 1st tiered cake:

http://forum.cakecentral.com/cake-decorating-ftopicP-5958955-.html

Links to Wilton's updated cake making & decorating help:

http://www.wilton.com/cakes/making-cakes/

http://www.wilton.com/cakes/

Illustrated guide to cutting neat slices of tiered cake by indydebi:

http://cateritsimple.com/_wsn/page10.html

HTH

kakeladi Posted 30 Aug 2008 , 3:18am
post #5 of 6

Iva,you really haven't given us enough information to come up w/a definitive answer for you.
Are you baking from scratch or using a box mix?
As someone else said, post your recipe with the method used to mix it.
An oven maintains temp by going about 25-50 degrees higher than the requested temp. then letting the temp fall about 20-50 below that #. This is the normal rythem of any ovenicon_smile.gif
All pan should be filled w/batter no less than 1/2 the way up the side but better yet, 2/3rds.
A 10"x2 round, or 12x8x2 sheet; OR an 8" sq each take the batter from one cake mix just to give yu an example.

Iva1976 Posted 30 Aug 2008 , 9:10pm
post #6 of 6

Sorry all for not providing enough info. I have made a chocolate, vanilla and dominican cake from scratch. They all turned out the same icon_cry.gif
I have no problem when I bake boxed cakes, they rise and are moist. Because boxed cakes are a much lighter batter than a cake made from scratch, I thought the problem was my oven......I guess that's not the problem, maybe I'm over mixing the batter. Thanks JanH, I'm going to check out those links.......I am clueless when it comes to baking icon_sad.gif
Thanks for the help, I really need it!!!

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