Dream Whip

Decorating By hopesmith Updated 30 Aug 2008 , 5:32pm by FlourPots

hopesmith Posted 28 Aug 2008 , 6:47pm
post #1 of 20

What is the purpose of Dream Whip in some buttercream recipes? I was making Indydebi's and couldn't find my recipe so I made it from memory, which isn't that great to start with) and forgot the dream whip. Still tasted fantastic and since I was only using it to put a thin layer on some petit fours I wasn't to concerned. But I'm wondering if it would hold up making decorations and such.

Thanks

19 replies
Texas_Rose Posted 28 Aug 2008 , 6:58pm
post #2 of 20

That's a good question...I was going to try making it without the dream whip just to see what would happen, or try using instant pudding mix instead of the dream whip (to save $$$), but my husband said, "That's the best icing ever, don't you dare change a thing about it!!!" icon_lol.gificon_lol.gificon_biggrin.gificon_lol.gificon_lol.gif so I never got around to trying it.

I did make it today with lemon extract added instead of most of the vanilla, and it was great.

ceshell Posted 29 Aug 2008 , 7:16am
post #3 of 20

Hopefully debi will answer (or you can pm her w/a link to this thread) but my guess is: flavor and stability. Dream Whip has transfats I believe, so those help replace the missing tf's in your new 0tf Crisco.

indydebi Posted 29 Aug 2008 , 11:40am
post #4 of 20

I just found this thread.

I've no idea why it works. It's the only icing recipe I've used for 25 years. People tell me it tastes like whipped cream icing, but different. They tell me it's not as sweet (whatever that means!).

I've no idea. I just know it works. thumbs_up.gif

Melvira Posted 29 Aug 2008 , 11:50am
post #5 of 20

Like Debi, my mother has been making her buttercream with Dream Whip since I was a tot, and it was the first version I ever made. I think the whole purpose of the dream whip is about creaminess and fluffiness. It's not that it won't work without it, just that it adds a little extra to it! A nice creamy texture and flavor. My mom swears by it. I don't use it for business purposes just because it can get wicked expensive quickly, but occaisonally for personal reasons I do pull out that recipe and dust it off!

mandi1613 Posted 29 Aug 2008 , 12:02pm
post #6 of 20

Can you post the recipe using the dream whip or do you just add some to your regular buttercream icing? thanks

indydebi Posted 29 Aug 2008 , 12:37pm
post #8 of 20
Quote:
Originally Posted by Melvira

I don't use it for business purposes just because it can get wicked expensive quickly, but occaisonally for personal reasons I do pull out that recipe and dust it off!




I just started also adding it to my cake batter also, so it's really common for me to go thru 8-10 or more envelopes in one baking session. That the only adds $6-$9 to the cost of the cake, though, so on a $450 cake, that's not too bad.

mandi1613 Posted 29 Aug 2008 , 12:40pm
post #9 of 20

Thanks

imakecakes Posted 29 Aug 2008 , 12:44pm
post #10 of 20

Does anyone know if this can be frozen and/or how long it will keep if refrigerated?

indydebi Posted 29 Aug 2008 , 12:52pm
post #11 of 20
Quote:
Originally Posted by imakecakes

Does anyone know if this can be frozen and/or how long it will keep if refrigerated?




I've never frozen it, but I keep it in a container on my shelves for weeks. One of my girls put some in the 'frig once and it was in there for-practically-ever. Still good.

imakecakes Posted 29 Aug 2008 , 1:04pm
post #12 of 20

Thank you indydebi!! Most helpful, as always!

vrmcc1 Posted 29 Aug 2008 , 1:36pm
post #13 of 20

I use a recipe similar to indydebi's. I think that the dream whip adds stability to the icing it withstand the heat and humidity extreamly well. I freeze my leftover icing with no problems just give it a little stir when it is thawed. You can also buy the off brand of powdered whipped topping mix at the store or in 1 lb bags from a local resturant supplier (my supplier charges 4.50 a bag)

Melvira Posted 29 Aug 2008 , 4:14pm
post #14 of 20
Quote:
Originally Posted by indydebi

That the only adds $6-$9 to the cost of the cake, though, so on a $450 cake, that's not too bad.




Yah, that seems more than reasonable... but around here I'm lucky to get a $45 cake order! Hahaha!! It's not that bad, but it's small town here, so people want it as cheap as they can get it. I like to point them to WalMart in those situations!

FlourPots Posted 29 Aug 2008 , 8:43pm
post #15 of 20

indydebi...I just made your icing (it's a practice batch) and had to stop at 6 cups of powdered sugar because it tasted sweet enough, and I knew 8 would've been too much...only now has it occurred to me that maybe it's the store brand of sugar I'm using...I say that b/c of my fondant post yesterday, I had the same issue and I used the same brand for that.

Could you tell me what brand you use?

indydebi Posted 29 Aug 2008 , 8:51pm
post #16 of 20

I use whatever brand is on the store shelf ... Sam's, I use Baker's Chef brand (or is it Bakers' Choice?); walmart brand, Dominoes brand, Kroger brand ... I'm not brand loyal.

I've never understood the "it's too sweet" thing. Adding more sugar to sugar doesn't make the sugar more sweet. It just makes it thicker. I can understand adding sugar to tea will make the tea more sweet .... but when you're adding sugar to sugar? icon_confused.gif What ratio are you changing?

If I need thinner icing, I reduce the sugar .... if I need stiffer icing, I add more sugar. It never affects the taste as far as I can tell.

FlourPots Posted 29 Aug 2008 , 9:10pm
post #17 of 20

Really??? I'm way off then...I thought I was adding sugar to the base ingredient (shortening) and sweetening that.

I started taste testing at 4 cups and when I got to 6, it was perfectly sweet...I was afraid 2 more would kill it, but maybe I should have kept going, especially since it probably won't crust correctly now.

Actually what I should have done was started experimenting sooner, not waited till 2 days before the event.

Thank you so much for your quick reply.

OhMyGanache Posted 30 Aug 2008 , 4:42pm
post #18 of 20

If your icing is too sweet, put a little salt into some liquid (vanilla, milk, water, etc.) and then mix it into your buttercream - this will cut the sweetness.

I have several customers who want my "less sweet" buttercream. They assume they are getting less sugar - and I don't have the heart to tell them that's not the way it works (none of them have asked me directly yet...)

ginnybug Posted 30 Aug 2008 , 4:59pm
post #19 of 20

Debi--
Does having milk in the icing not affect it sitting out on the shelf for weeks? My Wilton instructor told me to sub water for the milk so that it would not get rancid but if the milk in the icing keeps fine I'm sure that it would taste better. Sorry for my ignorance but I'm new to all this. Thanks for any suggestions on this matter

FlourPots Posted 30 Aug 2008 , 5:32pm
post #20 of 20

I have to say, my tweaked version of indydeb's recipe is insane...after it sat for a little while, I tasted it and was so happy...to me it tastes a little like vanilla ice cream...and everyone who has walked through my door today has been made to try it...huge raves all around. I can't stop sneaking tastes from the bowl.

My tweaks were: I added a scant 1/2 tsp salt and 1 extra tsp. of Dream Whip after the icing was completed, but still in the mixer...another quick whirl and it was done. I had also only used 6 cups of powdered sugar, as I stated above. Lastly, the recipe calls for 2-3 Tb. of vanilla...I used 2 Tb + 1/2 tsp. (it wasn't a high-end brand either, it was McCormick's pure vanilla from the supermarket).

Forgot to add: The amount of milk that worked for mine was 1/3 cup even.

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