Who Knows The Secret To A Borderless Fondant Cake?

Decorating By 2muchsugar Updated 12 Sep 2008 , 2:47pm by woodthi32

2muchsugar Posted 26 Aug 2008 , 5:13pm
post #1 of 28

Okay, I know how ambitious it is to even attempt a borderless fondant cake, but I have a design that requires it. Does anyone have the secret or at least an idea how people accomplish this? I can come pretty close, but it seems like no matter how careful I am, I can never reach Elisa Strauss' expertise!

Any thoughts would be appreciated!

27 replies
mariela_ms Posted 26 Aug 2008 , 5:39pm
post #2 of 28

I think it is done by covering with fondant all they way down covering the cake board and slightly tucking the fondant in under the cake board. I saw it on Ace of cakes...or somewhere...Hope that helps and good luck icon_smile.gif!

janelwaters Posted 26 Aug 2008 , 5:44pm
post #3 of 28

I also think that is how you do it. Put the cake on the cake board on place it on something smaller than the cake to elevate it (I've used and empty satin ice bucket - 5lb upside down) that way you can get under it.

If someone else has a better way I would L-O-V-E to hear it b/c the other way is difficult sometimes with the fondant pulling etc.

Texas_Rose Posted 26 Aug 2008 , 5:47pm
post #4 of 28

I think the trick to that is patience and good luck icon_biggrin.gif Actually, I've accomplished it a couple of times and what seems to work is having a cake board cut to the size of the cake, rolling the fondant a little thicker than usual, and planning to wrap the fondant around the underside of the cake board. I smooth it down as much as possible, trim it leaving about 1/2 inch or 1 inch, then use an angled spatula to lift the cake enough to get my fingers under it, hold it with one hand and then use the other hand to tuck the edge under the bottom of the cake board. Then I set it on a sheet of waxed paper until it's ready to be stacked. The waxed paper helps because you can lift the cake up a bit with it so you don't mess up the edges.

I managed it on the top tier of this cake: http://www.cakecentral.com/modules.php?name=gallery&file=displayimage&pid=1255946 but the bottom tier was a different story (I think it was possessed icon_lol.gificon_lol.gificon_lol.gif ) as you can see by the scattered beads around the bottom edge, covering some major flaws. I did learn from it though that it helps when the kitchen is not too hot. The cake I did the next weekend came out with perfect edges, which all got covered up because of the design of it...but I knew they were there.

I don't put it on something smaller than my cake board because I am not the most coordinated person and I'm likely to knock the whole thing over icon_biggrin.gif

Rhienn Posted 26 Aug 2008 , 5:54pm
post #5 of 28

It also helps to cut the edge of the fondant at an angle. So, you would hold your knife or pastry wheel at a 45 degree angle when cutting instead of straight up and down. Does that make sense? You get sort of a beveled edge that way. Although - if you were going to tuck the ends under the board, I guess it wouldn't matter.

azeboi2005 Posted 26 Aug 2008 , 5:59pm
post #6 of 28

couldn't you use royal icing colored the same as the fondant and use it as a "putty" of sorts to fill in the gap or cover what is exposed. pipe a stream and then smooth with your finger.

woodthi32 Posted 26 Aug 2008 , 6:10pm
post #7 of 28

get sugarshacks dvd.................in there is your solution.

Kitagrl Posted 26 Aug 2008 , 6:20pm
post #8 of 28

Too....in a pinch, you can make some royal icing the exact color of the fondant (of course white works best) and pipe a small bit around the bottom edge...then wipe firmly with your finger or a business card or something to smooth. I like to do that anyway on fondant stacked cakes even when I'm doing a border, but if you match the colors exactly it can help make the edges look right. I did it on a brown/pear wedding cake I did in my photos, although it was hard to match the chocolate color and you *can* see the sealed edges.

sadsmile Posted 26 Aug 2008 , 6:21pm
post #9 of 28
Quote:
Originally Posted by 2muchsugar

Okay, I know how ambitious it is to even attempt a borderless fondant cake, but I have a design that requires it. Does anyone have the secret or at least an idea how people accomplish this? I can come pretty close, but it seems like no matter how careful I am, I can never reach Elisa Strauss' expertise!

Any thoughts would be appreciated!


Um are you kidding me here??? Your gold and chocolate cake looks to be borderless and gorgeous!!! Just do that!

Kitagrl Posted 26 Aug 2008 , 6:24pm
post #10 of 28
Quote:
Originally Posted by sadsmile

Quote:
Originally Posted by 2muchsugar

Okay, I know how ambitious it is to even attempt a borderless fondant cake, but I have a design that requires it. Does anyone have the secret or at least an idea how people accomplish this? I can come pretty close, but it seems like no matter how careful I am, I can never reach Elisa Strauss' expertise!

Any thoughts would be appreciated!

Um are you kidding me here??? Your gold and chocolate cake looks to be borderless and gorgeous!!! Just do that!




Hmmm sure enough! What a perfect cake! Methinks you are too picky! haha.

Hey my parents live in Salt Lake.... anyway...gorgeous cakes!!!

woodthi32 Posted 26 Aug 2008 , 6:30pm
post #11 of 28

OK, just looked at your cakes, and you are nutty asking anyone for advice on that!!!!

Jmtreu98 Posted 26 Aug 2008 , 6:32pm
post #12 of 28
Quote:
Originally Posted by sadsmile

Quote:
Originally Posted by 2muchsugar

Okay, I know how ambitious it is to even attempt a borderless fondant cake, but I have a design that requires it. Does anyone have the secret or at least an idea how people accomplish this? I can come pretty close, but it seems like no matter how careful I am, I can never reach Elisa Strauss' expertise!

Any thoughts would be appreciated!


Um are you kidding me here??? Your gold and chocolate cake looks to be borderless and gorgeous!!! Just do that!




I agree. Your gold and chocolate cake is beautiful! Looks perfect! I would kill to be able to do that!!!!!!!!

BREN28 Posted 26 Aug 2008 , 6:36pm
post #13 of 28

2muchsugar, all of your cakes are so beautiful!! love them all !!! icon_biggrin.gif

PinkZiab Posted 26 Aug 2008 , 6:36pm
post #14 of 28

I don't tuck the fondant under, I elevate the cake on something smaller (as someone mentioned above) and bring the fondant straight down covering the side of the board (I use masonite cake circles), then using a very sharp knife I cut the fondant off flush with the bottom of the cake circle. You must use a VERY sharp knife to ensure it's a clean cut. This is also where good stacking skills come into play, since if your dowels are even a smidge too long, the cake will not sit flush on top of the cake below, ruining the borderless look. I also "grout" all of my stacked cakes where they join with "border icing" (shortening, mixed with PS and corn syrup) for an absolutely clean look (learned that trick at Pink Cake Box).

cherrycakes Posted 26 Aug 2008 , 6:37pm
post #15 of 28

Just a quick question...if you wrap the fondant underneath the cake board, does it make it difficult to cut and serve the cake?

2muchsugar Posted 26 Aug 2008 , 7:09pm
post #16 of 28

Thanks you guys, you're very sweet... I guess I am a bit picky. Don't we all want to have perfect edges? I generally try to tuck the fondant underneath the cake board, but it seems like there are always gaps. But you guys have given me some great ideas. I like the masonite board idea... I might try that next.

Thanks again, you guys are great in a pinch!

alanahodgson Posted 26 Aug 2008 , 10:04pm
post #17 of 28
Quote:
Originally Posted by PinkZiab

I I also "grout" all of my stacked cakes where they join with "border icing" (shortening, mixed with PS and corn syrup) for an absolutely clean look.




Tara,

I'd love to hear more about this. Can you explain?

KoryAK Posted 26 Aug 2008 , 10:50pm
post #18 of 28

I elevate my cake for covering, then cut off flush with a sharp CLEAN knife. Stack immediately and use your hand or the fondant smoother to push it down until it touches. Don't push just at the bottom, put the pressure on the whole side of the cake. Works great.

jules1719 Posted 26 Aug 2008 , 11:07pm
post #19 of 28
Quote:
Originally Posted by PinkZiab

I don't tuck the fondant under, I elevate the cake on something smaller (as someone mentioned above) and bring the fondant straight down covering the side of the board (I use masonite cake circles), then using a very sharp knife I cut the fondant off flush with the bottom of the cake circle. You must use a VERY sharp knife to ensure it's a clean cut. This is also where good stacking skills come into play, since if your dowels are even a smidge too long, the cake will not sit flush on top of the cake below, ruining the borderless look. I also "grout" all of my stacked cakes where they join with "border icing" (shortening, mixed with PS and corn syrup) for an absolutely clean look (learned that trick at Pink Cake Box).




This is one way, but I find it fussy. You absolutely want your dowels a smidge below the fondant surface.

Anyway, I cover the cakes and use a smoother always smoothing from the top edge down. You want to press the smoother into the side of the cake and also into the surface of the table the cake sits on. This creates a clean edge. Then I use a rotary cutter (pizza wheel) to cut the excess away. A quick once over with the smoother makes the cleanest of edges. You can also use royal to grout the seam.

I realize we are talking about clean edges with no bottom border, but sometimes it's nice to run out a fondant rope on a small round die of a fondant gun and wrap this around the edge. It's also a really clean look.

brendaonline Posted 27 Aug 2008 , 4:28am
post #20 of 28
Quote:
Quote:

I realize we are talking about clean edges with no bottom border, but sometimes it's nice to run out a fondant rope on a small round die of a fondant gun and wrap this around the edge. It's also a really clean look.





Aha! Duh!

I tried to roll snakes for a border and I couldn't get it even for the life of me, then it was drying too. That makes much more sense.

2muchsugar Posted 4 Sep 2008 , 3:55am
post #21 of 28

Just thought I'd update you on my borderless experiments icon_biggrin.gif This is the cake that needed the borderless tiers...it's a replica of one of Elisa Strauss' cakes. I trimmed the fondant with a sharp knife and then immediately stacked it. Then, I took the advice to smooth it down to the next tier so that there wouldn't be a gap. Worked really well I thought! Thanks again for your help guys!
LL

janelwaters Posted 4 Sep 2008 , 11:13am
post #22 of 28

WOW! that cake is amazing!!! GREAT GREAT JOB!! It is just beautiful!!

staceyboots Posted 4 Sep 2008 , 11:57am
post #23 of 28
Quote:
Originally Posted by alanahodgson

Quote:
Originally Posted by PinkZiab

I I also "grout" all of my stacked cakes where they join with "border icing" (shortening, mixed with PS and corn syrup) for an absolutely clean look.



Tara,

I'd love to hear more about this. Can you explain?




I would love to hear more abut the "border icing" too!

MissRobin Posted 4 Sep 2008 , 1:55pm
post #24 of 28

I am going to third that on border icing, not quite sure what your talking about.

cous2010 Posted 4 Sep 2008 , 4:08pm
post #25 of 28
Quote:
Originally Posted by 2muchsugar

Just thought I'd update you on my borderless experiments icon_biggrin.gif This is the cake that needed the borderless tiers...it's a replica of one of Elisa Strauss' cakes. I trimmed the fondant with a sharp knife and then immediately stacked it. Then, I took the advice to smooth it down to the next tier so that there wouldn't be a gap. Worked really well I thought! Thanks again for your help guys!






Amazingly fantastic well job done icon_smile.gif I haven't attempted a tiered fondant cake yet, but I will soon and I can only hope it turns out looking half as good as yours do!

Kim_in_CajunCountry Posted 4 Sep 2008 , 8:49pm
post #26 of 28

What an amazing cake! I have never covered a cake in fondant and I have never attempted a tiered cake. I hope to get the nerve someday to try each (but probably not at the same time). You have accomplished both with skill and precision.

Bravo!

loriemoms Posted 12 Sep 2008 , 6:05am
post #27 of 28

I place my cake on a board as usual, then place it another board that is much larger. I ice it all the way down, over board number 1 (the board the cake is on) to cover it up. Then I put the fondant on and smooth it all the way to the bottom. I then take a drezen tool or other type tool and run it along the bottom of the base of the cake, so that it is but up tight against the bottom Then trim it. I lift it up with a spatula onto the next cake, and sometimes will need to use the tool again to tuck any extra.

If you use SPS, I use a plate one size smaller to place the cake on. You wont see the plastic edges this way.

woodthi32 Posted 12 Sep 2008 , 2:47pm
post #28 of 28

what's a drezen tool?

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