Dry, Chewy Fondant

Decorating By jjandhope Updated 11 Sep 2010 , 9:16pm by vannysmommy

jjandhope Posted 23 Aug 2008 , 3:59am
post #1 of 24

I love the way fondant cakes look, but have never eaten one. I tried my first one. It looks really pretty and it wasn't too hard to do. I iced the cake first with BC, then rolled my fondant to less than 1/4". It is dry and chewy and when you try to cut through it with a fork on the plate, you're like "what is this?". It is tough, dry and tastelss. My husband says maybe you just have to sacrifice taste for looks. I can't beleive people would still be using fondant is it all is this dry and tastes this way...there must be something wrong. HELP! PLEASE!

23 replies
sadsmile Posted 23 Aug 2008 , 4:08am
post #2 of 24

I make my own MMF and flavor it with any flavor I need extracts and oils both work but candy oils work better. I also add 1/4 tsp of salt to each recipie I make to balance the sweet. Every cake I have made with fondant even the adults will eat the fondant and it surprises me every time...lol Flavoring is the way to go. If you will wind up making a huge batch for a few cakes go with a standard vanilla and butter flavor as it goes with any flavor cake and icing.

Melvira Posted 23 Aug 2008 , 4:09am
post #3 of 24

Did you use Wilton fondnt? If so, that's your problem right there. Marshmallow fondant it actually quite good. Have you seen that recipe?

dellboi2u Posted 23 Aug 2008 , 4:14am
post #4 of 24

MM fondant is the way to go! You can flavor it any flavor you want, and children as well as adults eat it like candy,lol. I give my extras to my kids to play with and they love it too! I let my 2 year old play with regular play dough and he tried to eat it,lol. He didn't know what was going on. Try MM fondant for sure, I know you will like it much better!

jjandhope Posted 23 Aug 2008 , 4:16am
post #5 of 24

Yes, I used Wilton. I didn't know that was bad. I am not a cake decorator or anything, so I didn't know. Is the other stuff hard to make? So are yall saying that most fondant is soft and tastes good?

jjandhope Posted 23 Aug 2008 , 4:16am
post #6 of 24

Yes, I used Wilton. I didn't know that was bad. I am not a cake decorator or anything, so I didn't know. Is the other stuff hard to make? So are yall saying that most fondant is soft and tastes good?

jibbies Posted 23 Aug 2008 , 4:22am
post #7 of 24

I only use Wilton fondant for inedible pars of the cake such as bows. I know many of our members here use the mmf recipe, I only use Satin Ice fondant you can purchase it on line fron intotheoven.com It has a pleasant taste(vanilla) and is very easy to work with. Don't give up on fondant it really can be a fun medium to work with. Also a lot of people are turned off by the texture and pull it off and just eat the cake and icing underneath. I happen to like the taste of fondant. don't give up.

Jibbies

sadsmile Posted 23 Aug 2008 , 4:24am
post #8 of 24

MMF...Marshmallow Fondant is fairly easy to make.. like bread dough. it may take a couple times to get the right consistancy and to learn your favorite tricks for working with it. But it tastes like circus peanuts and then add any flavor you want! Just always buy brand name fresh marshmellows to use!
Ingredients
16 ounces white mini marshmallows (use a good quality brand)
2-3 tablespoons water
2 tablespoons of flavor (I use 1-Almond and 1-butter)

2 lbs icing sugar (use the stuff in the bag, it works better)
1/2 cup Crisco shortening (you will be digging into it so place in a very easily accessed bowl)
Directions


1. Melt marshmallows and 2 tablespoons of water in a microwave or double boiler: Put the bowl in the microwave for 30 seconds, open microwave and stir, back in microwave for 30 seconds more, open microwave and stir again, and continue doing this until melted. If you want your batch all one color, add your color now.


2. It usually takes about 2 ½ minutes total. Place 3/4 of the powdered sugar on the top of the melted marshmallow mix.


3. Now grease your hands GENEROUSLY - palms, backs and in between fingers, then heavily grease the counter you will be using and dump the bowl of marshmallow/sugar mixture in the middle.


4. Start kneading like you would bread dough. You will immediately see why you have greased your hands. Keep kneading, this stuff is sticky at this stage! Add the rest of the powdered sugar and knead some more.


5. Re-grease your hands and counter when the fondant is sticking. If the mix is tearing easily, it is to dry, so add water (about ½ tablespoon at a time then knead it in). It usually takes me about 8 minutes to get a firm smooth elastic ball so that it will stretch without tearing when you apply it to the cake. If you want your fondant different colors, break off the amount of fondant you want 1 color. Add your color to the center of the ball, and start kneading through.


6. Its best if you can let it sit, double wrapped, overnight (but you can use it right away if there are no tiny bits of dry powdered sugar). If you do see them, you will need to knead and maybe add a few more drops of water.


7. Prepare the fondant for storing by coating it with a good layer of Crisco shortening, wrap in a plastic- type wrap product and then put it in a re-sealable or Ziploc bag. Squeeze out as much air as possible. Any bits of undissolved sugar will absorb over time or just pick them out when working it before rolling it out.


8. MM Fondant will hold very well in the refrigerator for weeks or you can leave it on the counter. I don't like putting mine in the fridge. If I know that I have a cake to decorate, I usually make 2 batches on a free night during the week so it is ready when I need it. Take advantage of the fact that this fondant can be prepared well in advance.

sadsmile Posted 23 Aug 2008 , 4:27am
post #9 of 24

ahh don't give me credit for this recipie.. I forgot to say that I got this from another cakester who got it from somewhere .. that came from who knows where...lol

Melvira Posted 23 Aug 2008 , 4:28am
post #10 of 24

Yah, Wilton is the nastiest, most inedible slag on the planet. It works like a dream, tastes like a nightmare! icon_razz.gif

Try the MMF and I bet you'll change your opinion of fondant! Good stuff!

jjandhope Posted 23 Aug 2008 , 4:38am
post #11 of 24

thank you all so much! I will try the MM fondant asap. I am so discouraged that I need to do it right and have a good success story! Once it is made, do I work it the same way as the Wilton (rolling out, using confectioners sugar)? What will the consistency be when I apply it to the cake? the Wilton was very dry even then. Will this be moist and gooey or what? Also, sorry about the ignorance, but when you say icing sugar, do you mean powdered? Just learnin..thanks

sadsmile Posted 23 Aug 2008 , 4:41am
post #12 of 24

it works nice and is flexible. Some use crisco some use powdered sugar and some use corn starch to roll out. you have to find what you like. icing sugar is powdered sugar 10x

jjandhope Posted 29 Aug 2008 , 12:41am
post #13 of 24

Okay, I made the MMF last night and I have a cake that I baked last night. I am going to fill and frost with BC and then I am going to try the fondant. I am a little worried about rolling it out. I am so afraid it will be tough and dry like the previous ones. Any last minute suggestions? Thanks

Melvira Posted 29 Aug 2008 , 1:16am
post #14 of 24

If it is at all tough or dry... knead in some Crisco. Don't be shy. That will make it nice and pliable!! Good luck!

jjandhope Posted 29 Aug 2008 , 1:38am
post #15 of 24

I did it! I used Crisco to roll it out. When I look at it up close, it is not as smooth as glass, but it is smooth. I'm not sure what its supposed to look like. I do like that it has a sheen, which the wilton fondant did not have. I pinched off a bit of this and it was good. Do I leave it out, store in fridge or cover it? How long will it be good? Can I sample it now or does it need to set? Thank you so much for all your help!

jjandhope Posted 29 Aug 2008 , 1:40am
post #16 of 24

just to clarify...my questions about the storage were concerning the cake, not the fondant. Thanx

lilahcakes Posted 29 Aug 2008 , 3:18am
post #17 of 24

Can you use MMF on tiered cakes, will it hold up?

mommyle Posted 29 Aug 2008 , 3:59am
post #18 of 24
Quote:
Originally Posted by jjandhope

I did it! I used Crisco to roll it out. When I look at it up close, it is not as smooth as glass, but it is smooth. I'm not sure what its supposed to look like. I do like that it has a sheen, which the wilton fondant did not have. I pinched off a bit of this and it was good. Do I leave it out, store in fridge or cover it? How long will it be good? Can I sample it now or does it need to set? Thank you so much for all your help!




Hey there! Welcome to the wonderful world of CC, and good working with fondant!!!

Smooth is good. Keep working and it will get better (not that I've seen a photo. I'm not judging.). As they say, practice makes perfect!

If you don't want a sheen, dust with Powdered Sugar (Icing Sugar, or aka PS).

Store your cake in the fridge. Particularly with certain filllings, like custard, anything creamy, or something that needs to be refridgerated.

It will last double wrapped in a ziplock for a couple of months (the fondant, not the cake). Cake only lasts as long as you don't eat it.

They SAY that you should let it sit for 24 hours. Personally, I have used it right away.

Good luck!

mommyle Posted 29 Aug 2008 , 4:03am
post #19 of 24
Quote:
Originally Posted by lilpinupgirl

Can you use MMF on tiered cakes, will it hold up?




You should be properly stacking tiered cakes whatever your covering. Dowels and separators every 4 inches. Please ask if you aren't sure about stacking cakes, and we will be more than happy to help! But, YES, you can certainly stack a MM fondant covered cake.

I would like to take the opportunity here to point you towards Michele Foster's fondant recipe here on the site. It is incredible. I find that it is more buttery than the MMF, and the adults that I know who HATE fondant actually like and eat Michele Foster's.

Good luck!

mclaren Posted 29 Aug 2008 , 5:21am
post #20 of 24

my first ever fondant was michele foster's. prior to that i've never worked with fondant, nor have i tasted fondant.

on my 1st attempt with michele foster's, i added in a lot of flavor oils, & the taste was awesome.

i'm wondering if we can flavor store bought fondant like pettinice (i heard the taste is at par with that of satin ice) or even yucky wilton, to make the taste a bit presentable?

Melvira Posted 29 Aug 2008 , 11:45am
post #21 of 24

You can certainly knead flavoring into store bought fondant, but you may have to also add more powdered sugar to counteract the liquid. Otherwise it will become sticky and too soft.

Honestly though, I would suggest only using the Wilton stuff for non-edible decorations. Stuff that you leave out to dry so you know no one is going to eat it. I'm not trying to be mean toward Wilton, but just based on how it smells when you open it, I don't care how much flavoring you put in it, I don't want that in my mouth. It smells like glue, and I'm guessing has some of the same ingredients. icon_confused.gificon_razz.gif But, it's seriously unbeatable for workability. That's the shame... it's great to work with, but I wouldn't eat it if you paid me. (Well... if you were willing to pay a LOT I might! Hehehe!) icon_rolleyes.gif

lilahcakes Posted 29 Aug 2008 , 12:35pm
post #22 of 24

Where can I find Michele Fosters fondant recipe. I looked, but i must be looking in the wrong place. icon_cry.gif

lilahcakes Posted 29 Aug 2008 , 12:47pm
post #23 of 24

I found it!!

vannysmommy Posted 11 Sep 2010 , 9:16pm
post #24 of 24

can you color mmf like you can any other fondant?

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