Cracking Cakes

Decorating By SweetEvents Updated 23 Aug 2008 , 2:41am by michellenj

SweetEvents Posted 22 Aug 2008 , 8:43pm
post #1 of 6

It seems as though all of my round cakes have been cracking in the middle lately. I can't figure out what the problem is. They crack and within an hour of that there is no hope the fall apart into pieces.
Any feedback would rock!

5 replies
funbun Posted 22 Aug 2008 , 8:56pm
post #2 of 6

Are you using a mix or scratch recipe? And what temp and how long are you baking them for?
Sorry for your troubles. I'm sure one of us can help!!!

abslu Posted 22 Aug 2008 , 11:24pm
post #3 of 6

Mine never crack. I let them sit after the come out of the oven for 10 minutes in the pan. Then I turn them over on a cooling rack and let them completely cool, then it's into the freezer! I've never had a problem with them cracking. Then again, I'm a mix-baker!!! It could be different with scratch recipes. . . . good luck!!

:edited to say: make sure that when the cakes cool, that they are completely supported. . . . that might help too!!

TC123 Posted 22 Aug 2008 , 11:43pm
post #4 of 6

Hi. I do what abslu does, except I don't put mine in the freezer. I bake from scratch and do not have a problem with my rounds cracking.

The few times I DID was either when I did not wait until the layers were cool enough before handling them or I did not have them properly supported (while moving them from point A to point B).

HTH! icon_smile.gif

kakeladi Posted 22 Aug 2008 , 11:52pm
post #5 of 6

O.k......do the cakes hav e a hump on ;them when they c ome out of the oven? When you de-pan them do you turn it out onto a rack, then flip it over so it's now resting on what was the bottom when in the pan?
There are many ways to handle a cake if it bakes up w/a hump in the middle.
One is to turn the oven down - baking maybe a few minutes longer b ut at a lower temp (anywhere from 3oo to 325 degrees).
Another is to put a rack on the cake while it is in the pan, almost as soon as it comes out of the oven and gently push the hump down.
Still another is to level the cake in the pan using the top sides of the pan as a guide so you have a perfect 2" high layer. You can use a cake leveler or a long knife.
My preference is the 1st option.

michellenj Posted 23 Aug 2008 , 2:41am
post #6 of 6

That stinkin' hump will get you every time. Listen to kakeladi.

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