Decorating Cookies

Decorating By tktexasgirl Updated 23 Aug 2008 , 2:04pm by Kim_in_CajunCountry

tktexasgirl Posted 21 Aug 2008 , 2:30pm
post #1 of 22

hey everyone, I am decorating cookies this weekend. This will be my first attempt at it. Can anyone give me any pointers from things they have learned. I plan on baking sugar cookies and using royal icing, unless of course yall can suggest something better. Thanks for all your help and God Bless.

21 replies
PinkZiab Posted 21 Aug 2008 , 3:12pm
post #2 of 22

I like to use fondant for my cookies with royal icing details. I like the clean look and it's much easier on my carpal tunnel ridden hands lol.

tktexasgirl Posted 21 Aug 2008 , 3:37pm
post #3 of 22

thank you, when you use the fondant do you use the same techinque as when you use fondant on a cake. Buttercream first then fondant on top?

squeaky121603 Posted 22 Aug 2008 , 12:21am
post #4 of 22

I also use fondant to cover my sugar cookes. But, I use a little bit of corn syrup applied to the cookes with a small brush and then just cut out the fondant with cookie cutters and place right on top. If you want any details, just pipe it on with royal icing. HTH

tktexasgirl Posted 22 Aug 2008 , 12:29am
post #5 of 22

thank you so much, i am excited about trying them this weekend.

Tona Posted 22 Aug 2008 , 12:38am
post #6 of 22

I also use fondant and I use a little piping gel to stick the fondant on the cookies

foxymomma521 Posted 22 Aug 2008 , 12:46am
post #7 of 22

I put the fondant on when the cookies come out of the oven...

plbennett_8 Posted 22 Aug 2008 , 3:18am
post #8 of 22
Quote:
Originally Posted by foxymomma521

I put the fondant on when the cookies come out of the oven...




Yep...nothing else needed just have the fondant cut out and ready when the cookies come out of the oven. Slap it on there, and Viola! Pretty Cookies icon_smile.gif

sambugjoebear Posted 22 Aug 2008 , 12:28pm
post #9 of 22

I use royal icing for my cookies. Some things that I've learned: 1) use tip 2-3 for outlines with med-stiff icing. 2) it's easier and cleaner to use a squeeze bottle to flood color into the outline instead of using a pastry bag w/ tip 1 (you don't have to worry about it leaking out the top or bottom when it's not in use). 3) Start w/ the ugly cookies first bc your icing job will get prettier as you go and you want to save that for the pretty cookies icon_smile.gif 4) Have fun! If you start getting frustrated bc they're not turning out how you wanted, walk away for 10 minutes to collect yourself and then try again. You'll do better with a cool head. I know I don't always stay calm *blush* even if they ARE just cookies. I'm a perfectiionist when it comes to baking. lol

tktexasgirl Posted 22 Aug 2008 , 2:10pm
post #10 of 22

Thank you everyone for your help and suggestions.
icon_biggrin.gif

Kim_in_CajunCountry Posted 22 Aug 2008 , 2:38pm
post #11 of 22

I can add that it's important to keep your dough cold throughout the process, which may mean sticking in the fridge/freezer between steps.

I mix my dough and roll it between sheets of parchment so that I don't have to chill it before rolling it.

Then, I place the rolled dough (still between the sheets of parchment) on a cookie sheet and place in the fridge. Once it's chilled, I remove a pan from the fridge, remove the top sheet of parchment, and cut out the cookies quickly so the dough doesn't get too warm, then I place the cut out cookies on a pan lined with parchment paper and stick it in the freezer for a bit. Then I put the tray of cold, stiff cookies in the oven and bake just until the edges turn golden. You don't want to leave them in the oven too long, because they continue to cook after you remove them from the oven and you don't want them to darken too much.

Keeping the dough chilled prevents it from being sticky and difficult to handle. Baking really cold (or frozen) cookies prevents them from spreading.

I love using parchment paper since it eliminates any problems with sticking. Also, you can move an entire sheet of cookies from the pan to a cooling rack.

I also use disposable bags to pipe outlines and bottles to flood. Another advantage of using bottles is that if your flood icing is too thick, you can add a bit of water, stir it up in the bottle (try not to make bubbles), and get back to work.

I guess the planets were in alignment when I baked and decorated my first cookies, because I was very happy with the results, but I'm always looking for ways to improve the process. Some day (in my spare time icon_rolleyes.gif ) I would love to do a start to finish tutorial on my cookie making & decorating method. When others explain their techniques, I always learn something new, so I'd like to share mine in the hopes that it might help someone else.

Good luck. And feel free to ask as many questions as you need to!

hallfamily727 Posted 22 Aug 2008 , 3:01pm
post #12 of 22

I use marshmallow fondant on cookies with antonia74's royal icing for accents. I put the fondant on the cookies right when they come out of the oven.

I also use the No Fail Sugar Cookie recipe found here and do mine a little differently. I roll mine out between pieces of wax paper when the dough is fresh. Then I cut and lay on cookie sheets. Then I stick the cookie sheet in the freezer for 5-10 minutes. They go from the freezer straight to the oven.

Hope this helps!

cakeymom Posted 22 Aug 2008 , 3:23pm
post #13 of 22

I'm going to piggyback on this discussion.

I've purchased two cookie cutters; one Fleur Di Lis to make some N. O. Saints themed cookies and a crown/tiara for a niece that is having a Cinderella themed b'day party in Nov.

I'm thinking about making my own fondant and piping with RI.

How thick do you roll your cookies?

What fondant recipe should I use?

Also, I'm going to use the No Fail Sugar cookie recipe.

Thanks,

cakeymom

hallfamily727 Posted 22 Aug 2008 , 3:34pm
post #14 of 22

I roll my cookies about 1/2 - 3/4 inch thick b/c I hate risking breakage.

sweetideas Posted 22 Aug 2008 , 3:46pm
post #15 of 22

Is there a thread that discusses just flooding? I had a terrible time trying to get mine pretty with flooding...I was also afraid to make the RI too think because I needed to stack them the next day and was afraid they wouldn't be set enough.

sweetideas Posted 22 Aug 2008 , 3:47pm
post #16 of 22

Is there a thread that discusses just flooding? I had a terrible time trying to get mine pretty with flooding...I was also afraid to make the RI too think because I needed to stack them the next day and was afraid they wouldn't be set enough.

Rosie2 Posted 22 Aug 2008 , 4:11pm
post #17 of 22

Hi, I love making cookies and I'm also a perfectionst so, it's a long process for me icon_smile.gif
I use royal icing and fondant accents, but had used fondant in the past. Fondant looks so neat! thumbs_up.gif

Tip #1: I never add baking powder to the cookie recepie to prevent them from loosing its shape when I bake them.

Tip #2: after you cut the cookie put it in your baking sheet and in the freezer for about 4mnts. This keeps them from spreading when I bake.

Good luck!

marccrand Posted 22 Aug 2008 , 4:12pm
post #18 of 22

I use Antonia74 icing (in the recipe forum) It still dries hard enough to stack but not quite so hard on your teeth as RI. I also really like using fondant. Either one can be impressive depending on what look you're going for.

I've used rolled buttercream a few times. It doesn't dry quite as hard, though I did stack a couple. It was such a challenge to work with icon_mad.gificon_mad.gif but SO YUMMY! If anyone has some pointers for that, I'd love to be able to use it more often. thumbs_up.gif

sweetflowers Posted 22 Aug 2008 , 4:23pm
post #19 of 22

I use RBC also on my cookies. I roll it between parchment paper also and cut it out. Then put it in the freezer. Once the cookies come out of the oven, you remove the already cut RBC and put it on the cookie while hot (just like with fondant). Freezing the RBC makes it so much easier to handle!!!

sammie192 Posted 23 Aug 2008 , 7:14am
post #20 of 22

hi I have a problem getting a ture black I just made frog and monkey cookies. I want to outline in blk. but ended up with a dark gray . they turn out very nice just not what i want.

iramirez94 Posted 23 Aug 2008 , 7:38am
post #21 of 22

I tried rbc once and I had a horrible time. I am getting better with RI. I just love decorating cookies.... icon_lol.gif

-I use NFSC and have also made Pennys cookies.
-I use parchment paper to roll out and line cookie sheets

I am enjoying the practice.

BTW.. my 4 year old twin daughters are also catching the cookie decorating bug.

Kim_in_CajunCountry Posted 23 Aug 2008 , 2:04pm
post #22 of 22
Quote:
Originally Posted by sammie192

hi I have a problem getting a ture black I just made frog and monkey cookies. I want to outline in blk. but ended up with a dark gray . they turn out very nice just not what i want.




I'm guessing that you're using Wilton paste. I had the same problem the first time I decorated cookies. Of course, I immediately consulted CC and found that you can get a great black color by adding dark cocoa powder to the dark gray icing. You may have to add a little more water if it makes the icing too stiff. Mix it in until it's almost black. It will get darker over time.

This is what it will look like.

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