How Do I Bake A Whole Lot Of 3 Inch Cakes?

Decorating By Pebbles1727 Updated 22 Aug 2008 , 11:11pm by Pebbles1727

Pebbles1727 Posted 21 Aug 2008 , 2:54am
post #1 of 19

Please, please help. I'm trying to figure out what is the most efficient way to bake mini cakes, 3 inch in diameter. several little pans just don't seem like the best way. Any suggestions?
Thanks in advance, P

18 replies
PinkZiab Posted 21 Aug 2008 , 2:57am
post #2 of 19

Bake thin layers in a shallow sheet pan (jelly roll) and cut them with a 3" round cutter. You can stack, fill and frost them just like you would a regular layer cake. Use the scraps for cake balls! lol

Pebbles1727 Posted 21 Aug 2008 , 3:12pm
post #3 of 19

I considered that, but won't the 3 inch cutter squish the edges? Or is it why you think a thin layer vs a 2 inch pan be better? But if the layers are thin, do I need to reinforce them with something that they won't slide around with filling, with the whole heighth-diameter ratio? Sorry for so many questions, but I have not done this before. Need to make at least 50 preferrably 100 cakes and it just seems like a really daunting task.
Thanks, P

Cakechick123 Posted 21 Aug 2008 , 5:20pm
post #4 of 19

I saved up a whole lot of small tuna tins and use that to bake my mini cakes in. The one chain here in South Africa sells them in exactly 3" tins. My family ate tuna for months, but now I have over 100 tins icon_smile.gif it works great for those minis.
Maybe you can find a product that has a similar tin where you are.

Pebbles1727 Posted 21 Aug 2008 , 5:28pm
post #5 of 19

do you put them on a cookie sheet or you just stick each one of them in the oven individually?
P

Cakechick123 Posted 21 Aug 2008 , 5:36pm
post #6 of 19

stick them on a cookie sheet icon_smile.gif I can fit two sheets in my oven at the same time, so I get about 50 baked at a time.
Originally I only had 50 tins, but the waiting for them to cool and washing before re-using made me collect another 50 now I can get 100 baked in record time. Its the decorating thats a real pain!

PinkGiGi Posted 21 Aug 2008 , 6:43pm
post #7 of 19
Quote:
Originally Posted by riana

I saved up a whole lot of small tuna tins and use that to bake my mini cakes in. The one chain here in South Africa sells them in exactly 3" tins. My family ate tuna for months, but now I have over 100 tins icon_smile.gif it works great for those minis.
Maybe you can find a product that has a similar tin where you are.





Oh my gosh, this is such a great idea! Did you have to adjust the oven temperature any???

PinkZiab Posted 21 Aug 2008 , 6:53pm
post #8 of 19
Quote:
Quote:

I considered that, but won't the 3 inch cutter squish the edges? Or is it why you think a thin layer vs a 2 inch pan be better? But if the layers are thin, do I need to reinforce them with something that they won't slide around with filling, with the whole height-diameter ratio? Sorry for so many questions, but I have not done this before. Need to make at least 50 preferably 100 cakes and it just seems like a really daunting task




No, no squishing. LOL We built tons of cakes this way in culinary school--not just minis. I have built 6" and 8" cakes using this method. The cake layers are usually 1/4"-1/2" thick, depending on the recipe, and I've never had an issue with sliding layers or anything. It's no different than baking a cake and slicing it into layers of the same thickness. You just have to make sure your filling layers are proportionate to the cake layers. Like any cake, too much filling would cause problems.

woodthi32 Posted 21 Aug 2008 , 6:59pm
post #9 of 19

If you are worried about squishing, you could cut them cold..............

jibbies Posted 21 Aug 2008 , 7:00pm
post #10 of 19

The tuna can idea is great. If you have to do it soon, I would suggest baking layers and cutting out the 3 inch circle, fill and stack. I did these that way. It doesn't tear or mash the edges if you place the cutter on and twist like opening a jar.
http://www.cakecentral.com/cake-photo_1061703.html

Jibbies

Cakechick123 Posted 21 Aug 2008 , 7:16pm
post #11 of 19
Quote:
Originally Posted by PinkGiGi

Quote:
Originally Posted by riana

I saved up a whole lot of small tuna tins and use that to bake my mini cakes in. The one chain here in South Africa sells them in exactly 3" tins. My family ate tuna for months, but now I have over 100 tins icon_smile.gif it works great for those minis.
Maybe you can find a product that has a similar tin where you are.




Oh my gosh, this is such a great idea! Did you have to adjust the oven temperature any???




I bake at 300 deg. They take about 20 min, a little longer than cup cakes.

Pebbles1727 Posted 21 Aug 2008 , 8:13pm
post #12 of 19

Thank you all so much for all of the options. One of my friends has suggested that I may also consider using chicago metallic 6 cup molten cake pan. Supposedly it'll make 6 3x2 round cakes. Any of you have experience with that?

Also, cutting cakes out of one sheet cake, in your experience, if I use a jelly roll pan (15 inch), would I be able to cut out 5 3 inch cakes in a row? I know that it works mathematically, but in reality with shrinkage and such, is it possible? Or should I consider that I can only cut 4 in a row, and need to accomodate for that in a number of sheet cakes to bake?
Thanks, P

hammer1 Posted 21 Aug 2008 , 10:17pm
post #13 of 19

do they have to be round? if not bake your sheet cake and freeze it slightly and cut out you squares or circles. What are you icing with. We did these last year for the high school staff...baked sheet cakes cut out hearts...filled them with riches bettercreme and ganached each cake and decorated with a leaf and a fondant flower. this was a lot faster than trying to ice each cake with buttercream or fondant them...we did bake the cakes and cut them out and freeze them ahead of time.

Pebbles1727 Posted 22 Aug 2008 , 12:15am
post #14 of 19

what flavor cakes did you make? I was planning on doing them in 4 different flavors (20-25 of each variety), so buttercream was my original idea. Can ganache be adapted to different flavors? I never worked wit it, so my understanding that it was basically chocolate and cream.
Thanks, P

hammer1 Posted 22 Aug 2008 , 2:52am
post #15 of 19

we did chocolate cakes, and this was my high school class of inexperienced kids that did this activity.
I have ganached chocolate and white cakes. I tried the mouse filling on this site and used chocolate chip instant pudding in it, used this for filling in a white cake and ganached it, the combination was great.
I have not done white ganache but others on this site have.
I like this technique because you put your cakes on a cooling rack with room around them. Place the rack on a clean jelly roll pan, or any pan with edges. Pour the ganache over the top and let the cake ice itself. scoop up the leftovers and reuse. If the cakes are a little cold they don't crumb as much. Try it with a sample cake and see how it goes. You might have to spoon a little over some spots on the side to make sure everything is covered. Then chill to set up the chocolate.
How are you packaging. We packed our cakes in individual plastic boxes.
If you backed individual cakes, like in the tuna cans, you might think of just splitting them, filling with mouse and then just ganaching the tops. For just the tops you let the ganache cool a little so it thickens up a little.
If I have my kids cakes on this computer I will post it, Not sure which computer the picture is on.

Pebbles1727 Posted 22 Aug 2008 , 2:56am
post #16 of 19

Oh, I'd appreciate a picture, that way I know what I'm sriving for. The cakes with go into individual 4x4 boxes with top and side window.
P

hammer1 Posted 22 Aug 2008 , 1:18pm
post #17 of 19

don't have the picture to post sorry, just pour plenty of gqnache over the tops and make sure the sides get covers, easy...don't mess too long on the top just a swirl and let it flow. it sets up beautiful and is shiny. Lot on cc say to use special chocolate, I used Nestles chocolate chips and heavy whipping cream and it is great. 1 c plus 2 T whipping cream heat till hot. throw in a bag of chip (2 c. size) and let them sit for a few minutes. give it a stir till smooth and start glazing.

hammer1 Posted 22 Aug 2008 , 10:18pm
post #18 of 19

ok ...I went out to school found the picture of the kids mini cakes and uploaded them to my cake page, Hope it helps.
Schools starts next Monday for me...if your schools starts next week, you better get to baking.
icon_smile.gif

Pebbles1727 Posted 22 Aug 2008 , 11:11pm
post #19 of 19

Thanks a bunch, P

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