Foam Boards?

Business By SugaredUp Updated 26 Aug 2008 , 4:46pm by BlakesCakes

SugaredUp Posted 20 Aug 2008 , 6:20pm
post #1 of 18

Where do you get yours? I just got Sharon's stacking dvd and really like how the foam boards give the tiers added height. I want to use them, but I already quoted my cake price, and didn't realize how expensive they are. At Michael's, they are $6 each. I need 4 of them! I am probably going to raise my "delivery" price to absorb this cost in the future, but on this order, whatever extra I spend is out of pocket.

Please let me know if you have seen them cheaper. The cheapest I've found online is $5.79 each, and you have to buy at least 10.

TIA!

17 replies
flamingobaker Posted 20 Aug 2008 , 10:35pm
post #2 of 18

I get mine at Michael's, but I don't do a lot of cakes. I have not bought them in a while because the last time I went they were on sale for $1.00 each! icon_biggrin.gif
Keep an eye out for THAT sale!

I use the ones that are about 1/4 in. I don't remember that they were that expensive at regular price.

SweetArt Posted 21 Aug 2008 , 1:50pm
post #3 of 18

I buy mine at Hobby Lobby. They at $2 for 1/4" and $4 for 1/2". I only buy them when they have a 50% off sale on them and then I go and clear the store out. They are on sale this week. If you have a store near you, go stock up.

dshlent Posted 22 Aug 2008 , 1:37pm
post #4 of 18

what size of foam board would you need for 12"x18" cake?? I didn't know if the 1/4 would be sturdy enough or if they 1/2 would be over kill.....

Thanks....

SugaredUp Posted 22 Aug 2008 , 8:09pm
post #5 of 18

Sugar Shack's dvd says to use 1/2 " boards. Those are the expensive ones. The others are less $.

SweetArt Posted 22 Aug 2008 , 8:40pm
post #6 of 18

I use a 1/2" board on any cake 12" and up. And always a 1/2" on sheet cakes. They're just long and awkward and need the extra support.

BlakesCakes Posted 22 Aug 2008 , 8:41pm
post #7 of 18

There's no need to use the 1/2 inch boards on every tier unless you really, really want that much extra height.

I use a 3/16th inch board under each tier, cut to the size of the tier. I use the 1/2 inch boards for the decorative/decorated display board. Because the 3/16th boards are 20x30 inches, you can cut several different tier boards out of one. I'd say that in genteral, I use most of 1 board for a 3 tier cake. This adds about $1 to the cost of the cake.

I buy my 3/16th boards from Michael's. They have sales several times a year where the boards run anywhere from .88 to $1 each.

I recently bought 1/2 inch boards in bulk because Hobby Lobby is too far for me to drive when they go on sale. The boards ran about $3.25 each, after adding postage.

http://www.artsupply.com/foamcore/sturdyboard.htm

HTH
RAe

SugaredUp Posted 23 Aug 2008 , 9:03pm
post #8 of 18

Blakescakes, wow! I checked that site and the sale must've started after I checked it. That's a really great price. Thank you!

Denise Posted 24 Aug 2008 , 4:13am
post #9 of 18

I bought some from them recently. There was a mix up and I got the 3/16 boards - 30 of them.

They sent the right ones (1/2") and told me to keep the 3/16's! I paid about 3.63 each with shipping!!! YOOO HOOOO!

mw902 Posted 24 Aug 2008 , 4:35am
post #10 of 18

I made the mistake of getting some from the dollar store, don't waste your money they are terrible! The paper is very, well, papery LOL and the foam is no where near sturdy enough!

BlakesCakes Posted 24 Aug 2008 , 4:47am
post #11 of 18
Quote:
Originally Posted by Denise

I bought some from them recently. There was a mix up and I got the 3/16 boards - 30 of them.

They sent the right ones (1/2") and told me to keep the 3/16's! I paid about 3.63 each with shipping!!! YOOO HOOOO!




The very same thing happened to me icon_eek.gif I bet somebody got fired in the warehouse!

When the original box came, I told my DH that there was no way 20, 1/2 inch boards were in the package.

They made it right almost overnight, too.

As for the Dollar Store 3/16th boards--I agree, those are some weird boards. The paper covering over the foamcore is like toilet paper. The ones from Michael's have a paper coating that is somewhat shiny & slick. It holds up to water, grease, etc. very well.

Rae

SugaredUp Posted 24 Aug 2008 , 11:42am
post #12 of 18

I did see the thinner ones at the $ store. I'm glad I didn't get any of those, then. But on SugarShack's dvd, it says to cover the boards first w/ plastic wrap to make them food safe. Would that have helped?

debster Posted 24 Aug 2008 , 12:06pm
post #13 of 18

What can you use to cut these boards>? Say if you need an Hexegon or an oval shape? Thanks icon_biggrin.gif

BlakesCakes Posted 24 Aug 2008 , 5:12pm
post #14 of 18

I cut my boards with a Creative Hot Marks hot knife (like an electrified exacto knife). I got mine at JoAnn's & I know that Michael's sells them, too.

http://benfranklin.com/CREATIVE-HOT-MARKS-TOOL-KIT16.5-WATT/M/B0013JLFL0.htm

As for covering them, Colette Peters doesn't, so I don't (that's the person who originally put me onto using these boards several years ago). I still choose not to cover them because I don't want the saran or foil to be cut and come up with the cake slices. I do wipe the boards down with a mild bleach solution before putting a cake on them.

Rae

debster Posted 24 Aug 2008 , 6:53pm
post #15 of 18

Blakescakes..............thanks for the information, one more question. Are we able to dowel down the center with the foam core boards? Thanks

BlakesCakes Posted 25 Aug 2008 , 1:07am
post #16 of 18
Quote:
Originally Posted by debster

Blakescakes..............thanks for the information, one more question. Are we able to dowel down the center with the foam core boards? Thanks




Yes, you can definitely dowel down the center--just pound it in the way you would thru cardboard.

The good news is that this doesn't absorb moisture, so it won't buckle when you drive in the dowel. It also doesn't have the "weakness" of the ridges of cardboard, so it won't respond to possible uneven pressure while driving in the dowel, thereby not bending at the center where the dowel is piercing it.

If you place the bottom tier on a piece of it (I always do), drive the sharpened dowel into that board and you have extra security, even if the final resting place for the cake is a metal plateau.

Rae

love2makecakes Posted 25 Aug 2008 , 5:28pm
post #17 of 18

So I just recently was introduced to the use of foam boards, I went to Michaels and I bought myself some... Now I have used one once and that was for a small 9" round cake and I used it only has the base. I set the cake onto a piece of wax paper because I was nervous that the paper layer on the foam would rub off onto the cake... If you do not cover the foam board with anything and use it as the seperator for stacked cakes, how do you avoid that (the paper rubbing off or coming up went cutting)?

BlakesCakes Posted 26 Aug 2008 , 4:46pm
post #18 of 18

I cut many of my own cakes and find the paper coating to be extremely sturdy. I've never had it lift up with the cake.

Just my personal experience.
Rae

Quote by @%username% on %date%

%body%