Dh Wants To Buy A Restaurant

Lounge By frostingfairy Updated 21 Aug 2008 , 9:03pm by frostingfairy

frostingfairy Posted 20 Aug 2008 , 5:10pm
post #1 of 10

So my DH wants to buy a restaurant, preferably something already established that he can expand and possibly have live music....he keeps sending me links to BizQuest.....

Does he know anything about the restaurant business? No, he's a comedian (really).... do we have any money to buy a business? Not at all, we're barely scraping by as it is....

But....he's miserable working an office job, and would probably be good as the owner who hangs out in front (not as the chef or business manager)...

Any advice? Besides RUN!!!!!! icon_lol.gif

9 replies
Auryn Posted 20 Aug 2008 , 5:54pm
post #2 of 10

uhmm run REALLY FAST

maybe you should suggest that he get a pt job at a busy and established restaurant first
see how he feels after a month of that.

I also suggest that you watch 'ramsey's kitchen nightmare's", gives a better perspective on how hard it is.

I wonder if he has realized that he will have to work on all major holidays. When everyone is on vacation he will be working at the restaurant.

SweetArt Posted 20 Aug 2008 , 6:24pm
post #3 of 10
Quote:
Originally Posted by frostingfairy

...would probably be good as the owner who hangs out in front (not as the chef or business manager)...




That right there killed it. I have a husband like this too. Doesn't want to do the grunt work and wants to be the head-honcho who takes it easy and chit chats. The food service industry is the hardest to survive in. It's not for the take-it-easy crowd. I've known many owners who are there day and night. If someone calls out, they have to fill that spot. They work hard and are the jack-of-all-trades in their restaurant. I like the previous posters idea of watching Kitchen Nightmares. That's more the reality of how everyone has to do the work.

dinas27 Posted 20 Aug 2008 , 7:24pm
post #4 of 10

if he is serious make HIM write a business plan. Do all the market research.. pricing, figuring out costs, your family monetary situation, financing etc.

I also LOVE the idea of him working in a restaurant for a month... the business is so romanticized he needs to know that it will be hard work.

All that being said sometimes you have to take risks. Not everyone is meant to be in business, perhaps what he needs is just a job change... maitre d' perhaps? Something else in the service business?

indydebi Posted 20 Aug 2008 , 9:54pm
post #5 of 10
Quote:
Originally Posted by frostingfairy

...would probably be good as the owner who hangs out in front (not as the chef or business manager)...




This tells me he's more infatuated with the "idea" of being able to tell all his little friends that he's a business owner. he wants the title without doing any of the work. He thinks it's all glamour.

Boy, is HE in for a rude awakening! icon_surprised.gif Especially in a food-industry business!

FORCE him to watch Kitchen Nightmares (my favorite show!). Especially the one where the guy thought he was part of the local mafia or something (kept getting in screaming matches with the collectors who came to the restaurant, while at the same time he drove a BMW and got expensive manicures and teeth whitening. I luv'd it when Ramsey told him, "I just brush my teeth twice a day!" icon_lol.gif ) He needs to notice the common thread we've seen in a lot of these shows .... the place is going under because there is ONE guy who thinks everyone else has to do the work while this ONE guy collects all the cash and the kudos!

sadiepix Posted 20 Aug 2008 , 11:33pm
post #6 of 10

A male friend of mine has that same want..to be the front of the house guy who chats and is welcoming and basically just exuding bonhomie and drinks...while the rest of the staff work.

The advice he keeps getting from people is to become a bartender. Restaurant owners have the issues everyone stated above, and can easily end up in debt up to their ears or out of business. He has no kids or spouse so if he wants to take a chance he can, but he is actually looking to try out bartending in a nice place to see if that satisfies his need to chat and be friendly without doing *quite* the same backbreaking, and sometimes heartbreaking, labor that comes with ownership. (I am not saying bartending is easy...been there! Just less hard on the pocketbook and sanity as owning a place.)

Good luck to you and your hubby...I feel for him being stuck in a job he hates, I don't wish that on anyone. Working in a restaurant is a great idea, but longer than a month. Ya gotta feel the burnout before it hits home! I speak from awful, long-term experience!

mkolmar Posted 20 Aug 2008 , 11:44pm
post #7 of 10

ummm yeah. The food business industry is a chew you up and spit your out industry. It seems he is more in love with the idea and doesn't know anything about it. Does he know that the national average for a successful restaurant only make 2-4 cents out of every dollar. This includes those pricey 5 star restaurants. By the time you pay out rent, staffing fees, pay for loans on equipment, all the insurance you have to have and what not you are not going to make a killing.
The suggestion of a business plan is a good one. Having him get a job in a restaurant for at least 1 year minimum would be even better.

For some reason a lot of people have the idea that the food industry is a fun way to make good money. It's long hours, nights plus weekends and holidays. If someone calls off--your butt is there working and people love to call off, especially dishwashers for some reason. The average person who owns a restaurant will work around 13-16 hour days.

Have him talk to some business owners and get the truth about how things are.

MamaBerry Posted 21 Aug 2008 , 3:59am
post #8 of 10
Quote:
Originally Posted by indydebi

Quote:
Originally Posted by frostingfairy

...would probably be good as the owner who hangs out in front (not as the chef or business manager)...



This tells me he's more infatuated with the "idea" of being able to tell all his little friends that he's a business owner. he wants the title without doing any of the work. He thinks it's all glamour.

Boy, is HE in for a rude awakening! icon_surprised.gif Especially in a food-industry business!




Tell him to set up a weekly appointment with a foot doctor because he's going to need it. I have yet to meet anyone that stands 14+hrs. a day adn not need some foot help.

To the OP:

You are in my neck of the woods. I would STRONGLY advise that your husband go through the Stagiere/Work Study program at ICE (Institute of Culinary Education). It's 1600 hours (for either the pastry or culinary certification) but even if he doesn't finish the time he will get the wake-up call he desperaretly needs and the respect for the food if he is still in love with opening a resturant.

Aliwis000 Posted 21 Aug 2008 , 3:56pm
post #9 of 10

After owning their own print shop for 27 years my parents would LOVE to work for someone else. My little brother had to do a school thing about what your parents do for a job or something...you know the type of assignment anyway he asked if they liked their jobs and they just laughed and said ...lol

They would love to be able to:
1. Have a vacation (something they havent done in 7 years save for holidays)

2. Not be the one ultimatly responsible (when something goes wrong its their butt)

3. Not have to put up with the back part of the business (you know taxes, bills, etc)

4. Have health insurance. (yes the only one covered in my family is my lil bro, and thats just because he is a diabetic, and you wouldnt believe what it costs to insure him)

5. Be able to go to their kids school functions, doctor appointments etc together. My parents never get to do any of that together, its always one parent goes (if you are lucky) and one stays at work (if not both)

We have a lot of bar/restaurant owners as customers...I dont envy them. icon_smile.gif

Good luck with whatever you choose! Let us know.

~Alicia

frostingfairy Posted 21 Aug 2008 , 9:03pm
post #10 of 10

Well, fortunately (for me anyway icon_lol.gif ) the business broker DH was talking to told us that we don't have NEAR enough down payment for the type of establishment he wants to buy! So the pipe dream remains a pipe dream....

Thanks for all your responses.....y'all just confirmed what I thought all along.

Now, if we could just find him a new job, before he comes up with some other hare-brained scheme icon_lol.gif

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