Stacked 6, 8, And 10 Inch Cake?

Decorating By knel Updated 19 Aug 2008 , 2:04pm by leah_s

knel Posted 18 Aug 2008 , 11:20pm
post #1 of 13

I am doing a 6, 8, and 10 inch stacked cake. I will be traveling about an hour with it. If I use just the dowel rods (4 in each layer), cake board circles, and long dowel rod down through all three cakes, will this provide enough support? This is all I ever use for my 2 tier.

Thanks!

12 replies
annacakes Posted 18 Aug 2008 , 11:38pm
post #2 of 13

Well, this is a subject of debate too. I know people do transport fully assembled tiers but I would dowel the cakes, transport them separately in boxes then assemble on-site. It doesn't take too long and you can insert the centre dowel once all is in place.

I always play it safe. Have not had a "disaster" yet.

A.

CoutureCakeCreations Posted 18 Aug 2008 , 11:51pm
post #3 of 13

I always transport already assembled cakes. i have even done that with a 4 tiered cake. I use dowels in each supporting tier and then do one long dowel down the center.
Never had a problem and seemed to be very sturdy.

leah_s Posted 19 Aug 2008 , 12:00am
post #4 of 13

You should try SPS!!

yummymummy Posted 19 Aug 2008 , 12:03am
post #5 of 13

I also dowel each tier and transport seperatly and assemble on site...I'm too chicken to try it any other way! icon_rolleyes.gif

indydebi Posted 19 Aug 2008 , 12:05am
post #6 of 13

If you transport unassembled and then assemble it there, you don't need the long dowel down the center. That's to hold it together during transport. Once it's assembled and not moving, a center dowel isn't needed.

jibbies Posted 19 Aug 2008 , 12:05am
post #7 of 13

I dowel each tier, transport separately and assemble on site

Jibbies

GenGen Posted 19 Aug 2008 , 12:09am
post #8 of 13

i've seen this mentioned a few times but haven'd had a chance to check it out yet- does anyone have the link handy for the Stress free support system? i'm curious and tentative about how much it costs lol (yep i'm quite certain its worth it after reading the posts, honest)

Shelly4481 Posted 19 Aug 2008 , 1:17am
post #9 of 13

You can see it at earlenescakes.com. The basic set is $130.00 includes the disc and legs to do a 6 tier. Can buy additionaly legs. I have the 3 1/2" for basic cakes and the 5 1/2" to do the cakes slightly elevated to put flowers under. Love it!!!

BlakesCakes Posted 19 Aug 2008 , 5:26am
post #10 of 13
Quote:
Originally Posted by knel

I am doing a 6, 8, and 10 inch stacked cake. I will be traveling about an hour with it. If I use just the dowel rods (4 in each layer), cake board circles, and long dowel rod down through all three cakes, will this provide enough support? This is all I ever use for my 2 tier.

Thanks!




I traveled over some bumpy roads, about 10 miles, with this configuration. It was fondant covered, well doweled (including a long central dowel), and still I had some sinking of one edge of the middle tier (I could see it but the client couldn't). Fortunately, the cake stood just fine until it was cut.

Analyzing it now, I've come to a few conclusions:
This is a very pyramidal style cake. Each cake must be very, very well centered over the one below it (I think my middle tier may have been ever so slightly off center, causing a skew in the center of gravity of the the entire cake).

The cake should have been pushed more into the center of my van's cargo area--so that it wasn't behind or over the rear wheel axle (this is to cut down on the amount of direct vibration from bumpy roads).

I'd suggest using foamcore as your cake boards--much sturdier than cardboards) and also more dowels (rule of thumb, if using wooden dowels then one for each inch of the tier above--so, in this case, 8 in the 10" and 6 in the 8" OR if using plastic dowels, 4 in the 10" and 3 in the 8").

HTH
Rae

karensue Posted 19 Aug 2008 , 1:02pm
post #11 of 13

Here's the link to the stress-free support system ..
www.weddingcakesupports.com

saramachen Posted 19 Aug 2008 , 1:04pm
post #12 of 13

This morning i transported a 2 layer cake (the bottom layer was a dummy even) and i had issues moving it stacked. I am thinking now, that assembling it on site and moving the cake in cake boxes would have been better. For all those who transport stacked... How do you do it? How do you keep the cake from sliding around. I was being made fun of, cause i was driving so slow to keep the cake from moving... I really want to be able to transport stacked cakes.

leah_s Posted 19 Aug 2008 , 2:04pm
post #13 of 13

I use SPS (not SFS) and transport stacked all the time. There are a LOT of converts to SPS around CC now. It's easy, it's sturdy and its CHEAP!! For a four tier cake, it will cost less than $20 and you build the cost into the price of the cake. It's disposable, so no hassle of getting parts returned. You can transport whatever you can lift. (That's an important consideration.)

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