Paint For Cakes

Decorating By klassy1 Updated 17 Aug 2008 , 8:47pm by Briniga

klassy1 Posted 14 Aug 2008 , 8:26pm
post #1 of 15

Does any one know where I can find edible paint? I have the one for airbrush, But I need paint I can brush on. Thanks in advance for your help.

14 replies
ceshell Posted 15 Aug 2008 , 5:42am
post #2 of 15

You can use gel paste colors and mix them with high-% clear alcohol (e.g. strong vodka, everclear) or lemon extract (it's clear and has a high alcohol content). Paints right on. Needs to be alcohol because the liquid evaporates off rather quickly. Higher % alcohol=faster evaporation, less sogginess to whatever you're painting on.

LeanneW Posted 15 Aug 2008 , 5:55am
post #3 of 15

you can also use the airbrush paint with a paint brush and brush it on.

Briniga Posted 15 Aug 2008 , 6:04am
post #4 of 15

Thank you soooo much, one more question...I looked at that link & what does it mean when it says 1 part or 2 part...what does part mean?

ceshell Posted 15 Aug 2008 , 6:27am
post #5 of 15

LOL are you talking about the ganache thread I posted in? icon_razz.gif I just noticed that was you icon_smile.gif I'm gonna assume the answer is yes and I'll answer you over there thumbs_up.gif

Briniga Posted 15 Aug 2008 , 6:28am
post #6 of 15

Hahaha, opps sorry I had both windows open, haha

sweettoothmom Posted 15 Aug 2008 , 9:42pm
post #7 of 15

Luster dust and lemon juice or vodka can be painted on as well. Best of luck to you

Tashablueyes Posted 15 Aug 2008 , 10:15pm
post #8 of 15

I use gel colors and luster dust with vodka and I love how much it resembles regular old watercolors. YAY!

CakeDiva73 Posted 15 Aug 2008 , 10:56pm
post #9 of 15

I actually prefer to use airbrush colors since they are already in liquid form and are easier to blend, etc. I have a little one ounce dropper/bottle filled with vodka for diluting...........this is not to be confused with the one gallon bottle of vodka used for dealing with the kids until it's time for them to go back to school. icon_biggrin.gif

TexasSugar Posted 15 Aug 2008 , 11:15pm
post #10 of 15
Quote:
Originally Posted by CakeDiva73

I actually prefer to use since they are already in liquid form and are easier to blend, etc.




I agree. I used it on the skate board cake I did and the spots on my cow. It is already ready to go, no need to thin down.

Parable Posted 16 Aug 2008 , 5:24am
post #11 of 15
Quote:
Originally Posted by CakeDiva73

this is not to be confused with the one gallon bottle of vodka used for dealing with the kids until it's time for them to go back to school. icon_biggrin.gif




icon_lol.gificon_lol.gificon_lol.gificon_lol.gif

klassy1 Posted 16 Aug 2008 , 2:11pm
post #12 of 15

Thanks to the replys, This helped a lot. So did the Vodka part. Lol thumbs_up.gif

Briniga Posted 16 Aug 2008 , 6:01pm
post #13 of 15

Got a question...I just airbrushed a cake on the icing, no fondant, it looks terrible!! Am I not supposed to do it on icing or am I doing it wrong?

sweettoothmom Posted 17 Aug 2008 , 8:08pm
post #14 of 15

Describe what it did to the cake. Maybe if we see of here what it did we can help you decorate around it. That is my favorite part of cakes you can always cover a mistake. I have used both BC and Fondant. I am particular to fondant because it is smooth and my BC icing skills are still something I need to work on. icon_redface.gif

A tip- Any flaw in the icing or fondant show up when you airbrush or so I have found. But you can use this to your advantage too. You can create deptha nd dimension by purposly applying indentions and designs so that they show when you do airbrush. Lemons to lemonade so to speak.

Briniga Posted 17 Aug 2008 , 8:47pm
post #15 of 15

The whole thing looks horrible, its cracked & got spray spots everywhere...

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