Half And Half Cake

Decorating By HeatherBecker Updated 15 Aug 2008 , 8:20pm by jennifer7777

HeatherBecker Posted 13 Aug 2008 , 4:16pm
post #1 of 23

Several people have asked for a cake that is half chocolate and half white. I have done it in the past but I always struggle with how to keep the cake batter in one half of the pan while I put the other flavor in the other half. Does anyone have a suggestion on how to make this easier?

22 replies
marybible Posted 13 Aug 2008 , 4:22pm
post #2 of 23

what I do is if you have someone nearby, ask them to hold one end of the pan up just a little while you pour the batter in and keep holding it until you add the other batter then put it back level and then the batters will meet but they won't mix. am I making any sense?? LOL. I have also made a "divider" to put down the middle of the pan and then pour the batter into each side.

marybible Posted 13 Aug 2008 , 4:24pm
post #3 of 23

sorry, i forgot to say if you use a divider, after you put your batter in both sides then pull the divider out. but you probably already knew that...LOL

malishka Posted 13 Aug 2008 , 4:36pm
post #4 of 23

o.k., am i not understanding this correctly?
i bake one cake in vanilla and another same size cake in chocolate. Then when they are done, you put them together (one on top of the other) with icing or filling in between.
wouldn't that make it half chocolate & half white?

Diesel Posted 13 Aug 2008 , 4:38pm
post #5 of 23

When I have done half & half cakes I actually just bake each cake in it's own pan, then I cut that cake in half and stack on top of each other with a filling in between. I then just push the 2 halfs together and ice. I have never had a problem doing it this way and it saved me the stress of putting to different mixes in the same pan.

lynda-bob Posted 13 Aug 2008 , 4:43pm
post #6 of 23

I bake half and halfs all the time. With the batter I use (the doctored cake mix + sour cream + instant pudding mix) the batter doesn't really move fast enough to give me problems. I start to pour one side in, and stop about half way through, then I start pouring into the other side about half the batter, then go back to the original bowl/side of cake and finish up. I even have people ask for three different flavors and I'll do it if I'm making the 12 x 18 pan that calls for three boxes anyway. HTH icon_smile.gif

jennifer7777 Posted 13 Aug 2008 , 4:45pm
post #7 of 23
Quote:
Originally Posted by malishka

o.k., am i not understanding this correctly?
i bake one cake in vanilla and another same size cake in chocolate. Then when they are done, you put them together (one on top of the other) with icing or filling in between.
wouldn't that make it half chocolate & half white?




Yes, that would make it 1/2 & 1/2...but the OP is trying to get both flavors in ONE pan.

HeatherBecker...I have a picture tutorial that was graciously forwarded to me by Cakery from here. PM me your email and I will forward it to you...same goes for anyone else that wants it. The tutorial shows how to do this in one pan all by yourself!

jscakes Posted 13 Aug 2008 , 4:50pm
post #8 of 23

this works for me: I have 2 bowls of batter, one in each hand held comfortably and ready to pour. Starting in the middle of the pan, pour from each bowl at the same time and the batter meets up nicely in the center then continue until you have enough batter in each side. Sounds odd but that's how I learned how to do it.

marybible Posted 13 Aug 2008 , 5:07pm
post #9 of 23

when I first started doing half and half cakes I would use two separate pans, until they would come out different "hights" and wouldn't be even. So from then on, I bake the two in the same pan.

Lady_Phoenix Posted 13 Aug 2008 , 5:09pm
post #10 of 23

To make a cake like that,I pour my batters in at the same time, one at each end. They meet in the middle, and they do not mix. My grandsons cake was chocolate fudge on one end, strawberry on the other and marbled both flavors in the middle.

serenelui Posted 13 Aug 2008 , 5:14pm
post #11 of 23

Hi jennifer7777.. could you pm me the method as well icon_smile.gif

This may sound stupid but could i also ask as well whether it matters if the 2 recipes for the white and chocolate cakes are different... as in totally different recipes as compared to using a standard sponge cake recipe and just changing a portion of the flour in the recipe for cocoa powder for example... (am i making sense?)
Thought that different recipes may cause the cakes to rise differently.. so if that is the case will doing 1/2 and 1/2 cakes cause the cake to be lopsided if the 2 recipes rise at different rates? :p

HeatherBecker Posted 13 Aug 2008 , 5:50pm
post #12 of 23

Thanks for all your help. I hope this next cake is a bit easier.

serenelui....If the cakes do rise up differently, all you have to do is level them off. Then, it shouldn't be an issue.

serenelui Posted 14 Aug 2008 , 4:13am
post #13 of 23

Hi HeatherBecker... yup thats true... my brain must be off for me not to have thought of that :p

Loucinda Posted 14 Aug 2008 , 1:45pm
post #14 of 23

I make 1/2 and 1/2 cakes all the time, I just "prop" up one end of the pan with a few layers of dishtowels under the pan, pour one flavor in, take the dishtowels out from under the pan, pour the 2nd flavor in...tadaaaa!! Never had a problem.

hummingbird59 Posted 14 Aug 2008 , 2:01pm
post #15 of 23

Glad I read this post. I have always baked 2 seperate cake then pushed them together. I may still do this when both flavors are to be torted and filled with different filings. Any other suggestions for filing a 2 flavor cake.

jibbies Posted 14 Aug 2008 , 2:02pm
post #16 of 23
Quote:
Originally Posted by Loucinda

I make 1/2 and 1/2 cakes all the time, I just "prop" up one end of the pan with a few layers of dishtowels under the pan, pour one flavor in, take the dishtowels out from under the pan, pour the 2nd flavor in...tadaaaa!! Never had a problem.




For years I made the divider, then one day I thought why am I doing this so I did what Loucinda did , it worked! and I've not looked back thumbs_up.gif
These are really a big hit here in my area especially for kids parties. I just delivered one that was half chocolate fudge and half coconut, baked in an 11x15 pan. (it was for a 75 year old)

Jibbies

bobwonderbuns Posted 14 Aug 2008 , 2:09pm
post #17 of 23

Has anyone used the dividers they have for this purpose?

jennifer7777 Posted 14 Aug 2008 , 7:23pm
post #18 of 23
Quote:
Originally Posted by Loucinda

I make 1/2 and 1/2 cakes all the time, I just "prop" up one end of the pan with a few layers of dishtowels under the pan, pour one flavor in, take the dishtowels out from under the pan, pour the 2nd flavor in...tadaaaa!! Never had a problem.




This is basically what it shows in the picture tutorial that I sent to people. The tutorial was sent to me by Cakery from here. (Love her, her cakes and her helpfulness!) I will still send the tutorial for those interested, as sometimes it just helps to see something being done.

Man, I want to bake a 1/2 & 1/2 cake now!

What about this guys...Neapolitan...choc. and strawberry on the outside, with vanilla batter in the middle?! Sounds yummy! I've done Neapolitan layered cakes before, but not in one pan. Yet another thing to try!

lynda-bob Posted 14 Aug 2008 , 7:41pm
post #19 of 23

Jennifer7777 wrote:

Quote:
Quote:

What about this guys...Neapolitan...choc. and strawberry on the outside, with vanilla batter in the middle?! Sounds yummy! I've done Neapolitan layered cakes before, but not in one pan. Yet another thing to try!




I've done neapolitan before icon_smile.gif . I always tell people they have that option, but I've also had someone ask for chocolate, french vanilla, and yellow. Ooo oooh and one time I made chocolate, coconut, and mango frosted in coconut rum buttercream! icon_razz.gif Durlicious

Lynda

KieslerKakes Posted 14 Aug 2008 , 7:44pm
post #20 of 23

I use a spoon under one side of the pan and poor the vanilla or white cake mix first in the lower end of the pan. Then poor the chocolate in the higher end until it starts to roll to the middle of the pan and then remove the spoon. It's easy I do it all the time.

fiddlesticks Posted 14 Aug 2008 , 7:45pm
post #21 of 23

I just took a 1/2 choc 1/2 white out of the oven !I did the Indydebi trick! I put a small saucer under one end of the pan and added my white batter then took the saucer away and added my choc batter ! Thanks again Debbie It worked like a charm!

teacherandbaker Posted 14 Aug 2008 , 7:47pm
post #22 of 23

I use a cake board that I cut to fit in the pan. I wrap it with foil and hold it in the middle. I pour my white mix usually because it is thicker and won't run past the sides if I don't cut it exact. I then just grab the chocolate and pour it on the other side. This is at least one way you can do it if you don't have anyone to help you.

jennifer7777 Posted 15 Aug 2008 , 8:20pm
post #23 of 23
Quote:
Originally Posted by lynda-bob

I made chocolate, coconut, and mango frosted in coconut rum buttercream! icon_razz.gif Durlicious
Lynda




THIS sounds so yummy! Whoo, my "cakes to try list" just keeps getting bigger!

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