Moistening Syrup And Lorann

Decorating By staceyboots Updated 14 Aug 2008 , 7:47pm by staceyboots

staceyboots Posted 13 Aug 2008 , 3:54pm
post #1 of 18

Hi Guys

I made a chocolate cake over the weekend and moistened it with a raspberry liqueur which really improved the taste and texture of the cake. Because of this, I am seriously considering using some kind of moistening syrup for all of my cakes.

I would really prefer to use the gourmet syrups (like Monin) but unfortunately I wouldn't be able to get all of the flavours that I need on a regular basis. Has anyone tried making a moistening syrup using the Lorann flavours? If so, did it taste good or did it taste artificial?

TIA

Stacey

17 replies
disp4so Posted 13 Aug 2008 , 4:12pm
post #2 of 18

Hi,

I have not tried Lorann, I just usually use a good almond, vanilla, or grand mariner, or other good flavored liquor. I also use the syrup on all my cakes..
I always get compliments on how moist and flavorful they are..

good luck ..
Sherri

wildflower Posted 13 Aug 2008 , 4:18pm
post #3 of 18

hii guys
ive never used syrup on my cakes but have been meaning to try it and i was wondering do u buy the stuff or make it and if u make it then how do u make it?
srrry i didnt mean to hijack ur thread if i did,i was jus curious since it was being discussed
thnx!

ladycake17 Posted 13 Aug 2008 , 4:21pm
post #4 of 18

Do you use the moistening syrup on cakes covered with fondant? I would be afraid it would make them crumble under the weight of the fondant.

staceyboots Posted 13 Aug 2008 , 4:54pm
post #5 of 18
Quote:
Originally Posted by disp4so

Hi,

I have not tried Lorann, I just usually use a good almond, vanilla, or grand mariner, or other good flavored liquor. I also use the syrup on all my cakes..
I always get compliments on how moist and flavorful they are..

good luck ..
Sherri





I typically use the liqueurs to make my moistening syrups but am afraid to use them on my cakes for children.

cakeladyem Posted 13 Aug 2008 , 4:57pm
post #6 of 18

The cakes will still hold up fine under fondant. Just apply the syrup lightly. You want enough that it will soak in and add moisture but not make the cake sopping wet. Just use a silicone pastry brush and brush the syrup over the top of the cake, or I use one of the wilton candy melt squeeze bottles and just make concentric circles with it over the cake, it works fine and is a little faster. I have heard of people putting it in spray bottles and using like that too, I haven't tried it though.
To make the syrup you use equal parts sugar and water, usually 1/2 cup to 1 cup is enough for me. Stir them together in a sauce pan and bring to a boil, make sure all sugar is dissolved. Remove from heat and let it cool to about room temp, add any extracts or flavorings you want to it and you are good to go. icon_biggrin.gif

PinkZiab Posted 13 Aug 2008 , 5:08pm
post #7 of 18
Quote:
Quote:


I typically use the liqueurs to make my moistening syrups but am afraid to use them on my cakes for children.




You're using a few tablespoons of liqueur to flavor the syrup, not soaking the cake with 2 cups of booze. Using liqueur to flavor your soaking syrup is no different, really, than using vanilla extract to flavor it, as that is made with alcohol as well.

staceyboots Posted 13 Aug 2008 , 6:22pm
post #8 of 18
Quote:
Originally Posted by PinkZiab

Quote:
Quote:


I typically use the liqueurs to make my moistening syrups but am afraid to use them on my cakes for children.



You're using a few tablespoons of liqueur to flavor the syrup, not soaking the cake with 2 cups of booze. Using liqueur to flavor your soaking syrup is no different, really, than using vanilla extract to flavor it, as that is made with alcohol as well.





that's true! i should then try to add the liqueurs to the sugar syrup instead of pouring the liqueurs directly onto the cake.

staceyboots Posted 13 Aug 2008 , 6:24pm
post #9 of 18
Quote:
Originally Posted by wildflower

hii guys
ive never used syrup on my cakes but have been meaning to try it and i was wondering do u buy the stuff or make it and if u make it then how do u make it?
srrry i didnt mean to hijack ur thread if i did,i was jus curious since it was being discussed
thnx!





here's a recipe for Simple Syrup

http://www.recipezaar.com/26987

disp4so Posted 13 Aug 2008 , 6:56pm
post #10 of 18
Quote:
Originally Posted by ladycake17

Do you use the moistening syrup on cakes covered with fondant? I would be afraid it would make them crumble under the weight of the fondant.




I use it all the time on fondant covered cakes.. ..and I use boxed cake mixes.. so far so good.. (knock on wood!)

snowshoe1 Posted 13 Aug 2008 , 7:00pm
post #11 of 18
Quote:
Originally Posted by staceyboots

Hi Guys, Has anyone tried making a moistening syrup using the Lorann flavours? If so, did it taste good or did it taste artificial?

Stacey




Using the Lorann flavors works very nicely in syrups. Used the banana flavoring the other day and it added a very subtle taste to a white cake. Just added it as I would a vanilla or almond extract.

staceyboots Posted 13 Aug 2008 , 7:27pm
post #12 of 18

[quote="snowshoe1]Using the Lorann flavors works very nicely in syrups. Used the banana flavoring the other day and it added a very subtle taste to a white cake. Just added it as I would a vanilla or almond extract.[/quote]

GREAT!!

Franluvsfrosting Posted 13 Aug 2008 , 10:40pm
post #13 of 18

I use moistening syrups on all my cakes but I'm rather lazy. icon_smile.gif I just buy DaVinci's (or some other brand) coffee syrups. They're inexpensive at our Cash n' Carry and they have no alcohol so I don't have to worry about that (but they taste just as good as the real thing).

My dh jokes that we need a wine rack for all the bottles though. icon_biggrin.gif

staceyboots Posted 14 Aug 2008 , 2:25am
post #14 of 18
Quote:
Originally Posted by Franluvsfrosting

I use moistening syrups on all my cakes but I'm rather lazy. icon_smile.gif I just buy DaVinci's (or some other brand) coffee syrups. They're inexpensive at our Cash n' Carry and they have no alcohol so I don't have to worry about that (but they taste just as good as the real thing).

My dh jokes that we need a wine rack for all the bottles though. icon_biggrin.gif





Yeah...I would rather use the gourmet syrups too but I don't want to risk relying on a local supplier to have the flavours in stock when I need them. I will just buy the flavours that I can get steadily and make the flavoured syrups for the others when I have to.

sillywabbitz Posted 14 Aug 2008 , 6:56pm
post #15 of 18

I hate to sound dumb, but at what stage do you apply the syrup? Is it when you're stacking?

Let's say I bake my cake on Thurs and wrap it to stack and decorate on Friday. Do I put the syrup on it before I wrap them up for the night or do I use it when I'm putting them together?

I would love to start trying this to add flavor to WASC and chocolate cakes that would coordinate with the buttercream flavor or fillings.


Thanks

solascakes Posted 14 Aug 2008 , 7:38pm
post #16 of 18

Hello all, please if i'm moistening my cake with syrup and covering with fondant , does the syrup replace buttercream or do still put the buttercream after the syrup and before the fondant.Thank you.

staceyboots Posted 14 Aug 2008 , 7:42pm
post #17 of 18

i usually add my moistening syrups when i am actually stacking the cakes.

i soak my chocolate cake with Chambord (a raspberry liqueur) if i am making a chocolate raspberry cake. godiva liqueurs are also very good for chocolate cakes.

i have never soaked a WASC before but i bet that limoncello will be delicious. also, de kuyper manufactures a vanilla schnapps and almond liqueur.

http://www.samswine.com/dekuyper-creme-almond-liqueur-proof-p-10003012.html

http://www.samswine.com/dekuyper-vanilla-schnapps-proof-p-93799.html

staceyboots Posted 14 Aug 2008 , 7:47pm
post #18 of 18
Quote:
Originally Posted by solascakes

Hello all, please if i'm moistening my cake with syrup and covering with fondant , does the syrup replace buttercream or do still put the buttercream after the syrup and before the fondant.Thank you.




solas,

you will still put the buttercream after the syrup and before the fondant.

for example, a 2-layer cake would be assembled in the following manner:

cake...soak...buttercream...cake...soak...crumbcoat...fondant

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