Customer Complained Cake Was Too Moist ?????

Decorating By twistedsplinters Updated 12 Aug 2008 , 3:57pm by TOMAY

twistedsplinters Posted 12 Aug 2008 , 2:03pm
post #1 of 12

This is the 1st time I have ever had this happen or heard of this happening.

I made a two layer sheetcake this past weekend, and Just got a message from the woman saying that her son loved the smash cake but some ppl at teh party complained that the cake was too moist like maybe it wasnt finsihed cooking " in some of it" and made them feel sick... I add a cake extender to all my cakes and have never had anyone tell me this. I always test the cakes with the toothpick before taking them out and there was nothing on it. She was very nice about it and finished the message off saying that everyone thought it was beautiful and just thought I would want to know.

How should I handle this?

11 replies
cakedout Posted 12 Aug 2008 , 2:39pm
post #2 of 12

icon_confused.gif Gee, that's one for your books.

If you think you want to compensate her somehow, offer her a discount the next time she orders a cake....and make doubly sure that the cake is baked thru for her! icon_biggrin.gif

twistedsplinters Posted 12 Aug 2008 , 2:59pm
post #3 of 12

I sent her a reply earlier to her email and offered her a discount. . Just waiting to hear from her..

cakequeen50 Posted 12 Aug 2008 , 3:08pm
post #4 of 12

the way she wrote the email, it sounds like she just wants to make sure you know about it. Offering her a discount is a nice thing but you should really acknowledge her "constructive criticism" by letting her know you appreciate what she had to say and you will be watchful that it doesn't happen again. She obviously liked your cake but wants to make sure that next time she orders, it will be right.

onceuponacake Posted 12 Aug 2008 , 3:11pm
post #5 of 12

I did a cake for someone and she told my friend (who catered the party) that it was good but it was too moist..it wasnt like the publix cake they liked. uh......okay..this same person wanted me to use canned icing and i told her..no way.

i prefer moist cake, but i know there are some who prefer a cake that is a little dryer..i think its just preference

jmt1714 Posted 12 Aug 2008 , 3:14pm
post #6 of 12

ok - stop the insanity. A cake that is underbaked and a cake that is moist are two entirely different things. an underbaked cake is gooey, not MOIST. and you certainly would have noticed it when you leveled and/torted I am sure.

I wouldn't have automatically have offered a discount. your cakes are moist, and that's what they are like. end of story.

twistedsplinters Posted 12 Aug 2008 , 3:17pm
post #7 of 12

yeah I agree, I took it as constructive criticism, she was very polite in how she told me also so, I felt like I should offer her something icon_smile.gif

doughdough Posted 12 Aug 2008 , 3:25pm
post #8 of 12

Everyone is different...some like moist cake, others prefer dry. My hunch is that these particular customers are used to a dryer cake (with canned icing).

My advice would be to leave any future cakes for them in the oven a couple extra minutes, just for insurance.

melvin01 Posted 12 Aug 2008 , 3:30pm
post #9 of 12

Ha ha, instead of offering her a discount, I'd offer her a DRY CAKE!!

I agree, there is a difference between not baked and moist.

mcelromi1 Posted 12 Aug 2008 , 3:36pm
post #10 of 12
Quote:
Originally Posted by jmt1714

ok - stop the insanity. A cake that is underbaked and a cake that is moist are two entirely different things. an underbaked cake is gooey, not MOIST. and you certainly would have noticed it when you leveled and/torted I am sure.

I wouldn't have automatically have offered a discount. your cakes are moist, and that's what they are like. end of story.




A cake that is undercooked can also become packy in the middle once its cooled, and therefore will not be gooey. She never said it was 'raw'.
Moist is probably just the term she used, being unable to think of another way to describe it.
And the poster never stated that the cake was torted. She said that it was 2 layers, possibly one sheet on top of another sheet with buttercream in between.

The customer, being unsure of what the issue was, was just informing her of the comments made by her guest. It's called feedback.
If there was a possible problem with one of my cakes, I know that I would surely like to know so that I could prevent making the same mistake again.

tonedna Posted 12 Aug 2008 , 3:45pm
post #11 of 12

They are so used to dry cake they can't tell when they are eating a good one!.. I would offer a 10% discount of the next purchase..
Edna icon_biggrin.gif

TOMAY Posted 12 Aug 2008 , 3:57pm
post #12 of 12

Here in the south we bake pound cakes with what is called the Happy Ring which is the moist section of a well baked cake . Raw cake does not equal a dry toothpick so I think you were fine the packed most section may have been looked at as raw .

Quote by @%username% on %date%

%body%