Help!!!!urgent

Decorating By Bradymom6 Updated 8 Aug 2008 , 9:30pm by kathys90

Bradymom6 Posted 8 Aug 2008 , 6:52am
post #1 of 20

I need help quick. It is almost two in the morning here and I am having the worst time. I have a cake order for Saturday. It calls for a full sheet 1/2 strawberry and 1/2 white. I made the cakes, 1/2 sheet strawberry and 1/2 white. Both cakes sunk in the middle. I have never had this happen to me before. Ideas or suggestions? I need to get these cakes done so I guess I am going to have to bake and decorate tomorrow. Any help is needed badly.
TIA,
Bradymom

19 replies
Toptier Posted 8 Aug 2008 , 7:22am
post #2 of 20

Well, I'm up so I'll see if I can help. I just pulled out my copy of The Cake Bible for an explanation. If this is a scratch cake I would try reducing the amount of baking powder by 30% for such a large cake (if the original formula was for an 8" and you are scaling up). Essentially the larger the surface area the weaker the cake structure is and there is a higher potential to fall. Baking powder weakens the structure since it expands air space so decreasing the amt of powder actually strengthens the cake without negative effect in a largecake.

You say this never happened to you before with this recipe? Have you baked this size cake before with this particular recipe? Perhaps your baking powder is old? Just throwing out some thoughts here, not sure what has happened this particular time.

I'd also throw some greased/floured flower nails in towards the middle of the cake to help, or a baking core.

If it's a mix you're making I'm afraid that I'm at a loss - I thought those were infallible. I suppose you could bake 1/4 sheets and put those together if you're worried about rebaking the 1/2 sheets.

All the best, tomorrow's another day, things will look better in the morning icon_smile.gif .

Bakingangel Posted 8 Aug 2008 , 7:23am
post #3 of 20

What about trimming the cake to the height it is in the middle? Assuming it is fully cooked and didn't fall totally flat. Then put extra icing on the top to regain some height.

This happened to me when I set the cake on the countertop and didn't pay attention to the a/c when it came on it was blowing down on it. I think the clash in temperature was the problem for me.

Good luck!

KoryAK Posted 8 Aug 2008 , 7:43am
post #4 of 20

I'm guessing that if the middle sunk bad enough to distress her, then cutting it down to that level is going to be waaay too short. I think you need to rebake and maybe leave it in a tad longer if you don't think its the recipe (again: scratch or mix?) and if it happens again (and is cooked thru) then trim today's and tomorrow's down as the PP said and stack them both together.

Bradymom6 Posted 8 Aug 2008 , 11:31am
post #5 of 20

Thanks for your suggestions. I am using cake mixes. I think I am just going to try to rebake them when I get home from work today. I will let you know how it goes.

foxymomma521 Posted 8 Aug 2008 , 12:01pm
post #6 of 20

A bunch of people have said DH mixes are doing this to them. Is that what you used? If so try BC or Pillsbury next time icon_smile.gif

lchristi27 Posted 8 Aug 2008 , 12:10pm
post #7 of 20

My DH's have been doing that too. I need to branch out here.

One other thought, but a metal flower nail (sprayed with pam or something) in the center of the cake pan before baking!

Molly2 Posted 8 Aug 2008 , 12:22pm
post #8 of 20

When that happened to me it was because I over beat my cake mix I was using my Kitchen aide, when i used my hand mixer it didn't do it

Molly

Bradymom6 Posted 8 Aug 2008 , 1:07pm
post #9 of 20

I do use Duncan Hines, but I have never had any problems. As a matter of fact I just made a cake a last week and it was fine. It is very possible that I over mixed them. I think I will by another brand on the way home just in case. I did use flower nails but maybe I used to many. I put two in at each end of the pan. Could that have done it?
Thanks

maam1993 Posted 8 Aug 2008 , 6:59pm
post #10 of 20

I don't have an answer of than the suggestions given.

What are flour nails? I have never heard of them.

I'm just learning all the unexpecteds that can happen when baking cakes for other people. I was baking a cake yesterday for delivery on Saturday and the directions said to fill pans a little fuller than usual. Well, instead of me using my common sense, I followed directions and the cake batter flowed over both pans and into the oven... which gave me an opportunity to clean my oven . . . and make the cake again.

Good Luck tonight.

Maam1993

Lady_Phoenix Posted 8 Aug 2008 , 7:17pm
post #11 of 20

I have head a lot of people are having issues with DH cakes falling. If its not the mix you may be overmixing as you suspect. A flower nail is used to make roses and other flowers on. I place one in the center of my half sheet pan to ensure even baking. Also bake even strips are a great help in getting an ever rise.

kathys90 Posted 8 Aug 2008 , 7:22pm
post #12 of 20
Quote:
Originally Posted by maam1993

I
What are flour nails? I have never heard of them.




A flower nail is what you use to make roses with frosting. You can find them on the wilton site.

I use DH all the time, its my favorite....the most moist! Never had your problem of sinking though. Good luck! make sure to post a photo!
kathy

DEBBIE157 Posted 8 Aug 2008 , 7:34pm
post #13 of 20

Shouldn't the flower nails go more in the center of the cake, rather than at the edges? I thought the purpose was to conduct more heat to the center (since the sides of the pan are metal and will have more heat than the middle)

Debbie

DEBBIE157 Posted 8 Aug 2008 , 7:34pm
post #14 of 20

sorry I guess I hit enter too many times.

DEBBIE157 Posted 8 Aug 2008 , 7:34pm
post #15 of 20

please forgive the double post

DEBBIE157 Posted 8 Aug 2008 , 7:34pm
post #16 of 20

Shouldn't the flower nails go more in the center of the cake, rather than at the edges? I thought the purpose was to conduct more heat to the center (since the sides are metal and will have more heat than the middle)

Debbie

DEBBIE157 Posted 8 Aug 2008 , 7:36pm
post #17 of 20

please forgive double double post!

RRGibson Posted 8 Aug 2008 , 7:37pm
post #18 of 20

For large cakes, I've learned that the best thing to do is to start off cooking them on a lower temperature than normal. Until it levels out and rises uniformly and then turn the oven up to the regular temp that you would bake at. Works for me. You get a flatter cake that way as well, less to level or throw away.

kathys90 Posted 8 Aug 2008 , 9:30pm
post #19 of 20
Quote:
Originally Posted by DEBBIE157

Shouldn't the flower nails go more in the center of the cake, rather than at the edges? I thought the purpose was to conduct more heat to the center (since the sides of the pan are metal and will have more heat than the middle)

Debbie




I always put them in the middle, never tried putting it at the sides.

kathys90 Posted 8 Aug 2008 , 9:30pm
post #20 of 20
Quote:
Originally Posted by DEBBIE157

Shouldn't the flower nails go more in the center of the cake, rather than at the edges? I thought the purpose was to conduct more heat to the center (since the sides of the pan are metal and will have more heat than the middle)

Debbie




I always put them in the middle, never tried putting it at the sides.

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