Wilton's Cake Decorating Courses (Methond Classes)

Decorating By blueberrycheesecake Updated 22 Mar 2009 , 3:56am by Cakepro

blueberrycheesecake Posted 7 Aug 2008 , 4:15am
post #1 of 30

I have a link here : http://www.wilton.com/classes/local_classes.cfm

I am planning to take Wilton's Cake Decorating Courses, and since I have to travel to another region, I need some information about it.

How long does each course take?
Was it worth it?
Did you learn a lot out of the classes?

Well, they are the only questions I can think of, but if there is anything else I need to know, don't hesitate to tell. hehhee.. !

Thanks! hope you could help me out!

icon_lol.gif

29 replies
Monna7122 Posted 7 Aug 2008 , 4:34am
post #2 of 30

I have not taken the classes but have just recently researched them myself. Here is what I found out.

It is $35 a course. There are 3 courses then a Fondant and Gumpaste course. I was told each course is a 2 hour class once a week for a month. Depending on your location depends on the time and day of the course. I do not think you can jump in half way through the course and that they start over each month.

According to what I have read on this site, it is 50/50 on whether or not it is worth it. Some say yes, some say no. A lot of people, including myself, are purchasing the DVD's from Sugar Shack. Everyone is raving on these. She has great recipes and does excellent work. This is the website I have for them...

http://www.sugaredproductions.com/

HTH icon_biggrin.gif

Lorendabug Posted 7 Aug 2008 , 4:43am
post #3 of 30

The classes can be very helpful since you have an instructor there to assist you if you are having difficulties with a technique.

I don't know what your skill level is so it would be difficult to say if you will get what you are looking for out of the classes.

The Wilton courses gave me the confidence to want to keep learning new things. That is where this site took over. I have learned a lot from here. But would not have gone on if I didn't get the basic knowledge from the classes.

Good luck with whatever you decide to do! icon_smile.gif

Lynnzee Posted 7 Aug 2008 , 4:44am
post #4 of 30

The nice thing about these classes are the students and teacher's. It is very similair to this site because everyone loves sugar art and wants to learn more. If you already have basic skills then you need not go to class 1 unless you are one to start things from the beginning icon_smile.gif. I took the first course and it was nice because it gave me an excuse to make and decorate cakes. Other than that I already was familiar with all of the things we "learned". If you have to travel far remember how much you are having to spend in gas and decide if it is worth it. The video's are a nice option. I am not sure if you are involved in a local cake organazation at all, but for example ICES does days of sharing, and you can learn a great deal from those. icon_biggrin.gif Good luck and let us know what you thought.

saramachen Posted 7 Aug 2008 , 2:02pm
post #5 of 30

I am taking the Fondont and Gumpaste course right now, had my first of the 4 classes last night. I have completed course 1 and 2. I feel they are very worth it. The course itself might only be $35 dollars, but i spent about $100 in supplies... mind you if you have a lot of stuff than you don't need to worry about this. Also for course one you need to bring in a baked, crumb coated cake for 3 of the 4 classes and a batch of b/c for each class. Course 2 you only do 1 cake, but will need a batch of RI for each class. You have to take course 1 as a prerequiste for any of the other courses, but you do not need to take them in order. The teacher you have will make or break the course. Mine is fantastic. I am a big fan of the courses, but im a newbie... not just to CC, but to cakes all together.

blueberrycheesecake Posted 8 Aug 2008 , 2:37am
post #6 of 30
Quote:
Originally Posted by Monna7122

I have not taken the classes but have just recently researched them myself. Here is what I found out.

It is $35 a course. There are 3 courses then a Fondant and Gumpaste course. I was told each course is a 2 hour class once a week for a month. Depending on your location depends on the time and day of the course. I do not think you can jump in half way through the course and that they start over each month.

According to what I have read on this site, it is 50/50 on whether or not it is worth it. Some say yes, some say no. A lot of people, including myself, are purchasing the DVD's from Sugar Shack. Everyone is raving on these. She has great recipes and does excellent work. This is the website I have for them...

http://www.sugaredproductions.com/

HTH icon_biggrin.gif




hey thanks! i'll go ahead and check it! =)

in one of those tapes, do they also teach how to make icing? and also what you need for the icing? icon_redface.gif

DaisyLisa17 Posted 8 Aug 2008 , 3:01am
post #7 of 30

I also love the classes. I tried to teach myself all the techniques, but I am such a visual learner so it helps to have someone right next to you showing you how to do something. The instructors offer so much, not only are they teaching Wilton, they share their own personal experiences which teach you on a whole different level. You do have to be prepared to spend the money though, especially if you dont have all the supplies already. Hobby Lobby is nice since they offer the 40% coupon every other week. I use those all the time on my cake stuff!

I just started course 3 and intend to finish through course 4. I would reccomend them to anyone!

blueberrycheesecake Posted 8 Aug 2008 , 3:05am
post #8 of 30
Quote:
Originally Posted by Lynnzee

The nice thing about these classes are the students and teacher's. It is very similair to this site because everyone loves sugar art and wants to learn more. If you already have basic skills then you need not go to class 1 unless you are one to start things from the beginning icon_smile.gif. I took the first course and it was nice because it gave me an excuse to make and decorate cakes. Other than that I already was familiar with all of the things we "learned". If you have to travel far remember how much you are having to spend in gas and decide if it is worth it. The video's are a nice option. I am not sure if you are involved in a local cake organazation at all, but for example ICES does days of sharing, and you can learn a great deal from those. icon_biggrin.gif Good luck and let us know what you thought.




unfortunately, i do not belong to any cake organizations at all. icon_redface.gif And yes, I am a beginner so I have a lot to learn. Also one of the reasons why I asked this question because I have to travel to get to the place and I need to file a Vacation Leave at work to be able to attend the classes.

blueberrycheesecake Posted 8 Aug 2008 , 3:10am
post #9 of 30
Quote:
Originally Posted by DaisyLisa17

I also love the classes. I tried to teach myself all the techniques, but I am such a visual learner so it helps to have someone right next to you showing you how to do something. The instructors offer so much, not only are they teaching Wilton, they share their own personal experiences which teach you on a whole different level. You do have to be prepared to spend the money though, especially if you dont have all the supplies already. Hobby Lobby is nice since they offer the 40% coupon every other week. I use those all the time on my cake stuff!

I just started course 3 and intend to finish through course 4. I would reccomend them to anyone!




Yes, I am a visual learner myself. I do a lot of readings but I'd rather have someone more knowledgeable and more experienced to teach me all the ropes.
So you studied Wilton's? I'm not sure if this is the right question, but do they also teach you how to make different types of icing (BC and FOndant)? icon_smile.gif

blueberrycheesecake Posted 8 Aug 2008 , 3:13am
post #10 of 30
Quote:
Originally Posted by saramachen

I am taking the Fondont and Gumpaste course right now, had my first of the 4 classes last night. I have completed course 1 and 2. I feel they are very worth it. The course itself might only be $35 dollars, but i spent about $100 in supplies... mind you if you have a lot of stuff than you don't need to worry about this. Also for course one you need to bring in a baked, crumb coated cake for 3 of the 4 classes and a batch of b/c for each class. Course 2 you only do 1 cake, but will need a batch of RI for each class. You have to take course 1 as a prerequiste for any of the other courses, but you do not need to take them in order. The teacher you have will make or break the course. Mine is fantastic. I am a big fan of the courses, but im a newbie... not just to CC, but to cakes all together.




wow! good for you.. and that means, saving a lot of money for myself.. i really need to plan this out and I thank GOd I posted this question. Thank you for the info you shared! =)

blueberrycheesecake Posted 8 Aug 2008 , 3:37am
post #11 of 30
Quote:
Originally Posted by Lorendabug

The classes can be very helpful since you have an instructor there to assist you if you are having difficulties with a technique.

I don't know what your skill level is so it would be difficult to say if you will get what you are looking for out of the classes.

The Wilton courses gave me the confidence to want to keep learning new things. That is where this site took over. I have learned a lot from here. But would not have gone on if I didn't get the basic knowledge from the classes.

Good luck with whatever you decide to do! icon_smile.gif




icon_biggrin.gif i am definitely a beginner who has no knowledge yet about cake decorating! icon_redface.gif

hummingbird59 Posted 8 Aug 2008 , 3:39am
post #12 of 30

How far do you have to travel? I traveled 45 miles one way, but I really enjoyed the classes. I took Course 1 and 2, but have not been able to take Course 3 (Hobby Lobby in my area doesn't have a teacher at this time.) I went ahead and bought Course 3 book. Once you get used to the format of their classes you can try new things on your own. CC has been a great help for the questions I have had since I am trying to learn things about fondant on my own. BTW some months the class was half price or with a discount of some kind. Find a friend to share the traveling expense. Have fun.

blueberrycheesecake Posted 11 Aug 2008 , 10:07pm
post #13 of 30
Quote:
Originally Posted by hummingbird59

How far do you have to travel? I traveled 45 miles one way, but I really enjoyed the classes. I took Course 1 and 2, but have not been able to take Course 3 (Hobby Lobby in my area doesn't have a teacher at this time.) I went ahead and bought Course 3 book. Once you get used to the format of their classes you can try new things on your own. CC has been a great help for the questions I have had since I am trying to learn things about fondant on my own. BTW some months the class was half price or with a discount of some kind. Find a friend to share the traveling expense. Have fun.




hi! i have to travel by plane. icon_smile.gif That's kinda expensive and I can't leave work for a long time. I still need the money that I get paid. he-he! There isn't enough work like my job who pays good. Especially now that I am trying to learn cake decorating classes, they're expensive I must say. But thank you for the advise! icon_smile.gif

PinkZiab Posted 12 Aug 2008 , 12:39am
post #14 of 30

I have not taken any wilton classes, but honestly as good as they are for some, I can't imagine they are worth taking leave from your job and the travel expenses you'll incur. Are there any bakeries where you live where you might be able to get a part time job or internship? Culinary schools that offer amateur courses? I would advise starting out with books and DVD's (you can even find some tutorials online) to get start before making that type of investment.

hummingbird59 Posted 12 Aug 2008 , 12:54am
post #15 of 30
Quote:
Originally Posted by PinkZiab

I have not taken any wilton classes, but honestly as good as they are for some, I can't imagine they are worth taking leave from your job and the travel expenses you'll incur. Are there any bakeries where you live where you might be able to get a part time job or internship? Culinary schools that offer amateur courses? I would advise starting out with books and DVD's (you can even find some tutorials online) to get start before making that type of investment.


I agree with PinkZiab. I don't think I would leave a job to take the course when there is so much offered online. You can even take tutorials online that would be cheaper that the expense that it seems it would take for you to get to a course. What type of work do you do now? If I may ask. Do you plan on making a career out of cake baking? Mine is just a hobby at this tme, but who knows the future. Good luck!

xstitcher Posted 13 Aug 2008 , 1:02am
post #16 of 30

Hi blueberrycheesecake and welcome to CC!!!!

I love taking the Wilton classes. I've never decorated prior to taking these classes and as I am a visual learner they were the best choice for me. I don't know if I would travel by plane for these classes though as each class is a month long. You could possibly take more than one class in that month but if your staying in a hotel or something, where would you bake your cakes and make your icing to take to class?

If you are able to learn through reading and watching dvd's I'd try that route first. There are always some tutorials on youtube etc on line that you could try first and Sharon's DVD's are amazing!

But, if you would like to take classes and there are none available anywhere in your area that you could drive to how about trying Wilton's Master Course?

I just went on there website and they say that beginners can take it too. It is very expensive but if you have to take time off work, stay in a hotel do homework etc. this may be the better route to go. They say that everything is furnished for the classes so you would not have to buy anything else nor would you have any homework (or so I assume) plus it's done fulltime hours in 2 weeks. You could always contact Wilton for more info...

Just my 2 cents worth.

HTH!!!

icon_smile.gificon_smile.gif

raquel1 Posted 13 Aug 2008 , 1:26am
post #17 of 30

As much as I loved the Wilton classes I have to agree with xstitcher about maybe the Wilton Master class being a better choice for you. You would be spending a lot of money just with the travel...and I can't imagine trying to travel with all you need for the classes. I did all four and sometimes felt like a gypsy with cakes, icing, supplies, etc...JMHO

tonedna Posted 13 Aug 2008 , 1:39am
post #18 of 30

I started with the Wilton classes. I know a lot of people think they are too simple . But quite honeslty is the best way to get anybody started. I believe so much in them and the passion for cakes that created for me that i teach them now.. And I been doing it for a long time. Look at my cakes..see how far I have come..My only classes Wilton's....the rest..is from pure passion!
Edna icon_biggrin.gif

blueberrycheesecake Posted 17 Aug 2008 , 8:41pm
post #19 of 30
Quote:
Originally Posted by PinkZiab

I have not taken any wilton classes, but honestly as good as they are for some, I can't imagine they are worth taking leave from your job and the travel expenses you'll incur. Are there any bakeries where you live where you might be able to get a part time job or internship? Culinary schools that offer amateur courses? I would advise starting out with books and DVD's (you can even find some tutorials online) to get start before making that type of investment.




icon_smile.gif You definitely had me thinking! I found one online who can help me learn it. I think she is quite good. I took my first class yesterday. I haven't posted any pics yet because I feel embarrassed to do it. Everybody here seems to have good-looking cakes!

Thank you for the advise, PinkZiab.

icon_smile.gif

blueberrycheesecake Posted 17 Aug 2008 , 8:48pm
post #20 of 30
Quote:
Originally Posted by hummingbird59

Quote:
Originally Posted by PinkZiab

I have not taken any wilton classes, but honestly as good as they are for some, I can't imagine they are worth taking leave from your job and the travel expenses you'll incur. Are there any bakeries where you live where you might be able to get a part time job or internship? Culinary schools that offer amateur courses? I would advise starting out with books and DVD's (you can even find some tutorials online) to get start before making that type of investment.

I agree with PinkZiab. I don't think I would leave a job to take the course when there is so much offered online. You can even take tutorials online that would be cheaper that the expense that it seems it would take for you to get to a course. What type of work do you do now? If I may ask. Do you plan on making a career out of cake baking? Mine is just a hobby at this tme, but who knows the future. Good luck!




hello, hummingbird59! Yes, I do plan on making it as a career. Unfortunately, my dad did not agree on taking Culinary Arts when I was still in college. He didn't think it was a professional job. I totally disagree! icon_biggrin.gif I have definitely dreamed of becoming a pattieserie (I'm not sure if my spelling is correct). Now that I'm working full-time (I'm a tech support rep), I am trying to learn how to do cakes. I love cakes, he-he! It's so far out from the course that I took but this is really something I would love to do forever! icon_biggrin.gif

blueberrycheesecake Posted 17 Aug 2008 , 8:56pm
post #21 of 30
Quote:
Originally Posted by xstitcher

Hi blueberrycheesecake and welcome to CC!!!!

I love taking the Wilton classes. I've never decorated prior to taking these classes and as I am a visual learner they were the best choice for me. I don't know if I would travel by plane for these classes though as each class is a month long. You could possibly take more than one class in that month but if your staying in a hotel or something, where would you bake your cakes and make your icing to take to class?

If you are able to learn through reading and watching dvd's I'd try that route first. There are always some tutorials on youtube etc on line that you could try first and Sharon's DVD's are amazing!

But, if you would like to take classes and there are none available anywhere in your area that you could drive to how about trying Wilton's Master Course?

I just went on there website and they say that beginners can take it too. It is very expensive but if you have to take time off work, stay in a hotel do homework etc. this may be the better route to go. They say that everything is furnished for the classes so you would not have to buy anything else nor would you have any homework (or so I assume) plus it's done fulltime hours in 2 weeks. You could always contact Wilton for more info...

Just my 2 cents worth.

HTH!!!

icon_smile.gificon_smile.gif




icon_biggrin.gif I have definitely thought about this. he-he! You have the same advise with PinkZiab and I tried to look for someone locally to teach me. Found one who is willing to teach me (with payment for each session of course! icon_biggrin.gif ). She said that she planned to do it but when I suggested it to her, that was her GO signal. icon_biggrin.gif Good thing I asked he-he!

Soon, when I have enough money and time on my hands, I'll try Wilton's and just see what I can learn from them. For now, I will settle on Anne (she's my mentor) because I also believe in her skills to teach me the basics and what I need to know for cake decorating!
icon_biggrin.gif

blueberrycheesecake Posted 17 Aug 2008 , 9:00pm
post #22 of 30

Hey, guys! Thank you for all the tips and opinions you replied to my post. I want to apologize to those posts that I was not able to reply to but I am grateful you have taken the time to give me advises. icon_smile.gif

CC is really helpful to beginners like me because they have CC members who are willing to help out! icon_smile.gif

God bless and more power to all of you! icon_smile.gif

blueberrycheesecake Posted 17 Aug 2008 , 9:03pm
post #23 of 30
Quote:
Originally Posted by tonedna

I started with the Wilton classes. I know a lot of people think they are too simple . But quite honeslty is the best way to get anybody started. I believe so much in them and the passion for cakes that created for me that i teach them now.. And I been doing it for a long time. Look at my cakes..see how far I have come..My only classes Wilton's....the rest..is from pure passion!
Edna icon_biggrin.gif




hey! somebody suggested your video about royal icing. it was helpful to me! =)

tonedna Posted 17 Aug 2008 , 9:21pm
post #24 of 30
Quote:
Originally Posted by blueberrycheesecake

Quote:
Originally Posted by tonedna

I started with the Wilton classes. I know a lot of people think they are too simple . But quite honeslty is the best way to get anybody started. I believe so much in them and the passion for cakes that created for me that i teach them now.. And I been doing it for a long time. Look at my cakes..see how far I have come..My only classes Wilton's....the rest..is from pure passion!
Edna icon_biggrin.gif



hey! somebody suggested your video about royal icing. it was helpful to me! =)




Thanks, I hope it helped!
Edna thumbs_up.gif

playingwithsugar Posted 17 Aug 2008 , 9:39pm
post #25 of 30

If you plan to take the courses through a craft store, inquire as to whether they are offering a special on the price of the course or the kit.

I took my classes at Michael's the first time, and I paid for the first course, got the second course free. The third course was free when I bought the course kit. I bought all my kits with 50% off coupons, so, altogether, it cost me $55 for all three courses and kits. Of course, that was back in 2004.

Theresa

sweetideas Posted 17 Aug 2008 , 9:46pm
post #26 of 30

Wilton has some DVD's available...check out their website. Some community colleges have cake decorating available as a continuing education course. It sound like a one day deal but you learn it all in 4 hours. There's a LOT available on YouTube tutorials that are free and very helpful. Personally, if you have to travel by plane and take off from work, then, no, they wouldn't be worth it, I would absolutely check into a real college course or the Wilton master class in IL.

tracycakes Posted 17 Aug 2008 , 11:54pm
post #27 of 30

I learned so much in my first classes with Wilton. I took them in 1990 when I attempts at teaching myself weren't going so good. We didn't have as many books or tapes or internet then so it was really all I had. Over the past year, I've been teaching myself fondant and gumpaste. I recently took the Wilton Fond and gumpaste class (wasn't offered in 1990) just to see if there were any tips I could pick up. It was not expensive and it gave me a reason to practice and made me feel confident with the skills I have learned.

blueberrycheesecake Posted 21 Mar 2009 , 10:08pm
post #28 of 30

thanks everyone for the help! icon_smile.gif

xstitcher Posted 22 Mar 2009 , 12:14am
post #29 of 30

So did you end up taking any of the classes? I think your cakes look great btw! icon_biggrin.gif

Cakepro Posted 22 Mar 2009 , 3:56am
post #30 of 30
Quote:
Originally Posted by blueberrycheesecake

thanks everyone for the help! icon_smile.gif




LOL...[insert French-accent voice from Spongebob] Seven months later... icon_rolleyes.gif

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