Would You Even Respond? Cancelled Cake Order

Decorating By aligotmatt Updated 7 Aug 2008 , 2:00pm by aligotmatt

aligotmatt Posted 6 Aug 2008 , 8:45pm
post #1 of 14

I had a bride call me for an october 12th cake. It is such a busy weekend here, I'm already booked to do 6 cakes, so I told her I was not available. So she emailed me that night and said she would be as flexible as possible, I could do whatever I wanted, she would pay whatever she wanted as long as she could get a wedding cake not from a grocery store. So I thought about it, all of my cakes finished being delivered the 11th at 4pm, so I figured I COULD do a cake for the next day. So I said okay, we can make it work. She asked if we could meet for a tasting like 2 days later, I told her I wasn't available for a tasting then and that I am very busy the next few weeks, but I would be happy to discuss things through email. We emailed back and forth like 8 times each and I was working on some designs for her to send her. I sent her some designs and she wrote me back and said, "in the few days it took you to respond, I got nervous and decided to find another decorator, thanks anyway"

Do I need to reply to her? Can Ijsut leave it at that? I kind of want to say something, but nothing at the same time...

she is an out of town bride and said not a single one of her guests are from here, if that makes a difference.

13 replies
arosstx Posted 6 Aug 2008 , 8:50pm
post #2 of 14

As a courtesy, so she knows you got her email, you could respond w/ the standard, "best wishes for your wedding, and if I can help you in the future just let me know" kind of email and then be done with it.

tx_cupcake Posted 6 Aug 2008 , 8:53pm
post #3 of 14
Quote:
Originally Posted by arosstx

As a courtesy, so she knows you got her email, you could respond w/ the standard, "best wishes for your wedding, and if I can help you in the future just let me know" kind of email and then be done with it.




Agreed.

kurn Posted 6 Aug 2008 , 8:53pm
post #4 of 14

I would personally want to respond to her but I couldn't think of anything positive or remotely nice to say. tapedshut.gif I guess it's better to leave it alone.

dinas27 Posted 6 Aug 2008 , 8:55pm
post #5 of 14

I would acknowledge that you got the email, that way you both have a paper trail that the order is off the books.

Wish her well and catch up on your sleep after that weekend.

varika Posted 6 Aug 2008 , 8:57pm
post #6 of 14

At most, I'd send back an email saying, "OK, thanks for letting me know," and leave it at that. It'll be a lot less stress for you, too, so there's no need to even bother being upset or anything.

leah_s Posted 6 Aug 2008 , 8:59pm
post #7 of 14

Ditto. "Best wishes on your upcoming wedding."

playingwithsugar Posted 6 Aug 2008 , 8:59pm
post #8 of 14

I've got to chime in here.

I have read, all too often, about decorators who send designs via e-mail, or have consultations where the potential client walks out with a design or two, without booking a cake.

You all are wasting valuable time giving your designs away like this.

I think it is time for all of you to start charging for your tastings and consultations, with all or a portion of the price rebated after delivery. I would go further to say that all designs are your property, and the sketch or design will be provided along with the rebate upon delivery.

On a personal note to aligotmatt -

I realize that this is an out-of-town bride, so the circumstances are different. But if I already had that many cakes to do for local delivery, I would have just turned down that business, and let that be that.

JMHO -

Theresa icon_smile.gif

deliciously_decadent Posted 6 Aug 2008 , 9:23pm
post #9 of 14

such a sucker for squeezing in cakes so that someone doesn't 'miss out' and i only live to regret it like right now i have 5 cakes this week (3 of them tiered and two 3D sculptures) and I am wishing i had said no to something but always a reason, brides cake decorator cancelled and she was in tears, a friend of my grandmother, the father of a future wedding client etc etc etc but it honestly isn't worth it! in a way you could view it as ablessing in disguise now you have that day free to relax! I would just send a short but sweet email: dear....., I recieved your email today, thankyou for informing me of your decision to change decorators (bringing up her choice to jump ship will make her squirm slightly but you are not over stepping the mark then you finish it of sugar sickly sweet so that you don't loose any future business or get bad word of mouth publicity) I hope your day is perfect and when you need a cake in the future you think of me. Regards ................
I think this is sufficient. you make your point that it is an annoyance to be cancelled and still appear lovely and sweet wishing her all the best.
I wouls also for future reference get a booking deposit straight away on bookings like these, I require a $50 booking deposit that is non refundable which in the off chance of cancelation covers any tastings etc. I email designs all the time and find this very convenient as i operate in a holiday destination and deal with brides from all over the world.

milissasmom Posted 6 Aug 2008 , 9:26pm
post #10 of 14

Thank her, wish her well and be done. No love loss...you get to rest up! Turned out just the way it should!!

CakeWhizz Posted 6 Aug 2008 , 9:31pm
post #11 of 14
Quote:
Originally Posted by playingwithsugar

I've got to chime in here.

I have read, all too often, about decorators who send designs via e-mail, or have consultations where the potential client walks out with a design or two, without booking a cake.

You all are wasting valuable time giving your designs away like this.

I think it is time for all of you to start charging for your tastings and consultations, with all or a portion of the price rebated after delivery. I would go further to say that all designs are your property, and the sketch or design will be provided along with the rebate upon delivery.


JMHO -

Theresa icon_smile.gif




Hear, hear!

Trixyinaz Posted 6 Aug 2008 , 9:47pm
post #12 of 14

I agree with everyone who said to respond back noting that you got her email and wishing her well.

I recently had a lady contact me about cupcakes. She said my price wasn't in her budget. I responded back as she asked if a cake would be cheaper. I told her no, but then gave her some tips and a few referrals to some other decorators in the area (one of which I know is cheaper than me, not sure about the other two). She sent a note back saying how refreshing it was to find someone so helpful without wanting anything in return. She then went on to say that she would refer people to me when she knows of anyone needing a cake. How sweet is that icon_smile.gif ? Good luck and enjoy that extra time that weekend!

TC123 Posted 6 Aug 2008 , 10:04pm
post #13 of 14

I would just acknowledge her message and wish her well.

On a side note, I had someone contact me back in March regarding doing a wedding cake for July for 300 guests. A really sweet girl I know referred her to me because I do "custom" cakes. (No, they're not in my photos. Computer crash... Long story...) I explained to her while I was honored that she contacted me, I am not licensed and could not do her cake (as much as I badly wanted to ~ what exposure!!!!!). Anyway, based on what she told me, I had some ideas and I offered them to her. I even offered to write and draft them up for her. Her reply was "No. Let THEM do their homework." In other words, she was not going to take my ideas to another baker/decorator and let them pass it off as their own. icon_wink.gif

aligotmatt Posted 7 Aug 2008 , 2:00pm
post #14 of 14

Thanks for your responses, I just replied to her email and said "Best Wishes" and nothing else.

I live in kind of a destination wedding place, so she was an out of town bride who was getting married here and making all of her guests travel.

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