Rolling Pin Question

Decorating By allycook Updated 7 Aug 2008 , 10:28pm by allycook

allycook Posted 6 Aug 2008 , 3:44pm
post #1 of 12

Can someone tell me how to avoid getting a rolling pin intention when I roll up my fondant to place it over my cake? My fondant is too large to pick up. Help! icon_cry.gif Also, what type of knife is the best to use for cutting fondant?

11 replies
Lady_Phoenix Posted 6 Aug 2008 , 3:55pm
post #2 of 12

I don't fold my fondant. If its a large piece I loosely roll it around my pin. Then unroll over the cake, like you would a pie crust. I use a pizza cutter to cut it.

allycook Posted 6 Aug 2008 , 4:10pm
post #3 of 12

Clarifiacation, it isn't the rolling pin making the indention but the fondant edge that is rolled over the pin. Sorry, I didn't make that clear.

Cakepro Posted 7 Aug 2008 , 12:18am
post #4 of 12

Don't roll your fondant around your pin. Just roll one edge over and then pick up the rolling pin, continuing to roll the fondant over it but not rolled up around it.

Does that make sense?

Drape the fondant over the rolling pin. Like you would drape a towel over your arm.

LOL = can't explain well today. icon_biggrin.gif

Sherri

allycook Posted 7 Aug 2008 , 12:48am
post #5 of 12

Thanks cakepro, I will give it a try.

sandykay Posted 7 Aug 2008 , 3:11am
post #6 of 12

Are you rolling it on the counter or a mat? I use the Wilton roll and cut mat (the square one) it is much larger than the round ones, I just pick up the whole thing, drape it over my arm and flip it onto the cake. The nice part is there is a logo in the center so it helps in placement. Hope this helps. =)

allycook Posted 7 Aug 2008 , 12:44pm
post #7 of 12

Thanks, sandykay, for the help. I am always concerned with picking it up that it will stretch thin in some areas. This doesn't happen? Also, I will be rolling out fondant for an 18" cake. What do you think is the best way to get it onto the cake. I generally roll out on a sheet of vinyl . Maybe I should flip the whole thing for a layer that size. What do you think?

aswartzw Posted 7 Aug 2008 , 1:00pm
post #8 of 12
Quote:
Originally Posted by allycook

Thanks, sandykay, for the help. I am always concerned with picking it up that it will stretch thin in some areas. This doesn't happen? Also, I will be rolling out fondant for an 18" cake. What do you think is the best way to get it onto the cake. I generally roll out on a sheet of vinyl . Maybe I should flip the whole thing for a layer that size. What do you think?




Definitely! This is probably the best (ok, at least the easiest icon_lol.gif ) method for getting fondant onto any cake.

Cakepro Posted 7 Aug 2008 , 1:31pm
post #9 of 12

For any cakes that I roll the fondant out to 20" or less, I drape the fondant over the rolling pin (no, it doesn't stretch...but I use Satin Ice) because I do not like the surface that was on the mat to become the top surface of the cake. For anything larger (like the 18" you're covering, which will probably need to be rolled out to 26 -27 inches if your cake is 4" tall), I use the flip-the-vinyl-mat method. It's infinitely easier than handling a huge piece of fondant.

allycook Posted 7 Aug 2008 , 2:57pm
post #10 of 12

Thanks all of you for the help. I am nervous about the size of this one since it is a first larger than 12". Any other tips would be so appreciated. When you use the flip method do you use a thin film of shortening on the vinyl or cornstarch? The shortening leaves a film yet the cornstarch dries the fondant out a bit. Which is better?

Cakepro Posted 7 Aug 2008 , 7:20pm
post #11 of 12

I use Satin Ice, which doesn't require any non-stick agent to be applied to the vinyl. When I demonstrate covering cakes in fondant in class, however, I use Wilton fondant and have to use Crisco to make it not stick to the mat. What kind of fondant are you using? You also have to figure in your climate...if it's very dry where you are, cornstarch will reduce your working time with fondant and you could end up with elephant skin.

Since this is your first time covering a cake that large, I recommend you use shortening to give you a little bit more working time. The shortening absorbs into the fondant anyway.

allycook Posted 7 Aug 2008 , 10:28pm
post #12 of 12

Thanks. I make my own fondant. It's very humid here but I have run into the "elephant skin" once in a while so I think I shall take your advice and go with the Crisco. You have been so helpful.

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