International "translations" Of Common Used Terms

Decorating By PatrysV Updated 1 Aug 2008 , 4:20pm by PinkZiab

PatrysV Posted 1 Aug 2008 , 8:26am
post #1 of 39

We just had a discussion in a diffrent thread of what the "other" word is for certain items / terms which are used on CC. As we are all from diffirent countries and call the same thing diffirent names - it becomes quite confusion for those of us (like me ! icon_redface.gif ) that is not so knowledgeable on all this! icon_confused.gif

So here goes (the ones I figured out already icon_lol.gif )- please add as we go along:

Saran wrap: Cling wrap ; cling film
Parchment: Wax paper
Shortening: HOLSUM fat, crisco
Icing sugar: "something?" sugar (can't remember what you guys call it)
Baking Strips: Bake-even-strips
Fondant: Plastic Icing, Petti Nice

38 replies
mclaren Posted 1 Aug 2008 , 8:32am
post #2 of 39

icing sugar is also confectionery sugar or powdered sugar (PS).

CakeWhizz Posted 1 Aug 2008 , 8:49am
post #3 of 39

In the Uk, fondant is also called sugarpaste. Shortening is called white fat or vegetable fat and the common brands are Trex or White Flora.

PatrysV Posted 1 Aug 2008 , 8:49am
post #4 of 39

Thanks.

And could someone maybe clarify the following as well...

325 F = ??? Celsius?

mclaren Posted 1 Aug 2008 , 8:53am
post #5 of 39

Fahrenheit to Celsius Conversions

FAHRENHEIT CELSIUS
250° F 120° C
275° F 140° C
300° F 150° C
325° F 160° C
350° F 180° C
375° F 190° C
400° F 200° C
425° F 220° C
450° F 230° C

BakingGirl Posted 1 Aug 2008 , 8:53am
post #6 of 39

PatrysV,

I just wanted to point out that Parchment paper and Wax paper is not the same. Parchment paper can safely be used in the oven but Wax paper will burn. Out of the oven they have similar use though.

Relznik Posted 1 Aug 2008 , 8:55am
post #7 of 39

In the UK, if you refer to fondant, it's usually the stuff that you heat until it becomes a pouring fondant... you usually pour it onto things like cupcakes or things that you'd get in a high street bakery - like an iced finger (a bready type of long thing bun/cake with soft white icing on the top).

Suzanne x

marknelliesmum Posted 1 Aug 2008 , 9:03am
post #8 of 39

icon_redface.gif great minds think alike I started a similar thread before realising you had this - sorry icon_cry.gif

argray1 Posted 1 Aug 2008 , 9:07am
post #9 of 39

Could someone please post conversion table for American cup measurements to lbs or metric - kg/g. In the UK, we do not have cups and weigh all our cake ingredients on the scales. I have a few American cake books and they all have cup measurements. Or does anyone know where I can buy American cups in the UK. Thanks, Lily.

Relznik Posted 1 Aug 2008 , 9:29am
post #10 of 39
Quote:
Originally Posted by argray1

Could someone please post conversion table for American cup measurements to lbs or metric - kg/g. In the UK, we do not have cups and weigh all our cake ingredients on the scales. I have a few American cake books and they all have cup measurements. Or does anyone know where I can buy American cups in the UK. Thanks, Lily.




Hi Lily

You can cups to measure in loads of places now.

Lakeland Ltd - http://www.lakeland.co.uk/flipper-spoons-AND-cups/F/keyword/cup+measure/product/12114_12115

John Lewis - (these are ridiculously expensive... they do 'ordinary plastic ones, too, if you actually go into a store) http://www.johnlewis.com/Search/Search.aspx?SearchTerm=cup%20measure&Offset=1&refined=1&Navigator=trueproducttypenavigator&Modifier=Baking+Accessories


Found these on-line: http://thecookskitchen.com/browse_5740


Just do a Google search for Measuring Cups!

Hope this helps.

PatrysV Posted 1 Aug 2008 , 10:25am
post #11 of 39
Quote:
Originally Posted by marksmum

icon_redface.gif great minds think alike I started a similar thread before realising you had this - sorry icon_cry.gif




icon_redface.gif Sorry - you actually gave me the idea!!!...So this is now our thread together! thumbs_up.gif

Can someone also explain what is meant with "granulated" sugar? Is that "castor sugar" (a very fine, white sugar)?

Relznik Posted 1 Aug 2008 , 10:27am
post #12 of 39
Quote:
Originally Posted by PatrysV


Can someone also explain what is meant with "granulated" sugar? Is that "castor sugar" (a very fine, white sugar)?




In the UK, granulated sugar is a slightly larger crystal the castor sugar.

It's what we use for every day - on breakfast cereal, in tea and coffee, etc.

Just 'normal' sugar.

banba Posted 1 Aug 2008 , 10:44am
post #13 of 39

I would not try using conversion tables as a lot of sites give different values and cup measurements don't convert that accurately anyway.

Buy a set of cups and it will make it so much easier to use cup recipes. Also read up on how to use the cups as there's a knack to measuring certain ingredients.

Refer to your oven manual for temperature conversions and temperature suggestions as again these conversion values can differ from site to site.

I bake most cakes at 170 C in my fan oven and it works for me and that's what my oven manual states.

Cornstarch = Cornflour

All purpose flour = plain flour

Baking soda = bicarbonate of soda

cookies = biscuits

super fine sugar = caster sugar

jello = jelly

candied fruit = crystalized or glace fruit

Shredded coconut = dessicated coconut

Jelly roll pan = swiss roll tin

the list is endless!

indydebi Posted 1 Aug 2008 , 11:43am
post #14 of 39
Quote:
Originally Posted by argray1

Could someone please post conversion table for American cup measurements to lbs or metric - kg/g. In the UK, we do not have cups and weigh all our cake ingredients on the scales. I have a few American cake books and they all have cup measurements. Or does anyone know where I can buy American cups in the UK. Thanks, Lily.




I'm not sure that a simple conversion chart from volume to weight would be a good idea. You'd hav eto have a chart for every ingredient.

How much does a cup weigh? Are you talking about a cup of nails or a cup of feathers?

Relznik Posted 1 Aug 2008 , 11:47am
post #15 of 39

Oooh! I've got a question.

What's a stick of butter??? We don't have sticks of butter in the UK. We just have a 250g block of butter.

So what does a stick weigh, please?

Suzanne x

indydebi Posted 1 Aug 2008 , 12:05pm
post #16 of 39
Quote:
Originally Posted by Relznik

Oooh! I've got a question.

What's a stick of butter??? We don't have sticks of butter in the UK. We just have a 250g block of butter.

So what does a stick weigh, please?

Suzanne x




In American, our butter/margarine is sold in a one-pound box, cut into 4 sticks (4 quarters). So a stick of butter is 1/4 lb and it works out to be 1/2 cup. (Sorry I can't translate to g, but I can get you this close! icon_redface.gif )

sweetideas Posted 1 Aug 2008 , 12:06pm
post #17 of 39

This is a very interesting and helpful thread! Thanks for posting it!

Homemade-Goodies Posted 1 Aug 2008 , 12:06pm
post #18 of 39

I use the website www.convert-me.com for all cooking conversions between imperial sizes and metric. http://www.convert-me.com/en/convert/cooking

I use American recipes, and have all American measuring tools...but my purchases are in metric measures, so I need to make sure of amounts, etc. As well as be able to find out my root costs for CakeBoss.

One thing to note, dessicated coconut will not be the same as any American recipe calling for shredded coconut. US shredded coconut is moist, and covered in powdered sugar. I have tried to reconstitute the dessicated version for my own use, but it ended up being a gunky mess, unfortunately.

One stick of butter is a 1/4 of US pound = 4 ounces = 113.4g

Anything else, just give me a pm...I've pretty much got all the various conversions covered! icon_lol.gif

marknelliesmum Posted 1 Aug 2008 , 12:41pm
post #19 of 39

This puzzled me initially too - can't remember who told me but a stick is the equivalent to our 1/4 lb (give or take a few grams)

On another post over the past few weeks there was a link posted by someone( icon_redface.gif I wish I had JanH's memory icon_redface.gif ) which gave info on substitutes eg. making soured cream with lemon juice if you don't have an etc. If anyone has that link that would be a great help on here too - I'll trawl through and see if i can find it mean time!

PatrysV Posted 1 Aug 2008 , 12:47pm
post #20 of 39

icon_lol.gif O-o-o!! I like this discussions!!! I'm learning somusch and making sense out of many confusions - at last!!! thumbs_up.gif

What is the diffrence between "heavy cream" (in the cookie recipe)and normal cream?...Is it like sour cream?

Homemade-Goodies Posted 1 Aug 2008 , 12:49pm
post #21 of 39

I think that was a direction by bonjovibabe, for substituting for buttermilk in Phillipines. Don't know OP, but can maybe find it by search for buttermilk in forums.

**Edit: found it!!! http://forum.cakecentral.com/cake-decorating-ftopict-595152-buttermilk.html

Homemade-Goodies Posted 1 Aug 2008 , 12:57pm
post #22 of 39

Heavy cream is the same as whipping cream, or maybe 'slagroom' in S Africa.

banba Posted 1 Aug 2008 , 1:07pm
post #23 of 39

So a stick of butter is 4oz don't know the grams

marknelliesmum Posted 1 Aug 2008 , 1:09pm
post #24 of 39

heavy cream - i just assumed ( wrongly probably! icon_redface.gif ) that it was what we would call double cream. We have single, double, whipping (not whipped but for whipping icon_rolleyes.gif ) and sour cream in the UK.

APrettyCake Posted 1 Aug 2008 , 1:22pm
post #25 of 39

How about we have a CC acronym translation? I don't know what half of these things mean on this site icon_smile.gif

PatrysV Posted 1 Aug 2008 , 1:25pm
post #26 of 39

icon_surprised.gif Isn't it funny how even something like "cream" can be understood diffirently?! icon_confused.gif

It's like this "sleeved fillings" you guys refer to...... icon_confused.gif if we have something like that in SA, I don't know about it!!!? icon_redface.gif

PatrysV Posted 1 Aug 2008 , 1:29pm
post #27 of 39
Quote:
Originally Posted by APrettyCake

How about we have a CC acronym translation? I don't know what half of these things mean on this site icon_smile.gif




Yes Please!!! thumbs_up.gif

It took me very long to figure out what BC(buttercream) and DH (dearest Husband) stands for!!!!! icon_redface.gif
Now I know what RI (royal Icing) DD(Dearest Daughter) are as well!!! thumbs_up.gificon_lol.gif

Homemade-Goodies Posted 1 Aug 2008 , 1:30pm
post #28 of 39

There is a sticky note for the acronyms:
http://forum.cakecentral.com/cake-decorating-ftopict-2926.html

Leahs pointed out to me that 'sleeved fillings' were prepared fillings, they can be fruit or Bavarian cream, or the like. Each 'sleeve' usually has about 3 cups yield, from what I see online.
HTH

playingwithsugar Posted 1 Aug 2008 , 1:58pm
post #29 of 39

PatrysV -

Thank, you for posting this; I think it is a great idea. But can we take it one step further?

Allow me to explain -

Cake Central is based in the USA, but we have members from all over the world.

There was the question a few days ago about getting recipes which are written in Spanish translated to English. I am a second-generation American who can understand and speak her family's original language. I can remember the language barriers my grandmother had to deal with every day. I feel more sympathy for those who do not read or write in English, for they cannot read the millions of posts and thousands of recipes which are available in English only. It's a sword which cut both ways.

Then there is the problem of not knowing where everyone lives. Most people have their location added to their profile, but do we actually read a poster's location before replying? More often than not, we don't. Our hearts are in the right place, because we want to help that poster, but if they are not in the USA or Canada, they probably won't have a boxed mix readily available, nor Crisco.

It's impossible to make things work perfectly, but little things like your list, or adding your country to your profile, or actually reading someone's location before responding, adds to the ability to globally communicate better.

Thank you for your idea, and for reading this -

Theresa icon_smile.gif

isista Posted 1 Aug 2008 , 2:01pm
post #30 of 39

1 stick of butter = 1/4 pound
1 stick of butter = 1/2 cup
1 stick of butter = 8 tablespoons
1 stick of butter = 4 ounces
1 stick of butter = 113 grams
is the info that i received from www.onlineconversion.com

also while i was trying to make a red velvet cake this morning, i had to subsitute buttermilk since i don't have it here.. (1 tablespoon of white distilled vinegar, cider vinegar, or lemon juice to 1 cup (240 ml) of milk. Let this mixture stand 5 to 10 minutes before using.)this info is from www.joyofbaking.com
red velvet turned out greaticon_smile.gif

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