mock bettercreme & variations

Baking By micnmax2003 Updated 28 Jun 2012 , 7:47pm by ktbeths

micnmax2003 Posted 28 Aug 2008 , 3:06am
post #31 of 96

The recipe uses granulated white sugar not powdered/icing sugar.

micnmax2003 Posted 28 Aug 2008 , 4:32am
post #32 of 96

no, it's white granulated sugar

famousamous Posted 28 Aug 2008 , 6:23pm
post #33 of 96

Does the granulated sugar "melt", is the icing grainy? Sorry for all the questions, I realy want to try this one.

micnmax2003 Posted 28 Aug 2008 , 7:08pm
post #34 of 96

it dissolves and there is not gritty texture to the icing

Michelle104 Posted 28 Aug 2008 , 8:36pm
post #35 of 96

Marissa~When you did the choc version was the frosting a good brown? If not, could I add more choc syrup to get it there? Just thinkin for the baptism cuppies this weekend... icon_lol.gif

famousamous Posted 29 Aug 2008 , 2:50am
post #36 of 96
Quote:
Originally Posted by micnmax2003

it dissolves and there is not gritty texture to the icing




Awesome, thank you! icon_smile.gif

punkyf Posted 29 Aug 2008 , 7:46pm
post #37 of 96

I would like to try this icing but I want to add fondant stripes and things to accent the cake. Would the fondant sink into this type of frosting? I'm also going to put a gum paste shoe on top.

calicopurr Posted 2 Sep 2008 , 4:46am
post #38 of 96

Can someone PLEASE post the recipe to cake balls? I need these for a baby shower. Is there a binding ingredient and are what icing are they frosted in to harden and firm them up?

Michelle104 Posted 3 Sep 2008 , 3:29am
post #39 of 96

Hey calico! There are a lot of different variations. I've only made them twice! Both times I used frosting. The first time I used store bought cream cheese frosting and the second time I used some of my own BC. I baked a 9x13 and crumbled it and used about a cup of frosting to bind it. I used this one to make my icecream cone cakeballs in my pics. I think I had too much frosting the first time. It was really sticky. If you do a search for cake balls though, you should get all kinds of stuff. Hope this helps.... icon_biggrin.gif

AKA_cupcakeshoppe Posted 3 Sep 2008 , 3:51am
post #40 of 96
Quote:
Originally Posted by punkyf

I would like to try this icing but I want to add fondant stripes and things to accent the cake. Would the fondant sink into this type of frosting? I'm also going to put a gum paste shoe on top.




I am wondering about this too. hope someone can answer. TIA!

calicopurr Posted 3 Sep 2008 , 3:57am
post #41 of 96

I just commented on your ice cream cake balls cone.
They are sweet!
The cream cheese ones sound great...thx.
Calicopurr

Quote:
Originally Posted by Michelle104

Hey calico! There are a lot of different variations. I've only made them twice! Both times I used frosting. The first time I used store bought cream cheese frosting and the second time I used some of my own BC. I baked a 9x13 and crumbled it and used about a cup of frosting to bind it. I used this one to make my icecream cone cakeballs in my pics. I think I had too much frosting the first time. It was really sticky. If you do a search for cake balls though, you should get all kinds of stuff. Hope this helps.... icon_biggrin.gif


Michelle104 Posted 3 Sep 2008 , 4:49am
post #42 of 96

Thanks for the comment! Yes, just candy melts. The choc and white. Bakerella's blog has a tutorial for cupcake cake balls.

http://www.cakecentral.com/cake-photo_1258445.html

Check out these cake balls. They are so elegant and you could do this with any theme I think. So classy and pretty.

AKA_cupcakeshoppe Posted 3 Sep 2008 , 1:07pm
post #43 of 96

i made this today but didn't have granulated sugar so i used powdered sugar, turned out wonderful! really yummy icon_biggrin.gif

calicopurr Posted 1 Oct 2008 , 5:03am
post #44 of 96

I'm a bit icon_sad.gif with this recipe below. I'll tell you why, but I want to first say that
I did what another gal did.

There is another thread where another member is trying all the versions
and writing about it. I followed her idea of adding less milk so I could add the malted choc. syrup. I used 3/4 milk and used a strainer to get any lumps out.

In my opionion,
the recipe is a good base, but isn't tasty enough to serve without adding a
a flavor of choice....pudding, lemon, flavor oils, choc. sryups, jam, etc.
It pipes nicely, but must be immediately put in the fridge or it will separate(it did with my malted choc. sryup). If you don't keep these cold, the swirls you use to pipe the cuppies will disappear. I made red velvet cuppiecakes with the syrup and they need to kept COLD. They are delicious, but I'd rather have something more stable and safe left on the counter......plus, they are made with milk....so again, in the fridge they go.



.............................................................................................
Mock Whipped Cream Frosting with Variations

5 tbsp. flour
1 c. milk

Put above ingredients in a blender until completely mixed or mix with a whisk, but it must be completely blended. Put into a small pot and cook over low heat until the consistency of pudding. COVER AND COOL COMPLETELY. Set aside, then:

1/2 c. butter or margarine
1/2 c. Crisco shortening
1 c. granulated sugar
1 tsp. vanilla

Cream together 1/2 cup of shortening and 1/2 cup of butter or margarine until light and fluffy. To that add 1 cup granulated sugar a little at a time and beat until the sugar is dissolved. THIS MAY TAKE AS LONG AS TEN MINUTES - BE PATIENT. When dissolved or near to being dissolved, add the cooled flour mixture and beat until fluffy, then add vanilla.

NOTE: Other flavors may be substituted for the vanilla. Also, liquid chocolate or cocoa may be added. If you like color it takes food coloring beautifully.

dandelion56602 Posted 10 Nov 2008 , 7:07pm
post #45 of 96

So, has anyone else had problems w/ this "dissolving". And is there really a difference between the 1st Mock Buttercream & the 2nd Mock Buttercream in the 1st post. I want to try this, but don't want to if it's not going to hold up to room temp. Also, is the texture like a whip cream icing (sorry to compare, but like what Sam's or Walmart offers?)

hellie0h Posted 12 Nov 2008 , 4:19am
post #46 of 96

Here is a recipe from cc, it is called bakers butter cream. I have made this before and it is like a whipped cream texture and taste. I don't freeze it as it states in the recipe, I just frost the cake. I have also sub the sugar for splenda sugar for a diabetic frosting. Pulse regular sugar in food processor if you don't have superfine sugar.
http://www.cakecentral.com/cake_recipe-2114-18-Bakers-Butter-Cream.html

calicopurr Posted 12 Nov 2008 , 4:58am
post #47 of 96
Quote:
Originally Posted by hellie0h

Here is a recipe from cc, it is called bakers butter cream. I have made this before and it is like a whipped cream texture and taste. I don't freeze it as it states in the recipe, I just frost the cake. I have also sub the sugar for splenda sugar for a diabetic frosting. Pulse regular sugar in food processor if you don't have superfine sugar.
http://www.cakecentral.com/cake_recipe-2114-18-Bakers-Butter-Cream.html



Are you supposed to frost frozen cake layers? Thanks for sharing this recipe!

hellie0h Posted 12 Nov 2008 , 1:40pm
post #48 of 96
Quote:
Originally Posted by calicopurr

Quote:
Originally Posted by hellie0h

Here is a recipe from cc, it is called bakers butter cream. I have made this before and it is like a whipped cream texture and taste. I don't freeze it as it states in the recipe, I just frost the cake. I have also sub the sugar for splenda sugar for a diabetic frosting. Pulse regular sugar in food processor if you don't have superfine sugar.
http://www.cakecentral.com/cake_recipe-2114-18-Bakers-Butter-Cream.html


Are you supposed to frost frozen cake layers? Thanks for sharing this recipe!




I didn't frost a frozen cake, not sure why the poster of the recipe uses frozen frosting and frozen cake...maybe it is just the way that particular baker does cake.
No problems with using straight away.

rocketmom1985 Posted 12 Nov 2008 , 11:18pm
post #49 of 96

This is the same recipe as old fashioned icing my grandma made. She just called it cake icing. She only used butter in her recipes, don't think there was crisco back then, lol! I have made this also, and it really is creamy and delish. I think there a tons of other recipes out there with the idea of making a "roux" with the flour and milk, letting it cool then add it to whipped butter and regular sugar. The key to this icing is to beat it alot...until the graininess of the sugar disappears. Easy to do. I used this on one of my class cakes, my family refused to eat a cake entirely iced in Wilton class icing...I did the filling and base coat with granny's icing and then did reg class bc decor and flowers. It doesn't crust, but you can pipe on it and put premade bc flowers on it.
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cakedivamommy Posted 17 Nov 2008 , 1:07am
post #50 of 96

I have a question, if it has been answered I am sorry for the repeat. When making the base (milk and flour) I noticed in one other post that it is supposed to be put through a strainer. Does everyone do this and if you do not strain it to get the lumps out what will happen? Will they smooth out when beating? Thank you.

AKA_cupcakeshoppe Posted 24 Nov 2008 , 5:27pm
post #51 of 96

I don't know if this helps but when I make mine, I just whisk the flour and milk very well after cooking it, pour it into a container and cover with plastic then on to the fridge it goes. I have never had any lumps in it.

princessmargie Posted 3 Feb 2009 , 9:29pm
post #52 of 96

Hi Everyone!
So, I tired the first recipe (the mock bettercreme) and when I cooked the flour and milk, it went chunky. I cooked it on low heat. I proceeded to make the frosting thinking that maybe when I beat it in my mixer, the lumps would go away...didn't happen! I love the recipe and it tastes GREAT except for the flour chunks...LOL! Can someone please tell me what to do so this doesn't happen again and/or what I may be doing wrong? Thanks very much icon_smile.gif

princessmargie Posted 3 Feb 2009 , 9:30pm
post #53 of 96

Oops...I think this may have been answered already. Sorry for the duplicate question icon_razz.gif

MissCathcart Posted 14 Aug 2009 , 1:04am
post #54 of 96

I used the regular Kitchenaid paddle to make this recipe, but it took a very long time, even using superfine sugar. Then I tried the recipe after I purchased the BeaterBlade paddle. Wow, what a difference. Talk about fluffy, with no sugar grit. Now I use the BeaterBlade for all my cakes, and icings. Boy, do I reccommend that BeaterBlade. That was the best $25 I ever spent.

AKA_cupcakeshoppe Posted 15 Aug 2009 , 4:44am
post #55 of 96

I have made this lots of times and only have a hand mixer, still no lumps. it takes a long time though.

calicopurr Posted 17 Aug 2009 , 12:42am
post #56 of 96
Quote:
Originally Posted by hellie0h

Here is a recipe from cc, it is called bakers butter cream. I have made this before and it is like a whipped cream texture and taste. I don't freeze it as it states in the recipe, I just frost the cake. I have also sub the sugar for splenda sugar for a diabetic frosting. Pulse regular sugar in food processor if you don't have superfine sugar.
http://www.cakecentral.com/cake_recipe-2114-18-Bakers-Butter-Cream.html



The recipe above is much better than the mock whipped cream I made in a previous post on this thread. I even added choc. malt sryup. It's a soft icing. The texture is just like whipped cream, only there's no milk. The recipe above uses water. I used regular cane sugar. Just keep whipping it unti you don't feel grit between your fingers. Here are mine...delicious at room temp, but I'm sure they will be better in the fridge. That's where they are and I'll test another one when they are cold. Next time I make this, I am going to make it with 100% butter to see if I love it even more.
LL

jonahsmom Posted 13 Feb 2010 , 6:40pm
post #57 of 96

Does the first recipe need to be refrigerated?

mellee Posted 17 Feb 2010 , 11:14am
post #58 of 96

Hi. Just thought I'd throw my two cents in. I've made this recipe a zillion times. I always use a blender for the milk and flour--ALWAYS. I know it's an extra step, but it makes a HUGE difference. Once the milk and flour have cooked and start to thicken, poor the mixture into a bowl and put plastic wrap on right away, flattening the wrap all the way down to the surface of the mixture so no air gets at it. This way you'll have no "skin" to deal with when it cools.

I've experimented a lot and have decided that powdered sugar is the way to go. Otherwise you'll be beating the stuff for 15 minutes or longer! Also, when milk is cook, cooled, and combined in a recipe, the spoilage factor is not as dire because the liquid ratio has changed dramatically. I wouldn't leave this recipe (or any recipe) on the counter for months, but I have left this recipe on the counter for several days and it has been fine. This recipe doesn't crust, which is a bummer, but it's so nice and light and not too sweet. I love it!

Now I am off to check that recipe that hellieOh gave a link to! icon_smile.gif

Ronbob1984 Posted 17 Feb 2010 , 2:41pm
post #59 of 96

Can you sub corn starch for flour in this recipe. I would like to make it "Gluten Free".

2SchnauzerLady Posted 17 Feb 2010 , 3:05pm
post #60 of 96

I can get bettercreme, but I don't want the large quantity I would have to buy. These are perfect! Thanks so much!

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