Getting Rid Of The Center Hump

Decorating By ladyjaney Updated 31 Jul 2008 , 7:15pm by aswartzw

ladyjaney Posted 28 Jul 2008 , 11:03pm
post #1 of 31

Whenever I bake a cake (even when I use a flower nail or wrap the pan) and get a huge cracked hump in the middle and end of losing half the recipe in trimmings. My husband is happy about this, but I am not! Should I try baking at a lower temp for longer? Or a longer temp for shorter? or any other ideas?

30 replies
sari66 Posted 28 Jul 2008 , 11:12pm
post #2 of 31

Bake the cake longer at 325 use cake strips as well

kholton3 Posted 28 Jul 2008 , 11:24pm
post #3 of 31

Use well saturated bake even strips. It works wonders for me.

tracycakes Posted 29 Jul 2008 , 2:43am
post #4 of 31

Agreed. I even soak my bake even strips in ice water and bake at 325. Another tip is that when you first take your cake out of the oven, use a towel and press slightly in the center of the cake to eliminate any hump.

deliciously_decadent Posted 29 Jul 2008 , 7:17am
post #5 of 31

i slow bake at 150 degrees celsius (not sure of the conversion but have been told that it is lower than most people use so i am guessing 300? maybe 310?) andi only get a very small 'hump' that i trim using tghis method also means you do not need a flower nail inserted in the cake to bake

beachcakes Posted 29 Jul 2008 , 10:59am
post #6 of 31

It might be worth investing in an oven thermometer. Sounds like your oven is baking too hot. Try reducing your temp to 325.

aswartzw Posted 29 Jul 2008 , 1:42pm
post #7 of 31

1. I suggest an oven thermometer to verify what temp you're baking at.

2. Soak your cake strips for 30 minutes prior to use.

3. Bake for 20 minutes at 300 and then increase to 325 for the rest of the baking time.

4. Use homemade cake release: equal parts flour, veg. oil, shortening

I had the same issues and when I did this perfectly flat cakes!!! I even had one raise 1/2 inch above the pan without spilling over!!! I was shocked.

sandeeb Posted 29 Jul 2008 , 1:58pm
post #8 of 31

The advice you have been given sounds like it should work. I also wrap my pans and sometimes there's a little hump that I just press down with a cake circle.

The cake release I make is 2 parts shortening and 1 part flour. This mix works very well to. I usually make enough to fill a 3lb. shortening can.

poshcakedesigns Posted 29 Jul 2008 , 1:59pm
post #9 of 31
Quote:
Originally Posted by ladyjaney

Whenever I bake a cake (even when I use a flower nail or wrap the pan) and get a huge cracked hump in the middle and end of losing half the recipe in trimmings. My husband is happy about this, but I am not! Should I try baking at a lower temp for longer? Or a longer temp for shorter? or any other ideas?




Lower temp for a little longer. 325 is a good temp to use.

millermom Posted 29 Jul 2008 , 2:09pm
post #10 of 31

You can also use the flat side of a cookie sheet or other flat surface bigger than the cake. If you press it on as soon as you take the cake out of the oven, it won't stick to the cookie sheet.

ThreeDGirlie Posted 29 Jul 2008 , 2:13pm
post #11 of 31

Get an oven thermometer. I found that when I set my oven for 325, the temp in the center of the oven ranges from 365 down to 340 before it "kicks back on" to start heating more. So that's 15-40 degrees warmer that I want! The oven is at least 10 years old (we moved in the house 4 years ago, so I'm not sure the exact age), but it won't die on me so I cn justify a new one, LOL!

So using my thermometer, I have learned that I have to set the ovn in the 300-310 range, to end up with an ACTUAL temp of 325 that I want.

junny629 Posted 29 Jul 2008 , 2:20pm
post #12 of 31
Quote:
Originally Posted by aswartzw


4. Use homemade cake release: equal parts flour, veg. oil, shortening




aswartzw, so can I make a batch of this cake release and just use a bit each time I bake a cake? Just spread it all over the cake pan?

playingwithsugar Posted 29 Jul 2008 , 2:21pm
post #13 of 31

I agree with the others that your oven might be running too hot.

Spend a little money and get an oven thermometer at a reputable kitchen or home store. Make sure it can hang or stand in the oven. Place a cookie sheet in the oven, turn it on and to 350 degrees F. Allow it to heat for 20 minutes before standing the thermometer in the center of the cookie sheet. Turn the light on, and watch the thermometer through the window. Check it every 10 minutes for at least 30 minutes.

If you find that the oven is running hot, you can call a professional in to re-calibrate the thermostat and control knob.

Theresa icon_smile.gif

aswartzw Posted 29 Jul 2008 , 2:31pm
post #14 of 31
Quote:
Originally Posted by junny629

Quote:
Originally Posted by aswartzw


4. Use homemade cake release: equal parts flour, veg. oil, shortening




aswartzw, so can I make a batch of this cake release and just use a bit each time I bake a cake? Just spread it all over the cake pan?




Yep. I store mine in an empty Crisco can and when needed I use a silicone brush to spread it in the pan. It's super easy and I prefer this to my old method of greasing the pan and then coating with flour.

grammynan Posted 29 Jul 2008 , 2:39pm
post #15 of 31

Another tip from cake central:

Bake at 325 and DON'T grease the sides of the pans!
Works great every time!!

mjballinger Posted 29 Jul 2008 , 2:42pm
post #16 of 31

Are you tapping the pan on the counter to get the air bubbles out before you bake? This makes a big difference for me when I do cakes.

AKA_cupcakeshoppe Posted 29 Jul 2008 , 2:59pm
post #17 of 31
Quote:
Originally Posted by grammynan

Another tip from cake central:

Bake at 325 and DON'T grease the sides of the pans!
Works great every time!!



don't grease the sides? won't it stick?

i think my main problem is my oven temp, i think it's all over the place which is so frustrating because whenever i bake a cake the sides don't rise and i get a hump in the center too and then it cracks and it's just so frustrating and stressful.

aswartzw Posted 29 Jul 2008 , 3:02pm
post #18 of 31

I do the grease the sides and highly recommend it. Just use that release I gave you and you'll be fine. (My cakes baked to 2" perfectly!)

tracycakes Posted 29 Jul 2008 , 3:15pm
post #19 of 31

And check your oven temp. I was having all kinds of problems with foods not cooking, got an oven thermometer and discovered it was cooking 35 degrees too low! No wonder nothing was cooking in the time it was supposed to.

mcdonald Posted 29 Jul 2008 , 3:20pm
post #20 of 31

great tips on this thread... will have to print this one!!

cajundecoration Posted 29 Jul 2008 , 3:33pm
post #21 of 31

If you overbeat the batter, it will cause it to become too elasten. This can also cause huge hump tops on your cakes. I never beat until all lumps are gone. I beat until well incorporated. Don't worry, the lumps will bake out, and it also makes for a great, moist cake. Tapping the pans on the counter until bubbles disappear, and wrapping with bake strips make perfectly flat tops for me.

junny629 Posted 29 Jul 2008 , 4:59pm
post #22 of 31

Do you fill the pan 1/2 full or 2/3 full?

cajundecoration Posted 29 Jul 2008 , 5:35pm
post #23 of 31
Quote:
Originally Posted by junny629

Do you fill the pan 1/2 full or 2/3 full?




I measure exactly 3 cups of batter per pan. An average box of cake mix makes 6 cups of batter. For a 9 inch pan, I may make 2 boxes and fill with 4 cups.

aswartzw Posted 29 Jul 2008 , 7:25pm
post #24 of 31
Quote:
Originally Posted by junny629

Do you fill the pan 1/2 full or 2/3 full?




Here are recommended batter amounts per pan.

http://www.wilton.com/cake/cakeprep/baking/times/wedding_2inch.cfm

junny629 Posted 29 Jul 2008 , 7:58pm
post #25 of 31

Thanks for all the tips and info

grammynan Posted 29 Jul 2008 , 8:22pm
post #26 of 31

I learned from another thread about this that greasing the sides of the pan keeps the cake from rising up the sides because the grease makes the batter slip down. After it's baked, just run a knife around the side to release the cake. Since the bottom of the pan is greased, the cake comes right out.

Try it! And don't forget to bake it at 325 degrees and it will take a little longer.

kelsiedelizzle Posted 29 Jul 2008 , 8:25pm
post #27 of 31

I just found out that the Wilton 9" pans that we have at our house are 1.5" tall.

...

Is that a problem or am I freaking out over nothing?

sandeeb Posted 30 Jul 2008 , 9:17am
post #28 of 31

junny, yes you can you a little at a time, We use a brush to put it on with,about 2 inches wide. We keep it in the refrigerator when not in use. It comes to room temperature very quickly. It's wonderful and brushing it on saves so much mess.

sandeeb

aswartzw Posted 30 Jul 2008 , 3:20pm
post #29 of 31
Quote:
Originally Posted by caketeen09

I just found out that the Wilton 9" pans that we have at our house are 1.5" tall.

...

Is that a problem or am I freaking out over nothing?




I really don't like Wilton's 9" pans. They also have slanted sides preventing your cake from being nice and even when stacked unless you trim the sides. I recommend going out and buying another set of 9". Check for nice straight edges and decide if you want rounded or sharp edges.

kelsiedelizzle Posted 30 Jul 2008 , 5:44pm
post #30 of 31
Quote:
Originally Posted by aswartzw

Quote:
Originally Posted by caketeen09

I just found out that the Wilton 9" pans that we have at our house are 1.5" tall.

...

Is that a problem or am I freaking out over nothing?



I really don't like Wilton's 9" pans. They also have slanted sides preventing your cake from being nice and even when stacked unless you trim the sides. I recommend going out and buying another set of 9". Check for nice straight edges and decide if you want rounded or sharp edges.




I thought I was just OCD about that, but now I'm glad I'm not the only one! I'll start searching for some new pans. Which brand is your favorite?

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