What Steps Are Needed Before Covering A Cake With Fondant??

Decorating By serenelui Updated 28 Jul 2008 , 4:06pm by serenelui

serenelui Posted 27 Jul 2008 , 6:02pm
post #1 of 13

Hi all.. i'm a total noob at cake making and have never attended any cake making/ decorating courses but am hoping to try my hand at making a cake covered in fondant for a good friends daughter's birthday. However, i'm uncertain about what i need to do after i bake my cake. From what i've read, after baking and filling/ torting the cake, i will have to crumb coat the cake.

However, i have several questions for this.. firstly does the crumb coat need to be a crusting or non crusting buttercream recipe?

After crumb coating the cake, what is the next step? Some say the crumb coat needs to be set before laying on the fondant, others say the fondant should be laid onto the crumb coat directly while its still tacky and yet others say that an additional layer of buttercream frosting about 1/4" thick should be placed on the top of the cake before laying on the fondant? Which is right? I'm so confused!! icon_cry.gif

Could someone please advise me on what is the correct procedure?

I've also heard that for laying on fondant on cakes, the cakes only need a crumb coat as too thick a layer of frosting will cause bubbles/ sagging/ wrinkles to appear on the cake? Others say that an additional 1/4" of frosting should be added to the cake before the fondant is placed over the cake.. so which is right and easier for a newbie like me?

In addition, when crumb coating a cake.. does the cake need to sit on a cake board the exact size of the cake so that the cake can later be transferred to a nice clean cake board for presentation purposes?

Lastly if i am ambitious and want to try making a 2 layer stacked cake, e.g. a 9" and 6" cake, what is the process in doing this and does it need any dowel supports? I've read some of the articles about stacking cakes.. but to tell the truth.. i'm not really sure how it works.. can anyone help?

I'm sorry for asking all these dumb questions but i really need some help to clarify all the above questions i have icon_redface.gif

12 replies
sugarshack Posted 27 Jul 2008 , 7:10pm
post #2 of 13

hey there!

u can use a crusting or non crusting; both work.

some people use a crumb coat of BC, some use a full layer under the fondant. you have to find what works best for you.

I get the best results when:

1) i use a dense firm cake
2) very stiff dam for filling
3) let filled cakes settle
4) trim cake sides to make straight
5) crumbcoat
6) flash freeze for 6 minutes
7) cover with fondant a little under 1/4 inch thick


as far as stacking, yes the upper cake needs to be on a cake board, and you need to dowel under it . I use bubble tea straws for this as they are very sturdy and easy to cut. the dowels hold the weight of the above cake, not the lower cake itself.

i hope that helped a bit. you will more great advise here I am sure.

serenelui Posted 27 Jul 2008 , 7:20pm
post #3 of 13

Oh wow!! thanks so much sugarshack! That cleared up quite a number of my queries.. however.. i have one additional question... and that is after laying on the fondant on the cake do i need to place the cake back in the fridge?

I'm actually staying in a hot and humid country so i'm worried that if i flash freeze the cake after frosting with buttercream and before laying the fondant, the buttercream will actually soften and melt under the fondant... would this actually become a problem?

KoryAK Posted 27 Jul 2008 , 7:23pm
post #4 of 13

1) crust or non-crust doesn't matter. I do a full coating of non-crusting (SMBC) then chill thoroughly. This makes the butter hard and the cake easy to work with. If I am using a crusting, I would do the same thing. I have never spritzed my crusting with water to make it tacky again, but I guess you could if you were worried about it.

Yes, ice the cake on a same-size board then move to a larger decorative one when completely iced and fondanted.

For a tiered cake, each one goes on it own (same size) cardboard like if they were separate cakes. For me, I would place 5 drinking straws (all cut to the same height as each other, matching the tallest spot in the cake if its not perfectly level) in the bottom tier, blob or royal or buttercream, then the next cake. Some will hammer a center dowel (me: bamboo skewer) down the center once its together). Imagine doweling as if dowels and cardboards were all you could see, they would form a complete structure and would theoretically be able to stand on their own.

sugarshack Posted 27 Jul 2008 , 7:45pm
post #5 of 13
Quote:
Originally Posted by serenelui

Oh wow!! thanks so much sugarshack! That cleared up quite a number of my queries.. however.. i have one additional question... and that is after laying on the fondant on the cake do i need to place the cake back in the fridge?

i do not BUT if you use any perishable fillings, you will need to fridge. I use nothing perishable in my cakes.

I'm actually staying in a hot and humid country so i'm worried that if i flash freeze the cake after frosting with buttercream and before laying the fondant, the buttercream will actually soften and melt under the fondant... would this actually become a problem?




i do not have that problem but I work in a cool room, about 70 degrees. the cake and icing is not freezing in that 6 minutes. you are only flash freezing the icing enough to get it firm to stand up to the smoothing process. It will sweat just a little bit if you are in an a/c room; not enough to cause problems.

leahk Posted 27 Jul 2008 , 7:48pm
post #6 of 13

I don't hav eeasy access to cake boards- so here's my method for keeping the cake board clean:
I place the cake on the board and then work strips of baking paper underneaththe cake and on the board. I usually use about 5 around the cake. Then when I've finished icing I just carefully pull the strips from underneath- walla! clean board!

serenelui Posted 28 Jul 2008 , 3:42am
post #7 of 13

Thanks KoryAK, sugarshack and leahk for all the information.. icon_smile.gif that really helped a lot!

one last stupid question i have is flash freezing the cake for 6 minutes means placing it in the freezer not the fridge for 6 minutes right :p

serenelui Posted 28 Jul 2008 , 9:50am
post #8 of 13

*bump*

kimmypooh79 Posted 28 Jul 2008 , 10:16am
post #9 of 13

Right, you put the cake in the freezer for 6 minutes. I don't do mine that way. I just let mine sit for about 20 minutes on the table until the icing crusts.

serenelui Posted 28 Jul 2008 , 10:49am
post #10 of 13

Thanks kimmypooh79.. hmm.. think letting mine sit out on the table till it crusts probably won't work for me considering that the temperature where i am is nearly 34 degrees celcius and nearly 100% humidity all the time! haha...

peg91170 Posted 28 Jul 2008 , 12:02pm
post #11 of 13

I just put mine back into the fridge for a short time and haven't had any problems. I never put any of my cakes in the freezer. Basically because I don't have the room.

sugarshack Posted 28 Jul 2008 , 4:00pm
post #12 of 13

right, I do freezer for 6 minutes. firms it up fast and seems to sweat less ( for me) than using the fridge and faster.

evryyone finds the way that works for them, so you have to experiment!

serenelui Posted 28 Jul 2008 , 4:06pm
post #13 of 13

thanks all... will experiment and see which works best for my climate and country. Thanks so much everyone for your great advice and input.. really learned a lot from everything that you guys have said icon_smile.gif

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