Regarding Copyrights, Recipes And Student Handouts...

Business By 4Gifts4Lisa Updated 28 Jul 2008 , 10:21pm by 4Gifts4Lisa

4Gifts4Lisa Posted 27 Jul 2008 , 4:29pm
post #1 of 11

I am planning to start teaching on my own...as in, not through Wilton (I am a WMI, currently teaching at Michaels). I would like to make up my own handouts and structure my course offerings a little differently. My plan is to give handouts corresponding to different techniques, and maybe put recipes in as well...general recipes.

I am terrified of violating any copyrights. I use NFSC regularly...this recipe is very similar to one I have always used, with the exception of extra vanilla. This recipe is also very similar to Wilton's. Is such a widespread recipe copyrighted? If I hand it out, do I have to attribute it to anyone? If I change the amount of vanilla, is it then not copyrighted? B/c chances are the recipe is out there in every variation.

Also, if I make up my handouts, say with diagrams or whatever, am I voilating any copyrights when I discuss how to make each flower/border/etc? Because again, the techniques are all the same! I am not talking about copying Wilton or another book word for word, but I don't know how to go about this. Even if I say, "taken from such and such a book", I would need to get permission?

Thank you in advance for any help!

10 replies
Tashablueyes Posted 27 Jul 2008 , 4:39pm
post #2 of 11

I would say that on recipes you could list almond extract as an ingredient and then below give them the option of leaving it out, then you are changing the recipe, but not enough to compromise the quality of the recipe. Half the time I add almond extract anyway. And you could use your own wording here and there. Recipes and techniques are incredibly similar, and generally with copyrights there's nothing they can do if something is different enough from the original.

BakingJeannie Posted 27 Jul 2008 , 5:30pm
post #3 of 11

I can't remember in which publication I read about copyrights of recipes, but what I gathered is, the difference has to be in how the method for preparing the recipe is written.

I will look in some of the books I have to see if I could find it.

loriemoms Posted 27 Jul 2008 , 5:46pm
post #4 of 11

I dont know if this will help, but I took a cake decorating course at a community college a few years back. The teacher also taught at Michaels. The class had all the same handouts (without Wilton's name on it) and we used a lot of Wilton products (mainly because they were readily available) I wasn't even aware we were doing a "wilton course" till I saw some photos on here of those two tiered wedding cakes with the roses and the basket weave...and they were from a Wilton Course. (she went a little more details then you do at Michaels because it was a 6 week course, 4 hour classes) so who knows!! What did Wilton tell you when they gave you the materials?

4Gifts4Lisa Posted 28 Jul 2008 , 3:34pm
post #5 of 11

Thanks, everyone!

Wilton didn't tell me anything, but I am pretty sure you cannot copy their stuff, remove their logo and use it...yikes!!!

snarkybaker Posted 28 Jul 2008 , 4:18pm
post #6 of 11

You cannot copyright a list of ingredients, even in specific amounts. That is how Martha Stewart got away with hijacking Julia Child's recipes for all those years. You can copyright the description of the MOP ( method of production).

By changing the description of how to make the item, you make the recipe your own.

I won't comment on using wilton's handouts, because I never studied the " wilton method" since I don't really relate to their non-food sensibilities.

ccr03 Posted 28 Jul 2008 , 4:33pm
post #7 of 11

Not sure how this comes into play in your situation, but under the FOIA (Freedom of Information Act) up to five copies can be made of a copyrighted material for educational distribution. For example, as the instructor, you can make up to five copies of a recipe found in a Wilton cookbook, but after those five are distrbuted you can no longer make any copies to be dstributed.

For your situation, look further into the guidelines with FOIA. The FOIA has special provisions for material used for educational purposes - you should need to figure those out.

HTH

4Gifts4Lisa Posted 28 Jul 2008 , 4:35pm
post #8 of 11
Quote:
Originally Posted by txkat


I won't comment on using wilton's handouts, because I never studied the " wilton method" since I don't really relate to their non-food sensibilities.




Huh? Share the dirt icon_biggrin.gif

ccr03...thanks for the info!!!

loriemoms Posted 28 Jul 2008 , 7:02pm
post #9 of 11

You know, you could just direct all your students to Wiltons web site and have them print out the recipes. Or have them all buy a thing of mer. Powder. All their recipes are in that little handout in the cap!!

Carolynlovescake Posted 28 Jul 2008 , 8:54pm
post #10 of 11

Howdy Lisa!

Thanks again for driving me to AIM.

90% of my class hand outs I've made up on my own. LOL

If you want them let me know and I'll get them to you some how.

4Gifts4Lisa Posted 28 Jul 2008 , 10:21pm
post #11 of 11
Quote:
Originally Posted by CarolynGwen

Howdy Lisa!

Thanks again for driving me to AIM.

90% of my class hand outs I've made up on my own. LOL

If you want them let me know and I'll get them to you some how.




carolyn, I want them!

On a side note, I got my business license and tax ID number today...I can run a teaching business and sell cake kits!!! I am so excited!!!

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