Can You Dry Buttercream For Decorations??

Decorating By Miksadie Updated 24 Jul 2008 , 3:43am by indydebi

Miksadie Posted 23 Jul 2008 , 3:42pm
post #1 of 10

I am so, so new!!! I was wanting to know if you can dry buttercream for decorations. For example, pipe out a bike decoration on wax paper and then put it on top of a cupcake for example. Or do initials and then place them on a cake or cupcake.

I so appreciate this website and everyone's wisdom. This site has gotten me to look forward to and enjoy baking and decorating!!

Mikki

9 replies
snowshoe1 Posted 23 Jul 2008 , 4:30pm
post #2 of 10

Sounds like what you want to do is a frozen buttercream transfer. Here is a tutorial:

http://www.cakecentral.com/article12-How-To-Create-a-Frozen-Buttercream-Transfer.html

HTH

Lady_Phoenix Posted 23 Jul 2008 , 4:32pm
post #3 of 10

Most dried decorations like that are made from royal icing. I don't think buttercream would hold up well.

taxnerd Posted 23 Jul 2008 , 10:45pm
post #4 of 10

I have made flowers, mostly roses & rose buds, from stiff buttercream and then frozen them so that I can transfer them to the cake. By the time the buttercream thaws & softens, the flowers are already on your cake. It probably wouldn't work with outline type items like initials or design outlines.

lillicakes Posted 23 Jul 2008 , 10:54pm
post #5 of 10

I have dried buttercream roses and other flowers (in flower formers, or just flat on waxed paper squares), but don't think it would work for an outline figure--they don't get QUITE that hard or durable.

tracycakes Posted 24 Jul 2008 , 12:33am
post #6 of 10

I've made roses ahead and let them dry but most flowers I've made ahead or either royal icing or more recently, gumpaste.

indydebi Posted 24 Jul 2008 , 12:47am
post #7 of 10

I air-dry my BC flowers all the time. To me, it's the only way. Air-drying removes all the moisture, making the flower light weight so it stays on the cake better (like on the side). Anything frozen will melt when removed from the freezer. I have thrown some roses in the freezer when I had to make a couple of extra last minute and bluntly, it's a mess getting it to the cake. They start to melt IMMEDIATELY (just like a FBCT will). I'm only able to take out one at a time and then I'm almost running from freezer to cake to get it there .... and it still melts too much. (Did a small anniversary cake a few weeks ago and didn't make the roses ahead of time. Put them in the freezer ..... I will NEVER do that again! What a disaster!)

Air dry. Only.

Miksadie Posted 24 Jul 2008 , 1:56am
post #8 of 10

Thanks everyone. I have never worked with royal icing. But I guess there is never a better time to try and teach myself. icon_cool.gif

mclaren Posted 24 Jul 2008 , 3:26am
post #9 of 10
Quote:
Originally Posted by indydebi

I air-dry my BC flowers all the time. To me, it's the only way. Air-drying removes all the moisture, making the flower light weight so it stays on the cake better (like on the side). Anything frozen will melt when removed from the freezer. I have thrown some roses in the freezer when I had to make a couple of extra last minute and bluntly, it's a mess getting it to the cake. They start to melt IMMEDIATELY (just like a FBCT will). I'm only able to take out one at a time and then I'm almost running from freezer to cake to get it there .... and it still melts too much. (Did a small anniversary cake a few weeks ago and didn't make the roses ahead of time. Put them in the freezer ..... I will NEVER do that again! What a disaster!)

Air dry. Only.




debi,

how do you air dry your BC? can it be done if the BC is made from all butter or SMBC / IMBC types of BC?

TIA.

indydebi Posted 24 Jul 2008 , 3:43am
post #10 of 10

I only use one kind of icing .... http://forum.cakecentral.com/cake_recipe-6992-Indydebis-Crisco-Based-Buttercream-Icing.html

It's the only one I've ever used for 25 years. It ain't broke so I'm not fixin' it! thumbs_up.gif

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